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Full text of "Annual reports"

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TOWN OF MEDFIELD 



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ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

OF THE 

TOWN OFFICES 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 3 1 , 2002 



HARDING STREET POST OFICE 

In the late 1800s the Town of Medfield was served by two post offices. The original post 
office pictured on the cover is located on Harding Street, and is presently a private 
residence. It served the Medfield State Hospital and residents in the northern end of town 
numbering approximately 1,000 patrons. It remained in service until about 1912 when a 
new post office was built on an adjacent piece of property. The new building was in 
operation for sixty years before closing in 1972 and remains on Harding Street today. 
When zip codes were enacted in 1963 the Harding Street Post Office was assigned 
02042. 



st Office on file with the Medfield Historical Society 




352 nd Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports2002medf 



DEDICATION 




Robert E. Naughton 

He was a quiet man, with a twinkle in his eye and a friendly word for all. He 
carried the burdens of many in his heart, but respected confidences and 
encouraged the troubled to look on the bright side, the disheartened to try again, 
and the lonely to share his friendship. Bob was a paradigm for young police 
officers, a confidant to his colleagues in the department and a breath of fresh air to 
the judges, court personnel and legal community at the Norfolk County 
courthouses. 

But Bob Naughton was more than a police officer; he was first and foremost a 
good man. He worked hard and played hard. Whether it was hauling wood for the 
lumberjack show he organized as part of Medfield's 325 th Anniversary 
Celebration, excavating a well at the Dwight Derby House, or camping in the 
woods of Northern Canada, Bob was never afraid to work up a good sweat or 
pitch in and do what needed to be done. When the Home Committee needed a 
hand, Bob was there; when the Historical Commission had an archaeological dig 
he was there shovel in hand. No one was unimportant to him; nothing was too 
small to merit his attention. He was not easily impressed and yet he would give 
undivided attention when the circumstances required. 



Together with his wife Karen and his son Todd they personified what a family 
should be about; unique in their closeness and yet always open to others. And so 
it was with shock to everyone when Bob Naughton was taken from us, too soon 
and too suddenly. We miss you Bob. 



IN MEMORIAM 



Fred W. Clarridge, Jr. 

Town Common and Parking Area Committee 1965-1 966 

Warrant Committee 1 969- 1 97 1 

Committee to Study Medfield Traffic 1 995- 1 996 

Board of Health Associate 2000-2001 

Robert E. Naughton 

Constables and Keepers of the Lockup 1 970-2002 

Special Police Officer 1 970- 1 972 

Temporary Intermittent 1970-1972 

Police Officer 1975-2002 

Historical Commission 1996-2001 

Mary E. Rogers 

Medfield Housing Authority 1 994-2002 

Frederick C. Conley 

Town' s First Executive Secretary 1 970- 1 974 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 
FORMEDFIELD 



STATE 




Senator in General Court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth District 

Jo Ann Sprague 

State House Room 3 1 3B 

Boston, MA 02 133 

(617)722-1222 

j spragiie@senate .state.ma. us 

Representative m General Court 

IT Norfolk District, Precinct 1 Sl 2 

Lkla Harkins 

State Mouse Room 235 

Boston, MA 021 33 

(617) 722-2883 

RepXidaHarkins@hou.state.ma.us 

Representative in Genera! Court 

9th Norfolk District. Precinct 3 & 4 

Scott P. Brown 

State House Room 443 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2460 

Rq>,ScoitBorwn@hou.state.ma.us 



Governor's Councillor 
2 ad District 
Kelly A. Timilty 
State Mouse Room 1 81 
Boston, MA 02133 
(617) 727-2795 



FEDERAL 





U.S. Representative to Congress, 9 th District 

Stephen F. Lynch 

John J. Moakley Federal Courthouse 

Suite 3 1 1 

Boston, MA 02210 

(617)428-2000 

steph.en.lynch@maiLhouse.gov 

Vnmd States Senator 

Edward M. Kennedy 

2400 J.F.K. Federal' Building 

Boston. MA 02203 

{617)565-3170 

senator@kennedy.senate.gov 

United States Senator 

John F. Kerry 

1 Bowdoin Square, W' ".Floor 

Boston, MA 02 114 

(617)565-8519 

johnJkeny@kerry.senate.gov 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Incorporated 


1651 


Population 


12,832 as of December 31, 2002 


County 


Norfolk 


Size 


14.43 square miles 


Miles of Highway 


74.72 


Elevation 


180 feet above sea level at the Town House 


Registered Voters 


7,828 as of December 31, 2002 




Democrats 1,503 




Republicans 1,562 




No Party or Designation 4,728 




Other 35 



Government 



Official Notices 



Board of Selectmen 

Annual Town Election is the last Monday in March 

Open Town Meeting is the last Monday in April 

All Town Board and Commission meetings are posted on 
the Town House bulletin board 



Tax Rate 

Taxes Due 

Town House Hours 

Library Hours 



Transfer Station 
Hours 



14.91 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/01-6/30/02) 
15.96 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/02-6/30/03) 

August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st , and May 1 st 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Thursday, 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM 
Friday, 8:30 AM to 1:00 PM 

Monday-Thursday, 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM 
Friday, Saturday, 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM 
Sunday, 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM (October-March) 





Wed 


Fri 


Sat 


Sun i 


April 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


___ 


9 to 4 1 


July 


9 to 7 


9t0 4 


9 to 4 




| August 


9 to 7 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 




| November 


9to4 


9 to 4 


9to4 " 


9 to 4 j 


All other months 


9to4 


9 to 4 


VtoAT 





ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 

2002-2003 



Elected Officials 

Moderator 

George P. Niles, Jr. 

Town Clerk 

Carol A. Mayer 

Board of Selectmen 

Osier L. Peterson 
Ann B. Thompson 
Paul B. Rhuda 

Board of Assessors 

Bruce J. Beardsley 
Clara E. Doub 
Francis W. Perry 

School Committee 

William A. Tosches 
Steven E. Kramer 
Carolyn P. Casey 
Susan C. Cotter 
Debra Noschese 

Trustees of the Public Library 

Maura Y. McNicholas 
Jo- Anne L. Hooper 
James J. Whalen 
Robert Luttman 
Geoffrey C. Tritsch 
Patricia S. Fitzgerald 

Planning Board 

Wright C. Dickinson 
Elissa G. Franco 
George N. Lester 
Stephen J. Browne 
Timothy P. Sullivan 

Park and Recreation Commissioners 

James C. Landry 
Scott F. McDermott 
Thomas A. Caragliano 
Lisa Louttit 
Stephen Farrar 





Housing Authority 




2003 


James T. Regan 


2003 




Richard D. Jordan 


2004 




Paul Galante 


2005 


2003 


Valerie A. Mariani, state appointment 


2006 




Lisa Donovan 


2007 


2003 


Trust Fund Commissioners 




2004 


Georgia Colivas 


2003 


2005 


Stephen T. Pelosi 


2004 




Evan S. Weisenfeld 


2005 


2003 
2004 


Appointed bv the Board of Selectmen 






2005 


Fire Chief 






William A. Kingsbury 


2004 


2003 


Chief of Police 




2004 


Richard D. Hurley 


2004 


2004 






2005 


Sergeants 




2005 


Ronald E. Ken- 


2003 




Raymond J. Wheeler 


2003 




John L. Mayer 


2003 


2003 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2003 


2003 


Raymond M. Burton 


2003 


2004 






2004 


Police Officers 




2005 


Richard D. Bishop 


2003 


2005 


Daniel J. Burgess 


2003 




Patrick J. Caulfield 


2003 




Lorna C. Fabbo 


2003 


2003 


Robert G. Flaherty 


2003 


2004 


Dana P. Friend 


2003 


2005 


Shawn P. Garvey 


2003 


2006 


John D. Geary 


2003 


2007 


Stephen H. Grover 


2003 




Thomas M. LaPlante 


2003 




Kevin W. Robinson 


2003 


2004 






2004 


Town Administrator 




2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2004 


2005 






2005 


Treasurer/Collector 






Georgia K. Colivas 


2003 







Christopher Cronin, Asst Bidg inspector 


2003 


Superintendent of Public Works 




William Krawec, Asst Bidg Inspector 


2003 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2004 


Peter Navis, Gas, Asst. Plumbing 


2003 






John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing, Asst. Gas 


2003 


Town Accountant 




John F. Fratolillo, Asst. Plumb., Asst. Gas 


2003 


Joy Riccuito 


2003 


James J. Leonard, wiring inspector 


2003 






Joseph Wallace, Asst. Wiring 


2003 


Town Counsel 




Joseph F. Erskine, Asst. Wiring 


2003 


Mark G. Cerel 


2004 


Official Greeter of the Town of 




Board of Health 




Medfield 




Lucy Schlesinger 


2003 


Joseph E. Ryan 


2003 


Vincent Lavallee 


2003 






Marcia Aigler 


2004 


Official Historian of the Town of 




Kathleen Schapira 


2004 


Medfield 




Frances Sullivan 


2004 


Richard P. DeSorgher 


2003 


Elizabeth Dorisqa, Associate 


2003 






Keith Diggans, Associate 


2003 


Official Keepers of the Town 
Clock 




Cemetery Commissioners (3 years) 




Marc R. Tishler 


2003 


Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 


2003 


David P. Maxson 


2003 


David F. McCue 


2004 






Eric W. O'Brien 


2004 


Board of Registrars 








Roberta A. Kolsti 


2003 


Water and Sewer Commissioners 




William H. Dunlea, Jr. 


2004 


Neil D. Mackenzie 


2003 


Anna M. Murphy 


2005 


Gary A. Lehmann 


2004 






Mark R. Tishler 


2005 


Veterans' Service Officer 




Edmund L. Kelley, Associate 


2003 


G. Marshall Chick 


2003 



Superintendent of Insect Pest Control 

Edward M. Hinkley 2003 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Michael J. Clancy 



2003 



Tree Warden 

Edward M. Hinkley 



2003 



Measurer of Wood and Bark 

Michael J. Clancy 



2003 



Field Driver and Fence Viewer 




Public Weigher 




John P. O'Toole 


2003 


Michael J. Clancy 


2003 


Animal Control Officer 




Constables and Keepers of the 




Jennifer A. Shaw 


2003 


Lockup 








Richard D. Bishop 


2003 


Inspector of Animals 




Daniel J. Burgess 


2003 


Jennifer A. Shaw 


2003 


Ray M. Burton, Jr. 


2003 






Robert W. Brady 


2003 


Pound Keeper 




Patrick J. Caulfield 


2003 


Jennifer A. Shaw 


2003 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2003 






Robert B. Flaherty 


2003 


Inspection Department 




Dana P. Friend 


2003 


John P. O'Toole, Building Inspector 


2003 


Shawn P. Garvey 


2003 


Anthony Calo, Asst. Building Insp., resigned 


2002 


John T. Garvey 


2003 



John D. Geary 


2003 


Dana Kozak (Millis) 


2003 


John F. Gerlach 


2003 


William LeBlanc (Millis) 


2003 


Stephen H. Grover 


2003 


Albert Leverone (Norfolk) 


2003 


Richard D. Hurley 


2003 


Donna McGowan (Norfolk) 


2003 


Ronald E. Ken- 


2003 


Albert Manganello 


2003 


George W. Kingsbury 


2003 


John Maloney (Millis) 


2003 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2003 


Nicholas Meleskis 


2003 


William H. Mann 


2003 


Charles Moneales 


2003 


John L. Mayer 


2003 


R. Patrick Murphy (Dover) 


2003 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2003 


John Nash 


2003 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2003 


Lori Niles 


2003 


Kevin W. Robinson 


2003 


Frederick Paulette 


2003 


Thomas A. Tabarani 


2003 


Andrea Pierce-Leary 


2003 


Raymond J. Wheeler 


2003 


Donald Reed 


2003 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2003 


Patricia Rioux 


2003 






Wayne Sallale 


2003 


Police Matrons 




Carl Sheridan 


2003 


Jessie A. Erskine 


2003 


Christopher Sousa (Millis) 


2003 


Mary V. Gillis 


2003 


Richard Strauss 


2003 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2003 


Thomas Tabarani 


2003 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2003 


Sally Wood 


2003 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2003 






Louise Papadoyiannis 


2003 


Emergency Management Agency 




Patricia A. Rioux 


2003 


Richard Hurley, Director 


2003 


Jennifer A. Shaw 


2003 


Arline F. Berry 


2003 


Mary L. Solari 


2003 


Scott Brooks 


2003 


Sally Wood 


2003 


Ray M. Burton 


2003 






Jon R. Cave 


2003 


Special Police Officers 




John L. Evers 


2003 


Herbert Bun- 


2003 


Barry Glassman 


2003 


Jon Cave 


2003 


Neil I. Grossman 


2003 


Douglas Common (Dover) 


2003 


Thomas S. Hamano 


2003 


William J. Davis (Norfolk) 


2003 


William Johnson 


2003 


Joseph Deptula (Norfolk) 


2003 


Paul Kearns 


2003 


Jeffrey Drees (Dover) 


2003 


Steven Krichdorfer 


2003 


Louis Droste (Norfolk) 


2003 


Charles A. Moneale 


2003 


John Evers 


2003 


Donald W. Reed 


2003 


William Fitzpatrick 


2003 


Wayne A. Sallale 


2003 


Russell Flannery (Millis) 


2003 


Armando R. Vieira 


2003 


Robert Forsythe (Norfolk) 


2003 


Sally Wood 


2003 


Jennifer Gates 


2003 






John Gerlach 


2003 


Traffic Supervisors 




Barry Glassman 


2003 


Robert W. Brady 


2003 


Thomas Hamano 


2003 


Joseph Carvalho 


2003 


Jeffrey Hill (Millis) 


2003 


John T. Garvey 


2003 


Paul Hogan 


2003 


Mary Gillis 


2003 


John Holmes (Norfolk) 


2003 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2003 


Robert Hoist (Norfolk) 


2003 


George W. Kingsbury 


2003 


Paul Kearns 


2003 


Priscilla Mahoney 


2003 


Michael Kiessling 


2003 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2003 


Stephen Kirchdorfer 


2003 


William H. Mann 


2003 



10 



Armando B. Palmieri 


2003 


Cemetery Agent 




Louise Papadoyiannis 


2003 


Lawrence G. Whitestone 


2003 


Mary Solari 


2003 






Renata Walter 


2003 


Charles River Natural Storage Area 
Designees 




Affordable Housing Committee 




Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Charles H. Peck 


2003 






Diane L. Maxson 


2003 


Collective Bargaining Team 




Stephen M. Nolan 


2003 


Ann B. Thompson 


2003 


Joseph Zegarelli 


2003 


Richard D. Hurley 


2003 


John W. McGeorge 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Dorothy J. Steeves 


2003 


Daniel Nye 


2003 


Jeff Hanson 


2003 


Paul Williamson 


2003 


Kristine Trierweiler, Ex Officio 


2003 






Ann B. Thompson, Ex Officio 


2003 


Community Gardens Committee 








Leonard C. Haigh 


2003 


Council on Aging 




David J. Noonan 


2003 


Margaret T. Jenkins 


2003 






Olaf R.Ness 


2003 


Conservation Commission 




Ruth Nadler 


2004 


Robert Kennedy, Jr. 


2003 


Louis Fellini 


2004 


Bruce Redfield 


2004 


Eileen Sullivan, resigned 


2004 


Deborah Bero 


2006 






Michael Perloff 


2006 


Americans with Disabilities Compliance 


Philip J. Burr 


2006 


Review Committee 




I. Lorah Igo 


2004 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


Ralph Parmigiane 


2004 


Richard D. Hurley 


2003 


Theresa A. Cos, Associate 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate 


2003 






Caroline Standley, Associate 


2003 


Board of Appeals on Zoning (3 year 


appt.) 






Stephen P. Nolan 


2003 


Constables for Election 




Robert F. Sylvia 


2004 


Carol A. Mayer 


2003 


Russell J. Hallisey 


2005 






Charles H. Peck, Associate 


2003 


Contract Compliance Officer 




Burgess P. Standley, Associate 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Thomas M. Reis, Associate 


2003 










Economic Development Commission 


(3yr) 


Medfield Cultural Council (3 year appt) 


John T. Harney 


2003 


Lucinda Davis 


2003 


Eric O'Brien 


2003 


Isabella Wood 


2003 


Charles Peck 


2003 


Lee Knowles Howell 


2003 


Ann B. Thompson 


2004 


Francis A. Iafolla 


2003 


Paul E. Hinkley 


2004 


William F. Pope 


2004 


Patrick Casey 


2005 


Martha M. Moon 


2004 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2005 


Karen Delio 


2005 






Tobey Reed 


2005 


Representative to Regional Hazardous 


Ron Gustavson 


2005 


Waste Committee 




Ann Marie Sweeney 


2005 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


Michael Sweeney 


2005 







11 



Capital Budget Committee 

Daniel Nye 
Joseph Cucinotta 
Donald H. Harding 
Osier L. Peterson 
Kristine Trierweiler 
Timothy P. Sullivan 

Emergency Medical Services Response 
Committee 

David Binder, M.D. 
William A. Kingsbury 
Joan M. Kiessling 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
James D. Sullivan, M.D. 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 

Emergency Planning Commission 

Kenneth P. Feeney 
Edward M. Hinkley 
Richard D. Hurley 
William A. Kingsbury 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 

Enforcing Officer for Zoning 

John P. O'Toole 

Anthony Calo, Assistant, resigned 

Enterprise Fund Committee 

Georgia K. Colivas 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Mark R. Tishler 

Fair Housing Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Geographical Information System 

Judith A. Cahill, resigned 

Sandra H. Frigon 
Gary A. Lehmann 
Raymond P. Moore 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Michael Perloff 
Sheryl D. Sacchetine, resigned 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Kristine M. Trierweiler 
Carol Mayer 



2003 


Historical Commission (3 year appt.) 




2003 


Daniel Bible 


2003 


2003 


Jonathan Gray 


2003 


2003 


Monica Bushnell 


2004 


2003 


Ancelin Wolfe 


2004 


2003 


Mary Preikszas 


2004 




Burgess P. Standley 


2005 


e 


David F. Temple 


2005 




Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate 


2003 


2003 


Deborah Gaines, Associate 


2003 


2003 


David R. Sharff, Associate 


2003 


2003 


Michael R. Taylor, Associate 


2003 


2003 


John A. Thompson, Associate 


2003 


2003 


Electa Kane Tritsch, Associate 


2003 


2003 


Jacqueline Wile, Associate 


2003 


2003 


Clara B. Doub, Associate 
Historic District Commission 


2003 


2003 


Burgess P. Standley 


2003 


2003 


Michael Taylor 


2004 


2003 


Barbara Jacobs 


2004 


2003 


Connie Sweeney 


2005 


2003 


David R. Sharff 


2005 


2003 


Insurance Advisory Committee 






W. Grant Chambers 


2003 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


2003 


Joseph B. Mc Williams 
Kingsbury Pond Committee 


2003 


2003 


Michael Cronin 


2003 


2003 


Armand Janjigian 


2003 


2003 


Paul Simpson 


2003 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 




John Pratt 


2003 




James Shannon 


2003 


2003 


Sheila Joyce 


2003 




Weston Kolsti 


2003 


2003 


Local Auction Permit Agent 




2003 


Evelyn Clarke 


2003 


2003 






2003 


Local Water Resource Management 




2003 


Official 




2003 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


2003 






2003 


Medfield MBTA Advisory Board 




2003 


Designee 




2003 


Michael J.Sullivan 


2003 



12 



Medfield State Hospital Community 
Advisory Board 

John T. Harney 2003 

Richard D. Hurley 2003 

William A. Kingsbury 2003 

Paul B. Rhuda 2003 

Leo J. Surette 2003 

Ann B. Thompson 2003 



Drew C. Adams 2003 

Representatives to Neponset 
Watershed Initiative Committee 

Michael J. Sullivan 2003 

Open Space Planning Committee 

Jonathan Bennett 2003 

Christine M. Hajjar 2003 



Medfield State Hospital Reuse 




Eric W. O'Brien 


2003 


Committee 




Martha L. Smick 


2003 


Frank L. Garrison 


2003 


Caroline D. Standley 


2003 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2003 


I. Lorah Igo 


2003 


Burgess P. Standley 


2003 


Marie Zack Nolan 


2003 


Martha L. Smick 


2003 






Leo J. Surette 


2003 


Parking Clerk and Hearing Officer 




Ann B. Thompson 


2003 


Carol A. Mayer 


2003 


John T. Harney 


2003 






Philip J. Bun- 


2003 


Right-To-Know Coordinator 




Thomas Sweeney 


2003 


William A. Kingsbury 


2003 


Metropolitan Area Planning Counci 


I 


Radio Tower Study Committee 




Kristine Trierweiler 


2003 


David P. Maxson 


2003 






Willis H. Peligian 


2003 


Memorial Day Committee 




Paul B. Rhuda 


2003 


June M. Doucette, resigned 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Patricia Hoyt, resigned 


2003 






Richard D. Hurley 


2003 


Safety Committee 




William A. Kingsbury 


2003 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


Jane M. Lomax 


2003 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Albert J. Manganello 


2003 






William H. Mann 


2003 


Solid Waste Study Committee 




Frederick Miller, Jr. 


2003 


LeBaron C. Colt, Jr. 


2003 


Ann B. Thompson 


2003 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


Michelle Doucette 


2003 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2003 






Ann B. Thompson 


2003 


Committee to Study Memorials 




Cynthia Greene 


2003 


Richard P. DeSorgher 


2003 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2003 


G. Marshall Chick 


2003 


Sandra Frigon 


2003 


Robert A. Kinsman 


2003 


Karen Shapiro 


2003 


Jane M. Lomax 


2003 






David F. Temple 


2003 


Technology Study Committee 




Francis Iafolla 


2003 


Richard Boucher 


2003 






Alan Joffe 


2003 


Municipal Census Supervisor 




Gary Lehmann 


2003 


Carol A. Mayer 


2003 


Raymond Moore 


2003 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2003 


Municipal Planning and Building 




Kristine Trierweiler 


2003 


Committee 




Geoffrey Tritsch 


2003 


LeBaron C. Colt, Jr. 


2003 






Bruce O. Tobiasson 


2003 







13 



Three Rivers Interlocal Council 




Appointed bv the Chairman of the 




Kristine Trierweiler 


2003 


Selectmen, Chairman of the School 








Committee and the Town Moderator 


Adult Community Center Study 








Committee 




Vocational School Committee 




Louis Fellini 


2003 


Representative 




Robert Luttman 


2003 


Karl D. Lord June 30, 2004 


Vincent Lavallee 


2003 






Lisa Thompson, resigned 


2003 


Appointed bv the Fire Chief 




Elizabeth Don sea 


2003 


Charles G. Seavey, Deputy 


2003 


Carl Mellea 


2003 


Thomas Seeley, Captain 


2003 






Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lt 


2003 


Finance Study Committee 




Richard M. Rogers, Lt 


2003 


Charles Kenny 


2003 


David C. O'Toole, Lt 


2003 


Michael Cronin 


2003 






Robert S. Donald 


2003 


Appointed bv the Board of Health 




H. Porter Terry 


2003 


William R. Domey, P.E. 


2003 


Thomas J. Weyl 


2003 


Sheryl Sacchetine, resigned 


2002 






Janet Lelienthal, resigned 


2002 


Elderly Taxation Aid Committee 




Mark Oram 


2003 


Georgia Colivas 


2003 


Nancy Bennotti 


2003 


Clara Doub 


2003 






Nan Rogers 


2003 


Appointed bv the Moderator 




Michael Sullivan 


2003 


Deputy Moderator 




Downtown Study Committee 




Thomas Sweeney 


2003 


Robert Dugan 


2003 






Judith Calaguire 


2003 


Warrant Committee 




Lisa Falcone 


2003 


Victoria Schepps 


2003 


Craig Neubecker 


2003 


Joseph R. Parker 


2003 


Brandi Erb 


2003 


Daniel W. Nye 


2003 


Millie Downing, Alternate 


2003 


Anne M.Curtin 


2004 


Matthew Flotta, Alternate 


2003 


Marie Zack Nolan 


2004 


David Stephenson, Alternate 


2003 


Richard E. Gordet 


2004 


Frank Perry, Alternate 


2003 


Connie Jones 


2005 


Trish Gedarovich, Alternate 


2003 


John C. Moon 


2005 


Nancy Kelly-Lavin, Alternate 


2003 


Stephen S. Curran 


2005 


Appointed bv the Board of Assessors 




Permanent School Building and 




Stanley E. Bergeron 


2003 


Planning Committee 








David Binder 


2003 


Appointed bv the Town Accountant 




C. Richard McCullough 


2004 


Denise Mason 


2003 


Keith Mozer 


2004 






Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2004 


Appointed bv the Town Clerk 




Susan C. Cotter 


2005 


Patricia Iafolla Walsh, resigned 


2003 






Appointed bv the Treasurer/Collector 







Clara DeVasto 2003 

Meline Karapetian 2003 

Diane Adair 2003 



14 



Appointed by the Town Moderator, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and 
Chairman of the Warrant Committee 

Personnel Board 

Susan Richards 2003 

Keith R. Wasley 2005 

Debbie Shuman, Associate 2003 

Rev. Robert Wood, Associate 2003 

Appointed by the Planning Board 

Long Range Planning Committee 



Robert F. Tormey, Jr. 


2003 


Peter J. Fellman 


2003 


Margaret H. Gryska 


2003 


Burgess P. Standley 


2003 


Keith R. Diggans 


2003 


Sign Advisory Board 




Millie A. Downing, resigned 


2002 


J. Matthew McCormick 


2002 


Alfred J. Bonoldi 


2003 


Jeffrey Hyman 


2003 


Thomas D. Erb 


2005 


Thomas J. Roycroft 


2005 



15 



MEETING SCHEDULE 



Name 


Day 

Last Monday in March 


Time 

6:00 AM to 8:00 PM 


Location 


Annual Town Election 


Memorial School 


Annual Town Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Appeals Board 


Wednesday as needed 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Board of Assessors 


1 st Thursday 


6:00 PM 


Town House 


Board of Health 


1 st and 3 rd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Town House 


Cultural Council 


Biannually 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Conservation 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Historical Commission 


3 rd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Housing Authority 


2 nd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Tilden Village 


Library Trustees 


2 nd Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Library 


MEMA 


1 st Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


East Bldg, MSH 


Park and Recreation 


2 nd and 4 th Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Pfaff Center 


Planning Board 


Mondays 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


School Committee 


1 st and 3 rd Mon 


7:30 PM 


High School 




Monthly (July- August) 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Selectmen 


Tuesdays 


7:00 PM 


Town House 


Warrant Committee 


Tuesdays (Nov. -May) 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Water and Sewer 


1 st and 3 rd Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Town House 



16 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2002 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March. Mr. Osier L. Peterson was 
elected Chairman and Ms. Ann B. Thompson was elected Clerk. Mr. Paul B. Rhuda 
who was elected by the Townspeople, was the third member of the Board. 

Police Department 

It is again with much sadness that the Board of Selectmen reports the loss of a 
Medfield Police Officer. Police Detective Robert Naughton was killed in a boating 
accident in Maine in June of this year. Detective Naughton, husband and father of one, 
served the Town of Medfield for twenty seven years. He will be greatly missed by his 
colleagues and the residents of Medfield. 

Personnel Developments 

June Doucette retired from the Accounting Department after twenty years of service to 
the Town of Medfield. Ms. Doucette started her career at the Town Hall in the Public 
Works Department before moving to the Accounting Department. 

The Board of Selectmen celebrated with Joseph Erskine on the accomplishment of 
fifty years of service to the Town as Wiring Inspector. 

The Board of Selectmen were sad to learn the death of Frederick C. Conley who 
served as the Town's first Executive Secretary from 1970 to 1974. 

Medfield State Hospital 

After many years of speculation and rumor the town received notice in May of this 
year that the Medfield State Hospital would be closing in June of 2003 and would be 
declared surplus land by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Medfield State 
Hospital, located in both Medfield and Dover, has been in operation since 1896. There 
are approximately 225 acres of land located in Medfield. Upon receiving this news 
the Medfield State Hospital Committee immediately began to investigate the role of 
the town in surplus land disposition process. The Committee obtained a grant working 
in conjunction with the Towns of Dover and Sherborn from the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council under Executive Order 418 which allowed the town to a hire a 
professional planning firm and begin the planning process which will culminate in a 
re-use plan for the state. The Committee held its first public workshop in November at 
the State Hospital and informed the residents of Medfield, Dover, and Sherborn of the 
time line for closure, disposition and to solicit ideas for re-use of the site. The 



18 



Committee will continue to work with all the parties involved to produce a closure and 
re-use plan that will be beneficial to all town residents while honoring the memory of 
the state hospital. 

Capital Projects 

A Special Town Meeting was held in February at which the Permanent School 
Planning and Building Committee requested an additional six million dollars for the 
school building construction project that was approved at the 2001 Annual Town 
Meeting. The voters approved the additional six million dollars request for the on 
going project at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School, the Thomas Blake Middle 
School and the Memorial School. 

The Department of Public Works has begun the South Street Sidewalk Reconstruction 
Project which runs from Main Street to Route 27. The section of the project from 
Curve to Elm Street is approximately 50% complete and should be finished in 2003. 

The Department of Public Works and the Board of Assessors continues to work with 
the new Geographic Information System that is currently 90% completed. This project 
will assist the town in compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's 
Stormwater Phase II Regulations and allow the town the ability to update and produce 
Assessor's Maps in-house. 

The sewer installation and extension program for the Town is in its final phases. Phase 
IB has been completed and is ready for residents to connect, Phase IC is 90% 
complete for residents to connect and Phase ID is 75% complete. Services will be 
available in Phase ID once the pump stations are completed and on-line. 

Other Developments 

The Board of Selectmen would like to congratulate Senator Joanne Sprague on her 
reelection to the state legislature. The Board of Selectmen would also like to welcome 
Representative Scott Brown who represents Precinct 2 and Precinct 3 in Medfield. 
Representative Brown replaces Representative John Rogers due to statewide 
redisricting. Representative Lida Harkins continues to represent Precinct 1 and 
Precinct 2. 

Once again the Board of Selectmen is pleased to announce that the Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test scores were released placing 
Medfield students near the top in overall statewide rankings. 

As the Town and the Commonwealth continue to struggle with the ongoing fiscal 
crisis the Board of Selectmen feel it is more important than ever for all departments to 
work together as a team to address the budgetary shortfalls. The Board of Selectmen 
would like to thank the department heads and their staff, elected and appointed 



19 



officials and volunteers for their tireless efforts in the ongoing pursuit of a balanced 
budget. Without these efforts the Board would not be able to continue to strive for the 
goal of improving the quality of life for all residents while preserving and sustaining 
the small town character of Medfield. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Osier L. Peterson, Chairman 
Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 
Paul B. Rhuda 



20 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 21 st Annual Report for the Public Works Department, 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

The South Street Sidewalk Reconstruction Project from Main Street to Route 27 is 
still ongoing. The section from Curve Street to Elm Street is 50% complete and will be 
completed in 2003. The Highway Department installed 951 feet of drainage and 20 
catch basins/manholes in this area. Three stormwater rechargeable systems were 
integrated into the drainage system bringing this section into compliance with EPA 
Stormwater Phase II Regulations. We are currently working with NSTAR to relocate 
the utility poles along this project. 

The following roads were resurfaced with a stone seal: Grove Street, Bishop Road, 
Copperwood Road, Clayton Street, Kamark Road, Country Way, Gun Hill Road and 
South Street (Rt. 27 to RR). The following roads were treated with Crack Fill: Gun 
Hill Road, Country Way, Summer Street, Wood End Lane and Rt. 27 (to Sherbom 
line). 

Under the Phase IB Sewer Project the following streets and sidewalks were 
reconstructed and resurfaced: Harding Street, Hilltop Circle, Westview Road, Cedar 
Lane, Hospital Road, Lakewood Drive, Lakewood Terrace, Maplewood Road, Nauset 
Street, Pilgrim Lane, Scott Road, Spruce Way, Cross Street, Granite Street, Rocky 
Lane and Winter Street. 

Under the Phase 1C Sewer Project the following streets and sidewalks were 
reconstructed and resurfaced: Mohawk Street, Penobscot Street, Indian Hill (to 
Mohave Road), Grace Drive, Steven Lane and Carmen Circle. 

Snow : Total snowfall for the year was 44 inches. Approximately $22,000 from the 
Snow Budget was turned back to the General Fund. 

Transfer Station: The Medfield Highway Department trucked 3,518.11 tons of 
rubbish to the Millbury incinerator. 

The Town collected $4,684.00 in revenue from local businesses for non-recyclable 
trash taken to the Transfer Station. 

The Public Works Department applied for and received $4,350.41 from the Municipal 
Recycling Incentive Program. 

An approximate total of forty thousand pounds of CRTs were collected at the Special 
Collection Days that were held in April and September. 



21 



104.56 


tons 


6.00 


Tons 


17.50 


tons 


185.58 


tons 


799.45 


tons 


1,200.00 


tons 


$ 2,358.00 



The Household Hazardous Waste Day held in May of this year cost approximately 
$8,000 for the removal of hazardous materials. 

The mercury collection program is ongoing at the Public Works Department at Town 
Hall. Residents are encouraged to drop off items containing mercury e.g. 
thermometers, thermostats and florescent bulbs. 

Recycling: 

Glass 

Cans 

Plastic 

Light Metals 

Newsprint/Cardboard 

Grass/Leaves/Brush 

Revenue received from deposit cans and bottles: 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

A new water line on Causeway Street was installed in two phases. In the first phase, 
2,080' of twelve inch ductile iron pipe was installed with four hydrants added to the 
line. In the second phase, the water line was continued for a distance of 6440' of 
twelve inch ductile iron pipe and an additional four hydrants were installed. On 
Orchard Street, a Medfield-Norfolk water connection was laid for a distance of 1 160' 
of eight inch ductile iron pipe and one hydrant installed. On Allen Lane, a water line 
of 1060' of 8" ductile iron pipe and one hydrant was added at the home owners 
expense. On Liberty Road, 528' of eight inch ductile iron pipe was added for fire 
protection at Granite Street to the Walpole line. 

On Forest Street, 2112' of eight inch ductile iron pipe and four new hydrants were 
installed. 

The Medfield Water Department installed twenty three new services and replaced five 
hydrants. 

Flushing Program : The Water Department continues to flush the water system twice a 
year in an effort to ensure quality water. 

The Water Department was awarded second place for excellence in communication 
under the Safe Drinking Water Act Consumer Confidence Report by the New England 
Water Works Association. 

A total of 521,182,146 gallons of water was pumped in 2002. 



22 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 2002 the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant treated 334,028,707 gallons of 
sewerage from homes and various businesses in town. The State Hospital discharged 
32,336,350 gallons of sewerage and 448,900 gallons of septic from private systems 
was treated. The combined effluent was discharged to the Charles River with a better 
than 98% removal of impurities. One million four hundred ninety two thousand five 
hundred gallons of sludge was shipped to Woonsocket, Rhode Island for incineration. 

Phase IB Sewer Project: all pipes and services are installed and ready for homeowners 

to connect. 

Phase 1C Sewer Project: 90% complete - completed area is ready for homeowners to 

connect. 

Phase ID Sewer Project: 75% complete - service will be available when pump 

station and connecting lines are complete. 

The following pumping stations went on line: 
Lakewood Drive April, 2002 

Foundry Street May, 2002 

Orchard Street August, 2002 

Beginning in March 2002, Camp, Dresser & McKee and SEA started a total up-grade 
of the Medfield Waste Water Treatment Plant. As of December 31, 2002, 80% of the 
up-grade has been completed. 

The Wastewater Treatment Plant was inspected in July by EPA and DEP and found to 
be in compliance with all regulations. 

There were one hundred thirty new sewer hook-ups in 2002. 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation to Administrative Secretaries Edie 
Femald of the Highway Department and Mary Luciano of the Water and Sewer 
Department. Appreciation is also given to Robert Kennedy, Street Department 
Foreman, Edward Hinkley, Water & Sewer Foreman and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator 
of the Wastewater Treatment Plant as well as all the men of the various departments 
who are to be commended for their continuous conscientious public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney 
Superintendent of Public Works 



23 



BOARD OF WATER AND SEWERAGE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Town responded to the mandatory water conservation invoked due to last summer's 
severe draught. Water consumption was kept within the goals of the program. 

Transfer of the hospital wellfield and adjacent parcels of land now state property to the 
Town of Medfield is under review again due to pending closure of the State Hospital. 
An independent assessor has been selected to determine the basic value of the well field. 
Cost of restoring the wells by the town will be taken into consideration to determine the 
final price. The well field will provide ample water of excellent quality to the residents 
of Medfield for the foreseeable future. The associated 40 acres will be an asset to our 
open space program. 

The hospital now pays to the Water & Sewerage Enterprise Fund for processing of their 
sewerage and provision of water. With the pending closure of the hospital, Medfield will 
forego approximately $137,000 of sewer fees per year. The loss of revenues to the 
Enterprise Fund will have to be made up by an increase of sewer fees to the residents of 
Medfield. A public hearing will be scheduled to address the issues. 

The Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade that was mandated by the State has been 80% 
completed. Renovation and upgrade is being paid by the Enterprise Fund and should be 
finished by September 2003. 

Repair of the older sewer lines is continuing on a yearly basis to further reduce the 
inflow/infiltration of stormwater into the sewer system. This is reducing the load for our 
plant and prevents stormwater to flow into the Charles River through our plant. 

The EPA, State DEP and the Neponset and Charles River Watershed Associations are 
concerned that sewer extensions might deplete the aquifers. To minimize this potential 
impact, they promote better stormwater management by the towns adjacent to these river 
basins. In keeping with this, the EPA had issued Phase II of Stormwater Management 
Policies requiring communities and individual homeowners to promote recharging of 
aquifers while protecting wetlands and well fields. 

The Public Works Department has taken over responsibility for implementing Phase II. 
The town has completed an over-flight photo mapping of the town to document the 
outfall pipes of our stormwater disposal system. The first milestone in this EPA- 
mandated plan is March 10, 2003. The document is in review and will be delivered on 
time. 



24 



The Water & Sewerage Board has essentially completed the sewer extension program for 
the Town. The balance of the contracted work will be complete this year after the shut 
down for the winter season. The final repaying operations will be completed next year 
after the winter freeze and thaw cycle. There is additional capacity at the sewer plant, 
however, we expect only minor adjustments will be necessary in the future. 

With the completion of previous sewer extension projects, abutters may connect to the 
new lines as needed. While mandatory connection is not required, the Town is issuing 
betterments to those properties that abut the newly completed sewer lines. A listing of 
the completed sewer lines is provided by an appendix to this report and also available at 
the Office of Water & Sewerage, Town House and on the Medfield Web Site. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neil D. MacKenzie, Chairman 

Gary A. Lehmann 

Marc Tishler 

Edmund L. Kelley, Associate Member 



25 



Street Name 


Sewer 
Completion Date 


Final Paving 
Completion Date 


Alder Road 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Camelot Lane 


Summer, 2003 


Summer, 2004 


Carmen Circle 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Causeway Street (#2 - #6) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Causeway Street (#57 to #28) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Cedar Lane 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Clark Road 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Crest Circle 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Cross Street 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Eastmount Road 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Fairview Road 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Fieldstone Drive 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Forest Street (Water & Drainage Complete) 


Summer, 2003 


Base Paving Completed. 
Final Paving 2003. 


Foundry Street (Beween Philip & Nebo Streets) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Grace Drive 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Granite Street (#97 -#173) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Granite Street (#1 - #96) 


Summer, 2003 


Summer, 2004 


Harding Street (#1 1 9 - #1 42; #1 54 -#171) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Hearthstone Drive 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Henderson Way 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


High Street (#4 -#14) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


High Street (#15 -#25) 


Summer, 2003 


Summer, 2004 


Hillcrest Road 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Hilltop Circle 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Hopi Avenue 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Hospital Road (#1 1 - #29) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Indian Hill Road (#1 - Hopi Avenue) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Indian Hill Road (Hopi Avenue - #80) 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Lakewood Drive 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Lakewood Terrace 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Ledgetree Road 


Sewer Completed 


2003 



26 



Street Name 


Sewer 
Completion Date 


Final Paving 
Completion Date 


Main Street (#355 - #367) 


Sewer Completed 


N/A 


Main Street (#574 - #609) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Maplewood Road (#1 - #20) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Mohave Road 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Mohawk Street 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Nauset Street 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Nebo Street 


Sewer Completed 


Base Paving Completed. 
Final Paving 2003. 


Niantic Street 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Noon Hill Road (#3 -#10) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


North Street (#198 - #206; #61 - #70) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Onondaga Lane 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Orchard Street 


Sewer Completed 


Base Paving Completed. 
Final Paving 2003. 


Penobscot Street 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Philip Street (Between Cross & Foundry Streets) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Pilgrim Lane 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Rocky Lane (#5 - #53) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Rustic Lane 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


Scott Road 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Seneca Street 


Sewer Completed 


2003 


South Street (#265 - #354) 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Spruce Way 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Stevens Lane 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Westview Road 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 


Winter Street 


Sewer Completed 


Paving Completed 



Final street restoration is done after a minimum of one winter weather settling period has passed. If final paving 
is done before the street has time to settle, the new pavement could deteriorate and form areas of depression. 

A more detailed schedule is available for review at the Medfield Town House, 459 Main Street. If you have any 
questions regarding the sewer connection process, please contact the Water and Sewer Department at (508) 
359-8505, extension 601 . 



27 



PLANNING BOARD 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2002 the Planning Board did not approve any new definitive subdivision 
plans. 

A total of three lots were released for building from one previously approved 
subdivision: Bunker Estates at Southern Acres. 

The Board endorsed three "approval-not-required" plans, creating two new buildable 
lots and one non-buildable lot along an existing street. 

The Board also approved one Site Plan for improvements at Shaw's. 



TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Planning Board placed one article on the Warrant for 2002 which was approved 
and will allow an accessory structure that would not exceed 15 feet by 10 feet, and 
not exceed 12 feet in height, to be located in the rear yard with a setback to the rear 
lot line of no less than 20 feet and side lot line of no less than 12 feet. 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

During 2002 the Sign Advisory Board continued to review applications for sign 
permits and to advise and assist sign applicants. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

The Planning Board continued to work with the LRPC toward the improvement of 
managed growth within the Town, in part, through reviewing the Zoning By-Law. 
The Board is grateful for the LRPC's diligent research and efforts in these matters. 

OTHER BUSINESS 

Board members served on the Trails Study Committee and Capital Budget 
Committee. 

The Board continued to use the engineering services of Earth Tech, Inc. for 
subdivision review and street construction inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of the 
Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to Town Counsel Mark G. Cerel; 
Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth P. Feeney; and Tree Warden Edward 
Hinkley. 



28 



Planning Board meetings are generally held on Monday evenings at 8:00 P.M. at the 
Town House. These meetings are open to the public. Appointments with the Board 
must be made by the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Request for information or 
appointments should be directed to the Planning Board Administrator, Norma Cronin, 
at the Town House, 508-359-8505, ext. 645. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wright C. Dickinson, Chairman 
Elissa G. Franco, Vice-Chairman 
George N. Lester, Secretary 
Timothy P. Sullivan, Member 
Stephen J. Browne, Member 



29 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2002 the Board of Appeals acted on fifty-seven applications as follows: 

GRANTED: Two Special Permits for Recreational Structures i.e. swimming 

pools 
Two Special Permits for a restaurant and parking 
Two Special Permits for food establishments and parking 
One Special Permit for a home occupation 
One Special Permit for a fitness center 
Thirty-five findings that proposed additions will not intensify the 

existing nonconformity 
One Special Permit for parking regulations 
One Special Permit and Variance for a veterinary hospital 
One extension for a previously granted permit 
One amendment to a Comprehensive Permit 
One Variance from front setback requirement 
One amendment to an Open Space Development Permit 

DENIED: One Variance from Maximum Lot Coverage 
One Dunkin Donuts Restaurant 

One finding on nonconformity because the applicants failed to 
present their case 

Five applications were withdrawn without prejudice. 

The Board of Appeals would like to express its sincere thanks for all the support 
and consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards and the 
residents of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Russell J. Hallisey, Member 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Thomas M. Reis, Associate 
Burgess P. Standley, Clerk 



30 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Fiscal Year 2002 tax bills were mailed timely in December of 2001 with a rate of 
$14.91/$ 1,000. Very few abatement applications were received challenging the 
valuations. Each abatement application received was reviewed by the Town 
Appraiser, Stan Bergeron, and acted upon by the Board during the first half of 2002. 

Much of the Board's efforts in 2002 were spent on department staffing requirements. 
In January of 2002, the Board welcomed Donna M. O'Neill as our new Administrative 
Assistant. Donna is a long time Medfield resident and previously worked with the 
Medfield Parks and Recreation Department. Donna has completed several assessing 
and GIS courses recently and has made a significant contribution to our office during 
her short tenure. During November, Kathy Berteletti joined the department to assist 
with processing excise tax bills and deeds. Kathy resides in Canton and was formerly 
employed by the Town of Sharon. 

The Assessing Department continues to benefit from the work of several residents 
involved in the senior work off program. These residents have assisted the department 
scanning property cards and measuring and listing properties as part of the 
department's cyclical property review process. 

In April of 2002, Francis J. Perry III was elected to his first three year term on the 
Board of Assessors. Mr. Perry was appointed to the Board in 2000 to serve the 
remainder of Carol Rossi's term. 

During the second half of 2002, the department began preparing for our triennial 
revaluation for Fiscal Year 2004. The revaluation is an update of all assessments in 
the community as of January 1, 2003. Our last triennial revaluation was undertaken 
for Fiscal Year 2001 with values as of January 1, 2000. 

In December of 2002 proposed values for Fiscal Year 2003 were certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue and the Fiscal 2003 tax rate was approved at 
$15. 96/$ 1,000, a 7.04% increase from the Fiscal 2002 rate. 

A Fiscal Year 2004 budget for the Assessing Department was submitted in December 
to the Board of Selectmen and Warrant Committee for their review. The budget 
request is slightly below that requested for Fiscal Year 2003 even in light of the 
Board's ever increasing duties. 



31 



The Board of Assessors would like to acknowledge the retirement of Irene Hartling in 
December. For over a decade Irene was a fixture in the Assessor's Office and will be 
sorely missed. We wish Irene the best of luck in her retirement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. B. Doub, Chairman 

Francis J. Perry III, Clerk 

Bruce J. Beardsley, Third Member 



32 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the year ending December 31, 2002. 

The year 2002 was again a very sad year for the Medfield Police Department. Within 
four days of each other, the department found itself without two very experienced and 
dedicated officers. On May 30, 2002, Sgt Raymond J. Wheeler suffered a heart attack 
and was placed on indefinite sick leave. On June 2, 2002, Officer Robert E. Naughton 
died in a kayaking accident in Maine. Officer Naughton had been a police officer for 
27 years and court prosecutor for 10 years. He was a friend to both adults and 
children alike. In July Officer Dana P. Friend took over the job as Court Officer for 
the department. We wish him well in his new position. 

In the spring, a list was requested from Civil Service for the filling of the position left 
vacant by Sgt. Daniel McCarthy's death in September of 2000. On December 2, Eric 
W. Bazigian was hired as a full time police officer and entered the Police Academy in 
Quincy. 

Due to budgetary cuts, DARE/Safety Officer position has been slashed. 2003 will be 
our last year for DARE in the schools. The department will also be unable to provide 
Police Officers for field trips, canoe trips and bike trips in the future. We have lost our 
Administrative Sergeant and a Detective due to the cuts. 

I would like to thank all the Officers, Dispatchers and Civilian personnel of the 
Medfield Police Department who serve this community every day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
Chief of Police 



33 



The Police Department handled 7,598 calls for service in 2002. This is a summary of 
those calls. 



Accidents 


118 


Annoying Calls Complaint 


3 


Arrests 


49 


Arson 


1 


Assaults 


18 


Assists 


552 


Breaking and Entering 


17 


Burglar Alarms 


588 


Citations Issued 


996 


Civil/Family Problems 


24 


Disturbance Calls 


74 


Drug Offenses 


9 


Fire Alarms Answered 


176 


Larceny 


51 


Malicious Damage 


29 


Medical Calls 


489 


Messages Delivered 


31 


Mischief 


148 


Miscellaneous Complaints Answered 


698 


Missing Patients -MSH 


5 


Missing Patients Returned - MSH 


5 


Missing Persons Reported 


5 


Missing Persons Returned 


5 


Parking Tickets Issued 


66 


Protective Custody 


3 


Runaways 





Sex Offenses 


2 


Stolen Cars 


3 


Sudden Deaths 


3 


Traffic/Vehicle Complaints 


358 



34 



MEDFIELD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the year ending December 31, 2002. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency provides coordination between the 
Selectmen, Town Departments, the Massachusetts Emergency Agency and the Federal 
Emergency Agency. 

The Medfield Emergency Agency is divided into two sections. One section, the 
Management Group contains amateur radio operators, a transport section and shelter 
management people. The second section contains the auxiliary police officers. Both 
groups are under the control of the Emergency Management Agency Director/Chief of 
Police. 

The emergency management section maintains backup communication systems, 
provides transportation to the shelter and runs shelter operations in case of 
emergencies where people would need temporary shelter due to power outages or 
other such storm damage. The auxiliary police unit provides additional manpower to 
the police department during emergencies and large events such as parades and other 
large public gatherings. As in past years, both groups combined donated over 1,000 
man-hours of community service to the town. 

Since 9/11, this agency has also started to receive training from both state and federal 
agencies in regards to anti-terrorist responses. We have also written several grants 
requesting funds to update old equipment and to purchase some communication 
equipment to make contact with the state agencies more efficient. Homeland Security 
has become a major focal point of both funding and training. 

Our agency's major concern this year is the closing of the Medfield State Hospital. 
Because our headquarters is located on the hospital grounds, we may have to relocate 
if we are unable to be accommodated in the reuse of these facilities. It is important for 
our headquarters to be located away from the dispatch centers we might have to 
replace in a disaster. 



35 



I would like to thank the men and women of the department for their continued 
support and contribution throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael Sullivan, his staff and the Medfield Police Department for their 
assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
Chief of Police 



36 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER/INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer and Animal Inspector from 
January 1 through December 31, 2002. 

Total animal control calls from 1/1/02 - 12/31/02 2,975 

Total animal control incidents 635 

(Incidents include removing bats from houses, searching for dogs running loose 
and helping people with animal related problems not listed below) 

Licenses dogs returned to their owners 106 

Number of citations issued 76 



Number of animals hit by cars 193 

Cats 37 

Dogs 12 

Raccoons 39 

Deer 29 

Skunks 38 

Other (rabbits, woodchucks, etc.) 38 

Number of sick/injured wildlife destroyed by ACO 57 

Raccoons 21 

Deer 5 

Skunk 9 

Other (bats, opossums, squirrels, birds) 22 

NOTE: All sick wildlife are presumed to be rabid, and are incinerated. There were five 
animals tested for rabies with two positive results. 

Number of cats adopted 1 5 

Number of kittens adopted 62 

Number of dogs adopted 8 

Number of rabbits adopted 2 

There were five dog bites and three cat bites, each requiring a minimum 10-day 

quarantine. There were twenty-six cats and eight dogs placed in forty-five day 
quarantines for wounds of unknown origin. 



37 



All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of the Town of 
Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals and barns are 
in the best condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 2002: 

Beef Cows 3 

Donkeys 2 

Goats 2 

Horses 99 

Ponies 4 

Mini-horse 1 

Poultry 78 

Sheep 8 

Waterfowl 15 

I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department, Main Street Veterinary Hospital and Heritage Hill 
Veterinary Clinic. Thank you to my current Assistant Animal Control Officers, 
Elaine Yoke, Melissa Savilonis and also Paul Hogan who have been available as a fill- 
in for the past three years. Mary Louise Secola and Janice Sherbertes both moved too 
far away to continue working for the town. I will miss their dedication to the animals 
and the town. I also want to thank the Medfield residents for their ongoing donations 
and support of the animals at the Medfield Animal Shelter. Without them I could not 
have saved the nineteen cats, sixty-four kittens and three dogs that were adopted this 
year. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Jennifer Shaw Gates 
Animal Control Officer 
Animal Inspector 



38 



MEDFIELD 
FIRE -RESCUE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2002. 

Fire Department 

The Fire Department continues to be very busy. After a year in which we had no major 
property losses, on January 2 nd we responded to a "fully involved" structure fire. 
Following this event we responded to five more structure fires, all of which suffered 
major damage. Although there were significant property losses, there was only one 
minor injury to a resident. In July we responded to a report of a wire down on Main 
St., this event sent a surge through the overhead power lines resulting in fifteen calls 
for reports of wires burning in homes in a matter of minutes. This event caused one 
structure fire and a lot of damaged electrical components around town. Our responses 
to other calls were many and varied. These calls included CO investigations, lockouts, 
motor vehicle accidents, alarm investigations and four searches for missing persons. 

Training continues to be a priority. This year in addition to our two monthly training 
sessions, the Mass Fire academy conducted training in Firefighter Survival Skills, 
Leadership Strategies and Rapid Intervention training. We were fortunate to be able to 
use a structure scheduled for demolition to enhance these training sessions. 

This year we were fortunate to receive three grant awards. A $2400 grant for confined 
space rescue equipment was from the Mass Interlocal Insurance Assoc, a State Grant 
of $21,000 to be used for Fire & Rescue equipment and a $67,000 Federal Fire Act 
grant to build a mobile air supply unit. All of the equipment purchased through these 
Grants will enhance the safety of our firefighters. In November, Engine 3 was sent out 
to be refurbished and converted into our Rescue response truck. It is due to be 
completed in the early part of 2003. The rest of our equipment is in good shape for 
now. We worked closely this year with the Municipal Planning & Building Committee 
to identify our space needs. Although the funding for a project of this nature is not 
readily available, I am glad that we have at least documented that our forty-year-old 
building is in dire need of an update to include more space. 

The three school building projects are keeping us busy. We are working closely with 
all the engineers, architects and contractors to ensure the buildings are done properly 
and safely for the occupants that are in them during construction. With the State 
Hospital scheduled to close in 2003, we will be monitoring the closing of all the 
buildings. Fire prevention inspections were conducted throughout the year at various 
facilities in town. 



39 



Ambulance 

The Ambulance responded to over five hundred and seventy calls for assistance this 
year. We responded to the aid of neighboring communities fifty-five times while 
receiving aid twenty-six times due to multiple runs. 

In March, due to a restructuring of the Police Department staff we no longer had the 
services of the billing secretary. Due to the new and ever changing health care policies 
and reimbursement procedures it was no longer feasible to continue to do our own 
billing in-house. The billing is now being done by Comstar Inc., a company widely 
used in the Ambulance service. We are anticipating that our ambulance fee collections 
will increase. 

Our new equipment purchases this year included two new defibrillators and a new 
stair chair that will ease the EMT's removal of patients over stairwells. 

Throughout the year members trained in various aspects of emergency medicine. 
Hands on drills in vehicle extrication and rescues from a rooftop were also conducted. 

I would like to thank all the men and women of the department who serve as 
Firefighters and /or Emergency Medical Technicians. I look forward to their continued 
commitment in serving our community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury 
Fire Chief 



40 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 2002 



AMBULANCE 










Total Calls 


573 








Transports To: 


Metrowest Natick 


259 


Caritas Norwood 


149 




Metrowest Framingham 


14 


Newton Wellesley 


29 




Deaconess Glover 


12 


Mass General 







Brigham and Women's 





Children's Hospital 







Other 


10 







Advanced Life Support 

Metrowest 227 Caritas Norwood 98 Dept. ALS 52 



Other Services Medflight 3 Standby 15 Cancelled/Refusals 96 

Mutual Aid Rendered 55 Received 26 

Details 6 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Alarms 

Accidental/System Malfunction 



122 



Box 




216 






False 




126 






Still 




309 






Residential 




109 






Services 










Ambulance Assist 


132 




Haz-mat 


60 


Appliances 


7 




Investigations 


288 


Brush and Grass 


12 




Motor Vehicles 


5 


Burners Oil 


10 




Motor Vehicle Accidents 


65 


Gas 


4 




Mutual Aid Rendered 


13 


Carbon Monoxide Alarms 







Received 


5 


Details 







Police Assist 


5 


Dumpsters 












41 



Services (continued) 








Electrical 


13 


Responses to MSH 





Fuel Spills 


12 


Station Coverage 


5 


Gas Leaks/Investigations 


32 


Structures 


19 


Med-Flight 


3 


Storm Related 


36 


Fireworks 


1 


Searches 


4 


Public Assistance 




Permits Issued 




Lock Outs 


32 


Blasting 


24 


Pumping Cellars 


3 


Bonfire 


1 


Water Problems 


15 


Burning 


353 


Other 


38 


Fuel Storage 


16 






Spinkler Inst/Alt 


5 






Propane Storage 


19 


Inspections 








Blasting 


653 


U/Tank Removal 


3 


Fire Prevention 


71 


Fire Alarm Inst. 


5 


Fuel Storage 


12 


Tank Truck 


13 


New Residential 


32 






Smoke Detectors New 


21 






Resale 


202 






Oil Burners 


18 






Wood Stoves 


6 






U/Tank Removal 


3 







42 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 2002: 



Department 


Permits 


Inspections 


Income 


Expenses 




2002 


2001 


2002 


2001 


2002 


2001 


2002 


2001 


Building 


396 


338 


1,886 


1,660 


$183,297 


$96,850 


$42,770 


$43,469 


Plumbing 


227 


211 


429 


286 


12,800 


9,955 


8,393 


6,592 


Gas 


197 


180 


190 


205 


5,960 


4,895 


4,707 


4,575 


Wiring 


395 


383 


724 


527 


33,441 


21,300 


17,709 


12,899 



Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the calendar year 2002 
were $231,498.00 as compared to $133,506.00in 2001. Expenses for 2002 were $73,579.00 
as compared to $67,535.00 in 2001. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 1 6 

Multi Family (Condominiums) 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 

Additions to private dwellings 94 

Renovations to private dwellings 105 

Additions & renovations to business/industrial buildings 24 

New industrial/business buildings 2 

Family Apartments 

2 Family Apartments 

Shingling roof & installation of sidewalls 5 8 

Private swimming pools 12 

Accessory buildings 1 1 

Residential garages 2 

Demolitions 19 

Tents (temporary) & Construction trailers 7 

Signs 14 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 9 

TOTAL 373 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 22 new residences in 2002, as compared to 19 
in 2001. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, nursing 
homes and nursery schools amounted to 38 inspections for 2002. 



43 



2001 


2002 


$5,620,500 


$7,186,000 


7,022,056 


8,675,882 


260,000 


181,000 


1,177,640 


43,087,500 





















Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

New Dwellings 

Renovations and additions, pools, shingling, side walls, etc. 

on residential 
New Construction business and industry 

Renovations and additions business and industry 
Multi-family dwellings 
Two family dwellings 
Family Apartments 

Whether you are planning to add a pool, a deck, reshingle, apply siding or install 
replacement windows, most changes to your home require a building permit. These 
comprehensive building laws may seem cumbersome, but they are meant to benefit us 
all by monitoring the building and development activities in our community. Please, 
also remember that the placement of any type of structure, as simple as a tool shed 
(accessory building) on your property must adhere to the rules and regulations of the 
Medfield Zoning Bylaws, and in most cases a building permit is required. Before you 
proceed with any changes to your home or property, please call the Inspection 
Department at the Town Hall (359-8505, ext. 603) and we will help you get started in 
the process of applying for a permit. 

Enforcement of the State Building Code (780 CMR - 6th Edition) continues to be the 
responsibility of the local building inspectors. Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring 
contractors to be registered with the Commonwealth became the responsibility of the 
Inspection Department staff to institute procedural changes for compliance. The 
office of the Inspection Department also keeps an accurate registration of builders 
holding State Construction Supervisor's licenses in order to assure compliance with 
Section 109.1.1 of the State Building Code. The building inspectors continue the 
enforcement to the code by making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as 
well as other places of assembly on a periodic basis. 

The Inspectors of Buildings also serve the town in the capacity of Enforcing Officers 
for Zoning and as such, made 120 inspections to investigate complaints and inquiries 
brought to their attention by residents as well as other town boards and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections was greatly 
appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in 
new construction and in additions and renovations as well as inspecting the installation 
of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are reminded of the importance of having 
their wood stove installations inspected and certified in accordance with requirements 
of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

Thank you, Anthony Calo who has served the town for 19 years as Building Inspector. 
Judy Cahill retired as Administrative Assistant to all the Inspectors for over 12 years. 



44 



Thank you Judy for your dedication, and expertise. Welcome to Pat Iafolla- Walsh, 
new Administrative Secretary, and to Christopher Cronin and William Krawec, 
Assistant Building Inspectors. A special thanks again this year to Christine Kenney 
and Margaret Warren for their continued help in this office. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to administer, 
investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. 
Homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas permits. Permits can only be issued to 
a licensed Journeyman or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, 
altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas has 
issued a permit. The Inspection Department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a citizen of 
the town requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the 
assurance that the installation will not only be installed correctly and safely, but also 
that the work will be installed by a professional and not exploited by non 
professionals. It is definitely in the homeowner's interest to insist on inspections by 
qualified town inspectors knowledgeable in their trade. It is money well spent in times 
where every penny counts. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give the 
consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices, where necessary, to 
insure the continuance of the good clean potable water of which we are very proud in 
Medfield. 

The assistance of John Fratolillo was greatly appreciated again this year. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code as well as 
the National Electric Code in his inspections of wiring installations for which permits 
are issued. Residents are reminded that the permitting process is in effect to assure 
safe and correct installations. Congratulations to Joseph Erskine for 50 years of 
service to the town of Medfield. 

Thank you this year to Joseph Wallace and Joseph Erskine for their assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
James Leonard, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



45 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 2002. 

Measuring devices tested and sealed as required by Massachusetts law: 



Weighing scales and balances 32 

Weights 52 

Liquid measuring meters (in gasoline pumps) 71 

Linear measures 3 



Ninety-three related inspections were made during the year. Two civil citations were 
issued and one $50 fine was levied. 

Revenue received was $3,163.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael J. Clancy 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



46 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is the Annual Report for the Cemetery Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2002. 

For the year 2002, the Cemetery Department continued its efforts in the maintenance 
of the cemetery grounds. We continued with the fertilization and liming program for 
the turf grass as well as insect and grub control. 

Because of the dry summer, a few of the older trees had to be removed despite the use 
of a drip irrigation system. These trees will be replaced in the spring. 

In the main part of the cemetery, all the monuments that were tilted or sinking were 
straightened and brought to grade. In addition some restoration work was done in the 
old historic section. Approximately a quarter of these monuments were straightened. 

There were seventy one interments and eighty nine burial plots sold during the year 
2002. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence Whitestone 
Cemetery Superintendent 



47 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40, the 
Department of Environmental Protection's Stormwater Management Policy and the 
Medfield Wetland Bylaw, Article IX, are administered by the Conservation Commission. 
These laws protect the wetlands and waterways of Medfield. The functions of these laws 
are to safeguard public surface and groundwater supplies and to prevent damage from 
flooding by preserving floodplains, swamps and bogs, streams and other water bodies, and 
certain types of land adjoining them. Under the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw, vernal pools 
and a 50-foot no-disturb buffer area are protected resource areas. Anyone proposing to 
alter a wetland or land subject to flooding, or to perform work within 100 feet of a 
wetland or bank, or within 200 feet of a river or perennial stream must file with the 
Conservation Commission. The riverfront resource area extends 200 feet on each side of a 
perennial stream, brook, or river. Medfield has two major rivers: the Charles River and 
the Stop River and numerous perennial streams and brooks. Anyone wishing to work 
within these protected areas must satisfy the Commission that the proposed work would 
not significantly harm the resources. Before any work is begun, the Commission must 
make a determination that these laws either: (i) do not apply; (ii) apply and the work may 
be performed under conditions the Commission imposes as a Determination of 
Applicability or an Order of Conditions; (iii) apply and the work may be performed 
without conditions. 

The Commission is largely self-funded through the permit fees charged under the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Medfield Wetland Bylaw. The 
Commission's fees are consistent with those charged in comparable towns. The Town 
benefits from the Wetlands Protection laws and their associated regulations by protecting 
Medfield' s wetlands from pollution, nutrient overloading and encroachment and by 
providing guidance and consistency to applicants with regards to the Commission's rules 
and regulations for various construction projects. The Commission's preeminent concern 
is to ensure that the eight interests of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the 
Medfield Wetlands Bylaw are upheld. The eight important public interests or values are: 
protection of public and private water supply, protection of groundwater supply, flood 
control, storm damage prevention, prevention of pollution, protection of land containing 
shellfish, protection of fisheries and protection of wildlife habitat, 

Enforcement activities by the Commission have included various investigations to 
determine whether applicable laws have been violated, the causes of the violations and 
explore the remedies for damage to wetland resource areas, including ponds, streams, 
brooks, wetlands vegetation and wildlife habitat. The Commission has issued several 



48 



notices of violation to developers and others when construction activities have endangered 
wetlands resources protected by state and local laws. Often violations are reported by 
conscientious and alert neighbors. These violations generally have been remedied to the 
satisfaction of the Commission. 

In 2002, the Commission held 18 public meetings for the purpose of: 10 Requests for 
Determinations of Applicability, 3 continued Requests for a Determination of 
Applicability, 20 Notices of Intent, 26 continued hearings for Notices of Intent, 1 
Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation, 1 amendment to an exiting Order of 
Conditions, 3 Enforcement actions, and 18 informal reviews, project updates and 
presentations. The Commission issued the following formal decisions: 8 Negative 
Determinations of Applicability, 1 Positive Determination of Applicability, 10 Orders of 
Conditions, 10 Certificates of Compliance, 1 Partial Certificate of Compliance, and 5 
Extensions. The Conservation Officer handled 1 ,798 telephone calls during the year. The 
voice mail system continues to provide the public with a beneficial communication tool 
with the Commission. The number of phone calls processed through the Conservation 
Office increases approximately 1 80 calls per year. The Commission issued no 'citations' 
for wetlands bylaw violations during 2002. We anticipate that the year 2003 will continue 
to be active for the Commission as planning continues for various subdivisions, and the 
scope of review continues to change within the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the DEP Stormwater Management Policy. 

Leslee Willitts continues to serve as the Conservation Officer. The position is a 
permanent part-time salaried position with a minimum of 20 hours per week and is 
generally funded entirely by the fees collected from applicants. The Conservation Office 
is located on the second floor of Town Hall, Room 209 and is open on Wednesdays and 
Thursdays. The Conservation Officer is responsible for site inspections, investigation of 
violations, inquiries from the public, residents and applicants concerning the Commission, 
the Wetland laws and regulations, and procedures of the Commission. Presently the 
Commission has approximately 98 open projects that require monitoring by the 
Conservation Officer. Each Notice of Intent results in a minimum of four site inspections 
during the life of the project. The overall scope of the project and the amount of resource 
areas impacted by the project may require additional inspections to determine compliance 
with the Conditions issued. Fieldwork is consistent with the number of telephone 
inquiries and the amount of assistance needed by residents and developers concerning 
possible wetlands issues. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of wetlands protection, the Commission is 
charged by the Conservation Commission Act to actively protect the watershed resources 
of the town and for the promotion and development of the natural resources of the town. 
The Commission actively pursues the acquisition of land for conservation and passive 
recreation use. The Commission provides support to the Open Space Committee in its 



49 



efforts to identify and acquire parcels of open land for the Town, and coordinates with the 
Planning Board in its consideration of subdivisions with significant wetlands 
implications. According to the records in the Assessors office, the Conservation 
Commission has a total of 72 properties under its jurisdiction. These properties are small 
single lots within neighborhoods and larger land holdings such as the Holmquist Farm 
Conservation Land consisting of many parcels of land. The Commission can also 
manage Conservation Restrictions that are donated to the town. 

The Conservation Commission has initiated the development of land management plans 
for its various properties. The management plans for the Holmquist Farm Conservation 
Land and the Danielson Pond Conservation Land are the initial plans underway. As part 
of that management, the Commission has installed a property identification sign at the 
Holmquist Farm Conservation Land. Rules and regulations signs and boundary markers 
were installed at various other conservation properties throughout town. 

In keeping with the agricultural intent for the Holmquist Farm Conservation Land on 
Plain Street, the Commission welcomed the Medfield Community Gardens as a 
permanent user of the land. The Commission entered into an agreement with the 
Community Gardens organization to allow one of fallow agricultural fields to be 
reactivated for raising produce. The relationship with the Thunder Hill 4-H Club remains 
active. The club continues to express their interest in using a small section of the land for 
raising sheep. Both of these activities are consistent with the intended agricultural purpose 
for the property. Commissioners Deborah Bero and I. Lorah Igo are developing the 
management plan for the farm and will incorporate the 4H Club sheep project and the 
Community Gardens into that plan. 

During 2002, the Conservation Commission received two Conservation Restrictions 
(CR). These CR's are for property at 609 Main Street and 62 Bridge Street. Both of these 
CR's have met the stringent requirements of the Massachusetts Division of Conservation 
Services Office under the direction of Joel Lerner. 

For the third year, the Conservation Commission joined numerous communities throughout 
the Commonwealth in the annual celebration of Massachusetts Biodiversity Days. The 
Executive Office of Environmental Affairs encourages communities to search and record as 
many different species of plants and animals within its boundaries. The Commission 
sponsored two events this year: 1) "Beavers, Beavers and more Beavers*' - an educational 
event to help the people of Medfield understand the habits and habitats of the beaver. 2) 
"Encouraging Wild Places" - an Ecopsychologist and Herbalist, Lesley Shore, invited the 
public to visit her private nature sanctuary, Harmony Farm, and learn the benefits of 
encouraging a wild area around your home. 



50 



The presence of beaver communities within Medfield's wetland systems is an on-going and 
persistent problem. Beavers and their habitats are protected by law. Before any alteration to 
a beaver dam can be performed, a permit must be obtained from the Conservation 
Commission. Unless an emergency to health and safety is declared by the Board of Health, 
beaver dams and ultimately their habitat are protected. The Medfield Board of Health and 
the Commission continue to work cooperatively to address this situation. For the immediate 
future, beavers will continue to impact the landscape of Medfield. 

Volunteers Betty Kaerwer, Theresa Cos, John Kelly and Ralph Parmigiane continue to 
provide the Commission with updates, reviews and inventory of the properties under its 
jurisdiction. They walked various properties marking the boundaries *and public access 
points, assessing the general characteristics of each property, and preparing accurate files 
for each property. These volunteers provide much needed office support for the 
Conservation Officer on a weekly basis. 

All members of the Commission attend various workshops and training sessions offered 
by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Massachusetts Association 
of Conservation Commissioners (MACC) throughout the year. These workshops enable 
the Commissioners to keep current with the most up-to-date information and regulations 
for wetlands protection and land acquisition and management. A "Fundamentals of 
Conservation Commissioners" and an "Advanced Certificate Training Program are 
offered by MACC. Several Commissioners are participating in these Certificate 
programs. 

The Commission established a study group to develop guidelines for Conservation 
Restrictions, easements and trail development in 2000. The study group is composed of 
the following: Osier Peterson, Board of Selectmen; George Lester, Planning Board; 
Philip Burr, Conservation Commission; Thomas Caragliano, Park & Recreation, Chris 
Hajjar, Open Space Committee; Lynn Browne, Friends of Forests and Trails; and Jeff 
Montgomery, The Trustees of Reservations. Commissioner Philip Burr served as the 
Chairman of the study group. In 2001 the study group completed a document titled: 
"Trail Specifications Guidelines". The Commission wishes to express their heartfelt 
thanks to the committee for their time and talents in completing this guide for the 
Commission. 

Regrettably this year, the Commission received the resignations of Mary McCarthy and 
Beth Larkin. Their expertise and professionalism were positive assets to the functions of 
the Commission. On behalf of the town, the Commission thanks them for their collective 
years of service protecting the wetland resources and open space of Medfield. 

The Commission welcomes two new commissioners, Robert E. Kennedy, Jr. and Bruce 
Redfield. Mr. Kennedy is a life long resident of Medfield. As an employee of the Public 
Works Department, he brings a vast knowledge of the town's infrastructure and 
stormwater management to the Commission. Mr. Redfield is an environmental engineer 



51 



with experience in hazardous waste and wastewater treatment. His knowledge in these 
areas will provide the Commission with valued insight. 

The Conservation Commission meets on the first and third Thursdays of the month. The 
Commission generally holds site inspections on weekend mornings. Several high school 
students have monitored the Commission's meetings as requirements for government 
studies. During its regular meetings, Commission has advised and assisted with various 
Boy Scout Eagle projects. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph A. Parmigiane, Chairman 

Michael Perloff, Vice-Chairman 

Deborah J. Bero 

Philip J. Burr 

I. Lorah Igo 

Robert E. Kennedy, Jr. 

Bruce C. Redfield 

Associate Members: 
Theresa A. Cos 
Betty A. Kaerwer 
Caroline D. Standley 

Volunteer Assistant: John Kelly 



52 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The final step in the completion of the town's updated Open Space and Recreation Plan 
was achieved when notification was received that it has been accepted by the State. After 
nearly two years of preparation, this was a major milestone. The Open Space Committee 
is indebted to Assistant Town Administrator Kristine Trierweiler for her many, many 
hours of work on the report and her valuable expertise and counsel. 

The 2002 Goldthwait Award for open space preservation was presented to Drs. Randolph 
and Marian Catlin in June. The Catlins have lived on North Street for many years. Their 
property encompasses woodlands and wetlands lying within a well protection district, and 
includes areas of waterfront along North Brook. In addition, their land directly abuts a 
large conservation area which extends from Medfield into Dover. Recognizing the 
importance of the environmental resources contained in their property, the Catlins have 
given the town a conservation restriction on their land. In so doing they have not only 
helped to protect our water supply and groundwater, but have also enhanced the 
neighboring parcel of open space on the Medfield/Dover town line. The trail system in 
the area will be further safeguarded for public use and a valuable wildlife corridor will be 
conserved. 

As in the past, The Open Space Committee continues to work with the Conservation 
Commission, the Friends of Medfield Forests and Trails, the Bay Circuit Alliance, the 
Medfield State Hospital Preservation Committee, the Upper Charles Conservation land 
trust, and similar groups throughout the region on areas of mutual interest and concern. 

We welcome input from all the residents of Medfield and encourage you to get in touch 
with us to share your knowledge and suggestions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jonathan Bennett 
Chris Hajjar 
Lorah Igo 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Eric O'Brien 
Martha Smick 
Caroline Standley 



53 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Our 
job is to identify and protect Medfield' s historical and archaeological assets. We 
make sure historic preservation is considered in community planning and development 
decisions. The commission has an annual budget of some $2,500, and it has certain 
statutory authority. Its monthly meetings in the town hall are open to the public. 

We are proud of the work we do for Medfield and feel we deliver a long of bang for 
the buck. Along with many other groups, we work proactively to preserve those 
qualities of the town that residents say they want, which helps preserve property 
values. We commend the local history programs in the schools that help younger 
people learn to respect this old town. We contrast Medfield with what one 
commission member saw on a recent visit to southern France - rampant vandalism, 
especially with spray paint, on beautiful cathedrals and other public buildings many 
centuries old. 

(The Medfield Historical Society, with which the commission is often confused, is a 
private, not-for-profit organization of history enthusiasts.) 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

Medfield is one of relatively few Massachusetts communities with a demolition delay 
bylaw. It prevents historically significant buildings - non-renewable resources — from 
being demolished before serious efforts have been made to rehabilitate or restore 
them. The bylaw URL is http://www.tovvn.medfield.net/Bylavvs.pdf 

The commission reviews every application to demolish buildings over 50 years old. It 
investigates and holds hearings on those that may be historically significant. If a 
building is then classed "preferably preserved," its demolition may delayed up to a 
year, during which time it is hoped the petitioner will find a way to rehab it. 

Several demolition permits were sought and investigated. The only delay imposed was 
on one of the Pine Street barns that are such an important part of the streetscape, and 
perhaps the last surviving link to the agrarian past in that section of town. Among the 
others, we did an unusually long investigation and soul-searching on an 1840 Greek 
Revival house on Harding Street before voting 5-1 to let it go. 

CLG Status Helps Make Medfield's a Top Local Historical Commission 

Thanks to its CLG (Certified Local Government) status, Medfield has received many 
survey and planning grants from the state and federal governments in recent years. 



54 



The Massachusetts Historical Commission continues to encourage us to apply because 
they believe we put the money to good use. 

In 2003 we will seek a grant to prepare a plan to restore the old part of Vine Lake 
Cemetery. If approved, the town would end up paying 40% of the planning cost, and 
the state would pay 60%. Thereafter we would plan to seek a Massachusetts 
Preservation Projects Fund (MPPF) grant, which would reimburse us for 50% of the 
cost of restoration work. We feel Vine Lake, which abuts the Metcalf Historic 
District, is a critical historic asset of the town, and restoration would be a bargain. 

For our survey and planning work, our demolition delay activism, MAAC, and other 
activities, the Massachusetts Historical Commission has long pointed to Medfield as a 
model for other historical commissions. 

Great Architectural History Booklet Still Available! 

Kathleen Kelly Broomer, who prepared Medfield' s 100+ page Historic Preservation 
Plan in 1999, has expanded and updated our popular Walking Tour of Medfield 
brochure. This is a 48-page booklet filled with the history and architecture of the 
houses and other structures near the center of town, written in Broomer' s highly 
readable style. The booklets are available at the library, Lord's, real estate offices, and 
from the Historical Commission and Historical Society. 

Want a Date Sign for Your House? 

Many residents ask how to get a date sign for their house. The procedure is simple: 

1. Submit your request in the form of a brief note to the Medfield Historical 
Commission. Attach copies of documentation (such as property records from the 
Registry of Deeds in Dedham) showing when the house was built and the name of 
the original owner. 

2. If it believes the information is accurate, the historical commission will approve 
your request. 

3. Take the letter to Abell Sign, 37 Janes Avenue. The homeowner pays for the sign. 

Medfield Archaeological Advisory Committee (MAAC) 

The Medfield Archaeology Advisory Committee was formed in 1993 as a 
subcommittee of the Medfield Historical Commission. It was formed to help protect 
archaeologically-sensitive areas in town. 

MAAC members are John A. Thompson, Chairman; Electa Tritsch; Barbara Palson; 
Debbie Gaines; C. B. Doub; Jackie Wile; Barbara Leighton; and Burgess P. Standley. 

On an ongoing basis, the committee maintains and updates a map of the 
archaeologically-sensitive areas, helps protect the sites, evaluates and registers 



55 



artifacts, and provides educational services. Since 1997, MAAC has conducted 
archaeological field activities on town property supervised by a volunteer professional 
archaeologist. 

In 2002, MAAC completed an archaeological dig (report pending) on town-owned 
land behind the Wheelock School and investigated other land at the Wheelock School 
in anticipation of expansion of the soccer fields. In 2002, MAAC also conducted a dig 
under a state permit from MHC at the Dwight-Derby house prior to construction of a 
new breezeway; a report is in the works. Artifacts found during the excavation will be 
on display at the house during 2003. 

MAAC mourns the death of long-time member Robert Naughton in 2002. Bob was an 
important member of the committee who gave many hours to our work; he is greatly 
missed. 

MAAC welcomes inquiries from anyone who thinks a property in Medfield is 
threatened; please contact John A. Thompson or any other member. 

Want to join our commission? 

In 2002 we welcomed new member Jonathan Gray, but as this is written, the historical 
commission has two vacancies from the resignations of Monica Bushnell and Mary 
Preikszas. If you're interested in Medfield's history, call any of the members, or show 
up at one of our monthly public meetings, and let's get to know each other. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Temple, Co-chair 
Daniel Bibel, Co-chair 
Jonathan Gray 
Burgess P. Standley 
Ancelin Wolfe 



56 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield: 

OVERVIEW 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's four Historic Districts: 

• The John Metcalf Historic District established in 1989 on West Main Street and 
enlarged in 1996. 

• The Hospital Farm Historic District established in 1994. 

• The Clark-Kingsbury Farm Historic District established in 1997. 

• The Medfield Town Center Historic District established in 2000 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing body is granted 
under the Historic District Act of 1960, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C. 
The purpose of the law is threefold: 

• to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of buildings and places 
significant in the history of the Commonwealth and its cities and towns 

• to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places 

• to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the district 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to protect the 
character of historic areas. Town-appointed Local Historic Commissions govern such 
districts. Since each property owner within a district contributes to the overall historic 
character, changes proposed for the exterior of any property, as well as new 
construction, are considered in light of the impact they may have on the district as a 
whole. Before a property owner within a district is allowed to change an exterior 
architectural feature of a building, the owner must receive approval from the Local 
Historic Commission. Approval is in the form of a certificate of appropriateness, 
hardship or non-applicability with respect to such construction or alteration. 

There are now Local Historic Districts in over one hundred Massachusetts towns and 
cities. Historic Districts do not prevent changes from occurring, nor do they prevent 
new construction. The intent of any Local Historic District is not to halt growth, but to 
allow for thoughtful consideration of change, to allow changes and additions that are 
harmonious, and prevent the intrusion of incongruous elements that might distract 
from the aesthetic and historic values of the district. Local Historic District 
Commissions have authority only over the portion of the exterior of a building that can 



57 



be seen from a public street, way or park. The Commission's Guidelines for Changes 
within Medfield Local Historic Districts is available upon request. 

HISTORIC DISTRICTS IN MEDFIELD 

Medfield passed "Historic Districts", Article 14 of the bylaws, and created the John 
Metcalf Historic District through a vote of the 1989 annual Town Meeting. This first 
district included for historic houses on west Main Street and included the oldest 
portion of Vine Lake Cemetery. Through a vote of the annual Town Meeting in 1996, 
the John Metcalf Historic District was enlarged to include a total of sixteen historic 
buildings. 

The Town established a second historic district, The Hospital Farm Historic District, 
in 1994. It includes 33 buildings at the Medfield State Hospital, and the surrounding 
historic landscape. The buildings were built at the turn of this century, mostly in the 
Queen Anne Revival style, and are grouped around a large quadrangle, resembling the 
campus of a small college. 

In 1997, the Clark- Kingsbury Farm Historic District, Medfield' s third district, was 
established. It provides protection to the historic and unique grouping of the 18 th 
century Clark-Kingsbury farmhouse, outbuildings and pond with gristmill that forms a 
widely appreciated and essential part of the rural character of Medfield. 

In April of 2000, the Medfield Town Center Historic District was created by 
unanimous vote of Town Meeting. This proposed district is intended to preserve and 
protect the character of the Center of the town of Medfield. 

The Town Center of Medfield is important for its mix of civic, commercial, and 
residential properties. Each category has an integral function in the town and over the 
years as the town has developed, each building, in its own unique way, has been 
significant in the developing character of the Town Center. While the other historic 
districts in Medfield are primarily residential, an unusual aspect of this proposed 
historic district is the concentration of civic and commercial buildings in addition to its 
residential ones. Historically, where the civic buildings provided the center of town 
government, education, religious and social activity, the industrial and commercial 
buildings served as the hub of Medfield's active and developing economy. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 

• The Commission issued 4 Certificates of Appropriateness for structures within the 
John Metcalf Historic District. These included applications for additions to 661 
and 671 Main Street, an application to move, relocate and renovate 609 Main 
Street and an application for exterior repairs to 589 Main Street. 

• The Commission issued one Certificate of Appropriateness for a structure within 
the Medfield Town Center Historic District. 



58 



• The Commission has been actively participating in discussions relevant to the 
changes happening with the State Hospital. 

• We are always interested in assisting residents in the creation of new historic 
districts for their neighborhoods and always looking for volunteers to help with our 
efforts. 



Respectfully submitted, 



David Sharff, Chair 
Barbara Jacobs 
Burgess Standley 
Connie Sweeney 
Michael Taylor 



59 



KEEPERS OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Keepers of the Town Clock are pleased to submit their annual report for the year 
2002. 

As usual, the Keepers continue to maintain the clock at high horological standards. In 
mid March the clock underwent its annual overhaul. The bushings, bearings and drive 
shafts of the second story gear train were applied with a Teflon application, while the 
bearings, gears and going train of the main clock works received a heavier application 
of grease. 

The Town Clock needed very little tending after its overhaul through September. 
However, the fall months proved unkind to the Town Clock. Co-keeper David Maxson 
noticed in September the South East clock face not running. The drive mechanism had 
pulled itself from the outside wall and began to bind. The clock shaft was shored up 
with a shim, which corrected the problem. David Maxson will design and install a new 
mounting bracket shortly. 

The Christmas storm of 2002 caused the clock to seize at 4:30. Clearing ice from the 
clock face visible from North Street freed up the drive shaft. After tourqing a sacrificial 
nut on the main drive shaft, the Town Clock became operational. The Co-Keepers are 
working on a clutch for the Town Clock to prevent breakdowns in the future. 

We have noticed some weathering to the outside clock faces and some general wear to 
the stairs leading to the clock works. In the interest of safety and preservation of the 
Town Clock, the Co-Keepers are seeking bids for the repair work. Sometime in the 
Spring of 2003 we would request a meeting with Town Officials to review the proposals 
and bids. 

David Maxson continued to provide the Annual 8 th Grade tour of the Town Clock and 
received a special visit from Gregory Vasale, a noted expert on New England Town 
Clock history. Mr. Vasale photographed the works and offered tips on maintenance. 

The Keepers of the Town Clock would like to thank the Residents of Medfield and the 
Selectmen for their continued support in the care and maintenance of their Town Clock. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marc R. Ti shier 
David P. Maxson 
Co-Keepers of the Town Clock 

60 



k TH 



350'" ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield, 

In 2002 this committee wrapped up its work with two final events: a "thank you" party 
at the Pfaff Center, orchestrated by Megan Sullivan and Ed Doherty, to recognize the 
many volunteers who made our celebration possible, and a close-out sale of 
merchandise from the 1651 Shoppe. With our long party over, we would like to take 
this opportunity to share with you the final accounting of what it all cost. 

Our main source of funding was the $117,700 appropriation by the 1999 Town 
Meeting. At the time, we said that we viewed some of that as "seed money" and that 
we hoped to be able to return at least $20,000 to the town in the end. Happily, we 
were able to return closer to twice that amount, between the balance left in the town 
revolving account, which reverted automatically to the town's general fund on July 1, 
2002, and the balance left in the treasury of the Friends of Medfield's 350 th 
Anniversary Celebration, Inc., the nonprofit group we established to solicit 
contributions and lighten the burden on the Town Treasurer relating to our activities. 
The net cost to the town on the tax levy was thus $78,729 for a series of events whose 
total cost (not including many in-kind contributions and thousands of hours of 
volunteer labor) was $226,481. 

Original Appropriation from the Town of Medfield: $1 17,700 



Funds Raised through the "Friends: 




Donations and Sponsors: 


$108, 293 


Event Ticket Sales: 


$ 32,078 


Total: 


$140,371 


1651 Shoppe: 




Sales: 


$ 74,562 


Expenses: 


$(67,181) 


Net Income: 


$ 7,381 


Total Funds raised and Shoppe Income: 


$147,752 


Total Funds Available: 


$265,452 


Funds Spent by Event: 




350 Trees: 


$ 40,200 


Parade: 


35,610 


Publicity/ Administration: 


18,900 


Fireworks: 


13,324 


Birthday Faire: 


41,175 


Anniversary Gala: 


23,169 



61 



Last Night: 25,610 

House Tour: 2,027 

Veterans Exhibit 649 

Flower Exhibit: 220 

Vintage Clothing Exhibit: 
Quilts (325 th and 350 th ) Preservation and Framing: 4,625 

Downtown Banners: 5,113 

Cemetery Tour: 1,516 

Lantern Tour: 928 

Skinner Appraisal Day: 3,254 

Springfest: 6,661 

Donation: Medfield Historical Society: 1 ,000 

Donation: Friends of Dwight Derby House: 500 

Donation: Medfield Senior Citizens: 1 ,000 

Donation: Medfield Foundation: 1 ,000 



Total Funds Expensed: 

Balance remaining to be returned to Town: 



226,481 
38,971 



Disposition of remaining balance: 

Funds left in Town Account, reverted to General Fund 7/1/02: $ 6,971 

"Friends" Funds turned over to Town's General Fund: 28,000 

Earmarked for Future Town Sign Maintenance: 2,000 

375 th Anniversary Celebration: 1,000 

Fund for Antiquities: 1,000 



Total Returned to the Town: 



38,971 



Respectfully submitted, 



Nancy Horan, Chairman 

Ed Doherty, Vice Chairperson 

Megan Sullivan, Secretary 

Mark Fisher, Treasurer 

Lucille Fisher, Fundraising Chairperson 

Gail Currier, 1651 Shoppe 

Brandie Erb 

Donald Gabor 

Pauline Goucher 

Beverly Hallowell 

Chief Richard Hurley 

Connie Jones 

Chief William Kingsbury 

Nancy Kelly-Lavin 

William Mann 



Beth Oliphant 
Cheryl O'Malley 
Ed Otting 
Osier Peterson 
Patricia Rioux 
Ken Reiff 
Phyllis Scott 
Ann Thompson 
Deborah Wang 
Geralyn Warren 
Alice Wheeler 
Mark Wilson 
Gordon Youlden 
Bonnie Wren Burgess 



62 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is my pleasure to submit the 2002 annual report for the Medfield Memorial Public 
Library. The year 2002 marked a watershed for the Medfield Public Library. 
Circulation for fiscal year 2002 surpassed the 200,000 mark for the first time with a 
total direct circulation of 215,332 items being borrowed. Medfield ranked seventh out 
of the 54 libraries in our population group in Massachusetts. This was an increase of 
14 percent over the previous year. 

Library collections grew by nearly 6 percent to 66,170. Nearly every collection 
increased in both number of holdings and in circulation. Over 45% of holdings and 
circulation were in adult, young adult, and juvenile fiction. Nonfiction accounted for 
almost one- fifth of total circulation. The audiovisual collections represented one-third 
of total circulation. 

New technologies have increased the number and variety of audiovisual materials 
offered to the public: cassettes, compact discs, CD-ROM's, videos, DVD's and kits 
combining books with audiovisuals materials are now available. The Library started a 
"Bestsellers Club" to provide patrons a way to automatically reserve new adult 
hardcover fiction by over 100 best-selling authors. Multiple copies of titles are 
purchased so that no one has to wait very long to read their favorite authors. The club 
was an immediate success with over 130 patrons registering for the service. 

Circulation staff maintained a welcoming attitude and provided friendly assistance 
while averaging the second highest circulation per staff person for communities our 
size. The average number of items circulated by each full-time equivalent staff person 
was 23,432 for fiscal year 2002. Staff also assisted individuals in finding leisure 
reading materials, materials for research, and with general information and aid. 

Reference staff faced their own challenges during the course of the year. Besides 
assisting people with answers to reference questions, they aided in reader's advisory 
service, offered research assistance, and one-to-one instruction on navigating the 
Internet and processing. They also assisted in finding and requesting materials from 
other libraries around the country and in locating information in online databases. 
Reference staff kept the public Internet and catalog computers and printers running 
throughout the year. Working with school librarians and teachers to supplement 
curriculum needs of students was another important function for reference staff. 

Children were omnipresent throughout the library during the year. Of course, their 
favorite area was the Children's Department filled with their most wanted books and 
audiovisual materials. Children's Librarians, Ann Russo and Jean Todesca, 



63 



enthusiastically provided numerous programs for toddlers, preschoolers, and school- 
age children. Puppet shows, musical performances, a summer reading program, 
evening PJ story times, and programs for parents made for an event- filled year. 

The Friends of the Library continued to be a major support for the library and its 
programs. Friends of the Library President Kathy Simon with an enthusiastic Board 
and membership sustained and extended their financial and moral support. The 
Friends once again underwrote the children's story times and special programs. They 
also funded the purchase of new books, audiovisual materials, and equipment for the 
library. The Friends continued their popular program of providing museum passes for 
the public. 

The Library Endowment Fund Board of Trustees, under the chairmanship of Diane 
Jurmain, continued it's strong backing of the library. The Library Endowment Fund 
made donations to purchase more materials for the children's book, young adult book, 
adult large print, DVD and Books on CD collections. There were numerous donations 
by individuals and groups to the library during the course of the year. The Library 
applied for and received a grant from the Medfield Women's Association for $1,000 to 
build the literature and classic fiction in the adult collections. 

Volunteers were another important component in making a successful year for the 
library. The many individuals who volunteered to work in the library were greatly 
appreciated by both staff and public. Volunteers served in both the circulation and 
children's departments. Numerous individuals assisted in shelving returned materials 
for the circulation department. 

ANNUAL STATISTICS 

New Library Materials Added 7,715 Total Materials Owned 66,170 

Circulation of Materials 215,332 Number of Registered Borrowers 8,962 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dan Brassell 
Library Director 



64 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield, 

The Library in 2002-2003 continued its growth and development. For the first time 
in Library history circulation exceeded 200,000 items. The total circulation of 
215,332 items was an increase of 14% over 2001-02, and an increase of 36% since the 
Library's renovation in 1996. 

The Library's holding's increased to 66,170 items, with over 7,000 non-print items 
such as CD's, DVD's, books-on-tape, and VHS video tapes. This is a 5.7% increase 
over the previous year, and a 59.6% increase since 1996. 

The Library's efficiency continues to increase. Medfield's ranking among the 54 
Massachusetts towns with a population of 10,000 - 15,000 is: 

Circulation 7th 

Circulation per Full-Time Equivalent Employee 2nd 

Circulation per Hours Open 4th 

Circulation per Capita 6th 

This data shows how hard-working and efficient Library Director Dan Brassell and the 
entire staff are at handling the growth in Library patronage and circulation. On behalf 
of the Library Board of Trustees and the Town, I applaud them. 

The depth and quality of the Library's collection, especially in newer media and titles, 
has attracted patrons from around the Boston area. Direct circulation (patrons coming 
to the Library as opposed to Inter-Library Loans) to non-residents has nearly doubled 
in the last two years and is now 20,546, nearly 10% of the Library's circulation . This 
is several thousand people coming to downtown Medfield to use the Library, and 
hopefully other businesses as well, making the Library a major contributor to 
downtown development and growth. 

Challenges in the upcoming year and beyond include migrating to the Minuteman 
Library Network's new technology platform and continuing growth in patronage and 
circulation. The Library also continues to seek operating efficiencies and additional 
revenue sources to meet the demands of the state and Town budget constraints. 

Respectfully Submitted 

Robert J. Luttman 

Chair, Library Board of Trustees 

Patricia Fitzgerald 

Jo-Anne Hooper 

Maura McNicholas 

James Whalen 

Geoffrey Tritsch 

65 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its fourteenth Annual Report. 
During the year we have nurtured the new plantings and new seeding of the grass at 
Baxter Memorial Veterans' Park. The Park is certainly a creation of beauty and an 
everlasting memorial to our Veterans of all wars. A great place in the center of 
Medfield for one to come and sit in solitude, read the memorial bricks in the walkways 
or to reflect and read the names on the monuments. Once again this year bricks were 
offered for sale for the walkways and will be placed the first week in May. Bricks will 
be for sale each year from Sept. 1 through Feb. 15. A total of 150 new bricks were 
placed this May. 

We wish to thank all residents who have made this park possible and to the many 
departments of the Town of Medfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

G. Marshall, Chairman 

Richard DeSorgher 

Frank Iafolla 

Jane M. Lomax 

David F. Temple 

Robert. A. Kinsman, Associate Member 



66 



VETERANS' SERVICE OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfleld 

I hereby submit my third report as Veterans' Service Officer for the Town of 
Medfield. 

Veterans Services include helping the Veteran with benefits when hospitalization, 
pension assistance, information on education, social security burial allowances. This 
assistance includes fuel, food, clothing, housing and expenses for Veterans and their 
families. Every Veteran should enroll in VA medical services in case of an 
emergency; forms are available at the Town Hall or by calling 508-359-8505 ext 632. 
Also available are applications for Veteran Plates and the Korean War Service Medal 
for service in Korea between June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953. 

Services and assistance rendered Medfield Veterans and their dependents are 
authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Commonwealth reimburses 
the Town seventy- five percent of the benefits extended. 

I wish to thank Town officials and especially Carol Mayer and Patricia Walsh for their 
assistance and helpfulness this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Marshall Chick 
Veterans' Service Officer 



67 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 2002 

(Given by Robert F. Sylvia) 



I am pleased to see a large crowd gathered here today. Unfortunately, perhaps as a 
result of the Monday holiday legislation, important national holidays such as 
Memorial Day seem to have been diminished in importance in the minds of people. 
This day, which is designed to remember the veterans who have made the supreme 
sacrifice in order to guarantee our freedom, deserves to be more than just an 
opportunity to take an extra day away from work. You are, therefore, to be 
congratulated for being willing to publicly demonstrate your respect and gratitude to 
those who have given their lives for this country. 

As many of you know, Memorial Day, and many other national holidays, used to be 
extremely important occasions. Before the arrival of radio, television and the sound 
bite, they were usually characterized by oratory that extended for hours at a time 
leaving the audience standing or sitting in the hot sun. In fact, few people remember 
that Abraham Lincoln was not the principal speaker at Gettysburg. The designated 
orator for the dedication of the national cemetery at Gettysburg in 1863 was one 
Edward Everett, who spoke for approximately two hours on a subject or subjects that 
no one but academic historians now recall. In contrast, Mr. Lincoln, who was asked 
to speak only out of respect for the office he held, delivered, in the space of a few 
minutes, the most famous speech in all of American history, that being the Gettysburg 
Address, which was recited so brilliantly earlier today by Kristin Lagman. 

Now before anyone starts to get nervous, let me assure you that I do not intend to 
follow Mr. Everett's example. Rather, I will try to follow that of Mr. Lincoln. While 
I certainly can't hope to equal President Lincoln in eloquence, I can and will follow 
his example of brevity. 

Memorial Day is a day for looking back on the things that have transpired during the 
nation's history so that we may honor those who gave their lives to guarantee the 
freedom we now have. As we begin to look back today, one cannot help but pause 
and consider the events of September 11, 2001. The attacks that were carried out on 
this country on that day were a great tragedy for the nation as a whole, and for the 
individuals who died in the attacks and their families, but even events which are great 
tragedies inspired by evil can teach us things which will be of value. In this case I 
think there are three positive developments arising from this tragedy which are worth 
remembering. 

First, despite the obscene rejoicing at the success of the September 1 1 th attacks by the 
Palestinians, which was highlighted on television newscasts on September 11* and 
immediately thereafter, I believe that we are liked and respected in most parts of the 
world, even though, in the aftermath of the tragedy, that may not have been 
immediately apparent. My wife and I were traveling in Central Europe with friends 
on September 11, 2001. When we received the shocking news of the attacks, our 



68 



initial reaction was to wonder about our personal safety and how we would ever get 
back to the United States, given the chaos that the transportation systems, particularly 
the airlines, were experiencing. As it turned out, however, we had no choice but to 
continue our vacation, because with the airlines not flying, there simply was no other 
choice. As events transpired, I am glad that we did. Throughout the next two weeks 
as we traveled from Warsaw to Cracow to Prague and to Budapest, numerous people 
came up to us on the streets or in restaurants, as soon as they recognized our 
American accented English, to express their condemnation of the attacks, their 
sympathy for us and the American people as a whole and their support of the efforts 
they assumed America would ultimately make to bring the perpetrators of this great 
crime, and those who assisted them, to justice. Many of these people spoke little if 
any English, but, in one way or another, they managed to convey to us their solidarity 
with the American people in this time of great difficulty. I will remember to my 
dying day our visit to the United States Embassy in Prague shortly after the attack. 
The street in front of the Embassy was covered with floral tributes and supportive 
signs and posters extending sympathy and support to the United States in the wake of 
this great tragedy. 

The lesson to be drawn from all of this is that we do not stand alone in this world in 
our efforts to eradicate terrorism and bring the perpetrators of the September 11 th 
attack, and those who aided them, to justice. It was and remains a comforting feeling 
in a very difficult time. 

Second, it is apparent to me that the American tradition of heroism is alive and well. 
One need only look at the conduct of the men and women of the New York City 
Police and Fire Departments in the aftermath of the attack to be certain of that 
conclusion. These brave men and women risked, and in some instances gave, their 
lives in efforts to rescue people that they would never know. Their selfless heroic 
conduct at a time of great national need serves as a shining example for all of us of 
what citizens must do in troubled times. If one needs an additional example of this 
principle, one need only consider the passengers and crew of the flight that crashed in 
Pennsylvania taking the lives of all aboard. Had they not chosen to resist the 
hijackers, it is likely that this plane would have crashed into the White House, the 
Capitol or some other public building in Washington. Their actions, which resulted in 
the sacrifice of their lives, saved the lives of untold numbers of their fellow citizens. 

Third, I know it is fashionable to criticize the current generation for their softness and 
lack of patriotism, but I can tell you that whatever doubt people may have had about 
the willingness of this generation to do the job of defending this country and its 
national interests, as Americans have done since 1776, was put to rest by the 
performance of the members of our armed forces in Afghanistan. The 
professionalism and courage shown by these men and women in extremely difficult 
conditions is deserving of our admiration and support. If it was not clear before, it is 
certainly clear now, that the members of this generation who are called to the colors 
will courageously, honorably and successfully defend our freedom now and in the 
future. 



69 



While these are positive developments which have arisen from this national tragedy in 
which we can take some comfort, there is one more legacy of September 1 1 th which is 
not comforting, that being the fact that the nation is once again at war. Further, it is a 
different kind of war than we have fought before. We face a cowardly enemy that 
hides in holes and purposely targets innocent civilians as part of its primary strategy. 
This war has already resulted in attacks on our homeland and destruction, the likes of 
which we have not seen since the Civil War. 

The war on terrorism, difficult as it may be, is a war that we can, must and will win, 
but it is a war that presents us with difficult choices. While we must prosecute it 
diligently to a successful conclusion no matter what the cost, we cannot in the process 
abandon our basic values. As Vice-President Cheney said on a recent visit to 
Massachusetts, we must be careful in our zeal to win this war not to abandon our 
basic principles and values. Our liberty and our free society are the things that our 
enemy hates the most about us, and we cannot abandon those values, because, by so 
doing we would give the enemy a victory it can never win on the battlefield. 

There is no question that the prosecution of this war, while maintaining our basic 
principles and values, will be a difficult tightrope to walk, but it is necessary to do so. 
One might then ask what can individual citizens do to support this effort. 

A good start would be to accept the advice President Kennedy gave this nation more 
than forty years ago, at another time of great national crisis, in his inaugural address. 
The President said, "Ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can 
do for your country." The road ahead will not be easy. We will face sacrifices as a 
nation and as individuals which will require strength, courage and perseverance. 
Some of our citizens will be called to the colors and will be asked, as many have been 
asked before them, to place their lives on the line, and in some cases to lose them, in 
defense of our freedom. Others will be asked to wait at home and support their sons, 
daughters, nieces and nephews as they carry this war to a successful conclusion with 
all of the pain, anxiety and heartache that will entail. While many of us will not be 
asked to do that much, we will all be required to accept major and minor 
inconveniences as we wait in lines for everything from airplanes, trains and at sports 
stadiums and theaters. 

The acceptance of these major and minor sacrifices, and our willingness to diligently 
make them, are, however, the best honor we can give to our fallen heroes. That after 
all is what Memorial Day is all about. 

And so as we pause to honor those who have made the supreme sacrifice in defense of 
our freedom, let us resolve to do our part so that in Lincoln's immortal words, 
"Government of the people, by the people and for the people shall not perish from the 
earth." 

Thank you very much. 



70 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In the calendar year of 2002, the Board of Health focused on a myriad of issues 
affecting the public health and safety of the residents of Medfield, ranging from safety 
concerns related to the school construction projects to planning for community 
response in case of a disaster. The Board of Health welcomed a new member, Marcia 
Aigler, and a new associate member, Keith Diggans to the board. We are a five- 
member board with two associate members. Several Board of Health members 
attended a course in December 2002 and received certification by the Massachusetts 
Association of Health Boards. 

Catherine Steever, ME, BS, resigned from the Board of Health after two years of 
service. We thank Ms. Steever for her dedicated service to our town. 

Sheryl Sacchetine resigned as Administrative Assistant to the Board of Health after six 
years. We thank Ms. Sacchetine for her patience with and assistance to the many 
members of the Board of Health during a time of much transition, and for her 
helpfulness to the residents of Medfield on a daily basis. 

The adoption of Medfield's newly revised tobacco regulation on June 12, 2002 was an 
important step in promoting public health which could not have been accomplished 
without the dedication and expertise of Janet Lilienthal, Medfield's Tobacco Control 
Agent. Unfortunately, due to the cuts in the state funding of Tobacco Control 
Programs throughout Massachusetts, Ms. Lilienthal's position was eliminated as of 
November 30, 2002. We thank Ms. Lilienthal for her sincere dedication to the success 
of the Tobacco Control Program, and ultimately to the promotion of optimal health 
among Medfield residents. 

The Board of Health served as a dispatch site for dead birds as part of the Norfolk 
County Mosquito Control Project. The birds were transported to the Department of 
Public Health laboratory for West Nile Virus testing. The office continued its 
program of vaccinating new students and public service personnel, as well as its flu 
vaccination programs and blood pressure/wellness clinics for Medfield residents. 

Environmental 

William R. Domey, P.E., provided Environmental and Civil Engineering services to 
the Board of Health. These services include: Oversight of septic systems including soil 
evaluations, determination of high groundwater, review of engineering plans for 
compliance with Title 5 and the Board of Health regulations, inspection of 
construction, evaluation of variance requests, and issuance of certificates of 
compliance; Review of Site Plans and preliminary and definitive Subdivision Plans for 



71 



compliance with the Board of Health stormwater regulations and suitability for on-site 
sewage disposal where applicable; Review of On-site Well water proposals, water 
quality and quantity results, and treatment units; Review of Title 5 inspection reports 
that are performed, most often at time of sale, to assure that the inspector has followed 
the state mandated procedures for the evaluation; Review of Building Permit 
applications for additions and renovations to assure that the proposed work does not 
conflict with the location or capacity of the septic system serving the property; 
Investigation of complaints regarding sewage overflows, odors, illegal dumping, 
hazardous waste, and preparation of enforcement orders where applicable, and 
working with offending parties to attain compliance; Issuance of Disposal System 
Installer and Septage Hauler Permits; Provision of general consultation to the Board of 
Health; Assistance to the Board of Health in the preparation of regulations and 
guidelines; and attendance at Board of Health meetings. 

In the year 2002, as in previous years, the major focus of the Environmental 
Engineer/ Agent has been septic systems and stormwater management. As a result of a 
high degree of control over septic systems, the rate of failure of septic systems 
constructed since 1975 remains very low. For those who must upgrade, it should be 
noted that, to assist homeowners to minimize financial burden, the Board of Health 
issues local and state variances as needed to achieve Maximum Feasible Compliance. 
These variances have to be justified by documentation of difficult or limited site 
conditions or excessive construction costs. Guidelines are available at the Board of 
Health office. Reviews of proposed Site Plans and Subdivisions were conducted for 
the high school addition, the elementary school addition, Shining Valley Farm, Shaw's 
Plaza expansion, Robinson Road subdivision, Brookside subdivision, the Crowell 
Veterinary Clinic, and the resubmittal of Erik Road Extension, to assure compliance 
with Board of Health regulations. In addition, there was participation in the 
enforcement for and the inspection of the completion of the construction of the 
stormwater system at the Lilac Lane subdivision. It should be noted that the long 
standing existing stormwater regulations of the Board of Health provide Town of 
Medfield compliance with much of the EPA Phase II program. 

The following permits were issued during 2002: 



On-site soil tests 


6 


Septic system plan reviews 


3 


(New systems and Upgrades) 




Septic repair permits 


10 


Septic Installer permits 


26 


Subdivision/Project reviews 


8 


Well permits 


5 


Septage Hauler/Carter vehicles 


26 


Private Swimming Pools 


3 


Addition/renovation reviews 


39 



72 



Sanitation 

Mark Oram, RS, CHO of Enviro-Tech Consultants conducted consulting services for 
enforcement of regulations related to food establishments, massage therapy, 
swimming facilities, recreational camps for children, and general sanitation issues. 

The services and consultation to the Board of Health included attending Board of 
Health meetings, inspections of food establishments and school cafeterias, 
consultation and field services with the Tobacco Control Agent, consultation with the 
Environmental Agent and State agencies. Also inspections and reviews were 
conducted on a semi-public pool and the Hinkley Swim Pond recreational facility, 
which included review of biological reports and support services to the Park & 
Recreation Department and the staff. 

New food establishments were provided with consultation for the opening of their new 
businesses. Also, non-profit facilities were provided with additional updates that 
provide information on food safety. Enviro-Tech Consultants also continued support 
services to the administrative staff on the state and local requirements. 

2002 Permits Issued: 

60 Food Services Permits 

Includes: 32 Restaurants, counter bars, churches, cafeteria food service and 
vending machines 

1 3 Food stores / markets 

7 Bakeries 

8 Temporary food service permits 

1 Catering Services 

1 Ice Cream Truck 

1 Frozen Dessert 

1 Tanning Facility 

13 Massage Therapy (individual & establishment) 
1 Semi Public Pool 
1 Bathing Beach 
3 Camps 

Inspections and Investigations 

92 Food Establishment Inspections 15 Housing / Lead Paint Inspections 
12 Beach / Pool Inspections 



Medfleld Youth Outreach 

Purpose - Medfield Youth Outreach is a program located under the auspices of the 

Medfield Board of Health. The purpose of the office is to serve youth age infant to age 



73 



eighteen and their families. The town's Youth Outreach Worker provides short term 
individual and family counseling, information and referral, crisis intervention, 
community programming, and assistance with access to financial assistance programs 
to Medfield residents. The Medfield Youth Outreach office is an intake site for the 
Federal Fuel Assistance Program for Medfield residents. All of Medfield Youth 
Outreach services are free and confidential . 

The Medfield Youth Outreach Office is located on the 2 nd floor of the Town Hall. 
Appointments are made by calling Dawn Alcott, LICSW at 359-7121. Hours are full 
time and flexible to meet programmatic need. 

Counseling Services - In the past year 406 counseling hours were provided to 
Medfield youth and families. Major issues dealt with through out the calendar year 
included: 



Academic Difficulties 

Anger Management 

Anxiety 

Bereavement 

Body Image/Eating Disorder 

Child Abuse/Neglect 

Dating Violence 

Depression 



Divorce 

Domestic Violence 
Family Discord 
Financial Difficulties 
Major Mental Illness 
Oppositional Behavior 
Parenting Skills 
Run Away 



Self Esteem 
Self Mutilation 
Sexual Assault 
Sexuality 
Social Skills 
Substance Abuse 
Violence 



Information and Referral Contacts - The Youth Outreach Worker receives an 
average of 70 telephone calls per month seeking information and referral. Referrals 
for clinical services, need based programs, support groups, wrap around services, 
advocacy, and state and federal programs are routinely provided. 

Programs - Medfield Youth Outreach also facilitates various groups, programs, and 
services with in the community that are related to the needs of youth and their 
families. The programs offered are often prevention and psycho-educationally based. 
The programs in 2002 included Create TV- a media literacy/exploration group for 
middle school girls, parent trainings and workshops, professional networking 
opportunities, the Peer Leadership Program at the high school and teen workshop 
opportunities. This past year approximately 237 individuals participated in programs 
facilitated by Youth Outreach. 

Community Organizing - Medfield Youth Outreach collaborates with a wide network 
of organizations to better meet the needs of Medfield youth and their families 
including state and federal agencies, law enforcement, the public schools, networks, 
consortiums, professional associations, religious institutions, parent gatherings and 
civic groups. 



74 



Volunteers - Medfield Youth Outreach welcomes volunteers to assist with the 
implementation of various programs. In the year 2002 Medfield Youth Outreach 
enjoyed the assistance two young women from the high school. Kathleen Schwartz 
and Ali Krasnow gave of their time, energy and talents to facilitate the Create TV girls 
group. Community member Lisa Donovan also gave unselfishly of her time to the 
Peer Leadership Program. At Medfield Day, Marcia Aigler (Board of Health liaison 
to Medfield Youth Outreach) organized a fundraiser to benefit Medfield Youth 
Outreach and supported the fundraising efforts of the Peer Leadership group. 

Goals for the future- Increasing the capacity of Medfield Youth Outreach to serve in 
the prevention and treatment of mental health and substance abuse disorders is the 
primary goal for 2003. This goal will be achieved through the hiring of a second full- 
time Youth Outreach Worker. 

This position has been financed in part through the approved Board of Health budget 
for fiscal year 2003, beginning in January 2003, with enough funds to sustain it 
through June 30, 2003. Matching funds have been obtained through a grant proposal 
to the Metrowest Community Health Care Foundation to cover the salary, benefits, 
and operational costs of the second position from July 1, 2003 through December 31, 
2003. Medfield Youth Outreach is grateful to the Town of Medfield and the 
Metrowest Community Health Care Foundation for their generous support. 

Other goals of the department will be to include the community in active means to 
support and guide the programs provided by Medfield Youth Outreach and for the 
department to continue to seek innovative methods to meet the needs of the parents 
and children in Medfield. 

Public Health 

Jean Sniffin, RN, BA of the Natick Visiting Nurses Association continues to provide 
programs in health promotion to all age groups, supplementing traditional home health 
services. The major components of the Health Promotion Program are: 

Health Maintenance for the Elderly 

Jean provides home visits as need to elderly residents who are homebound and have 
multiple chronic illnesses or conditions. The goal of the program is to assess changes 
in physical condition, prevent complications and unnecessary hospitalizations. 
Ambulatory residents are seen for physical assessment, health counseling including 
hypertension screening at the senior citizens clinics held at the Pfaff Center on the first 
Tuesday of every month and, at Tilden Village on the third Tuesday of every month. 

Communicable Disease 

Prevention and control of communicable disease through caseload, referrals, 
education and provision of follow up care consistent with public health practice. 
Lyme disease and other tick borne diseases continue to receive a lot of attention in 
2002, as well as follow-up on gastrointestinal illnesses. 



75 



Public Health 

There was opportunity this year to work with child care centers based in Medfield. 
Jean provided site visits and made educational materials available to both teachers and 
parents. Flu vaccine clinics were held continuously during November and December 
2002. Over three hundred doses were distributed to the general public during these 
clinics. The Board of Health especially wants to thank local residents, Jean Brown, 
RN, and Joan Iafolla, RN. For the second year, Jean and Joan volunteered their 
assistance with inoculations, client assistance and paperwork during these clinics. 

The Medfield Board of Health, serving as a depot for the Department of Public Health, 
supplies area providers with immunizations and vaccines. Although availability was 
decreased, over 600 doses of the influenza vaccine were supplied to area providers. 
Medfield' s Wastewater Treatment Plant Operators are vaccinated against Hepatitis A. 
All Medfield firefighters, police and EMT's are provided with the Hepatitis B vaccine. 
These vaccines are provided free through the Department of Public Health. 

Public Health Nursing statistics for 2002 are as follows: 

Office Visits (Town Hall) 336 

Blood Pressure Clinics / Visits 365 

Communicable Disease Follow-up 49 

Home Visits & Community Health 83 



Tobacco Control Program 

The Medfield Board of Health, in conjunction with the Boards of Health of Dover, 
Needham, and Westwood, was awarded a three-year contract from the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health for the Tobacco Control Program. The Program's 
activities are supported by the Health Protection Fund established upon passage of 
voter referendum Question 1 (Tobacco Excise Tax) in November, 1992. 

Key elements of the Tobacco Control Program include: 

• Policy promotion and enforcement of regulations governing sales of 
tobacco to minors (youth access) and environmental tobacco smoke in 
public places and workplaces 

• Referral to tobacco treatment services 

• Community education and tobacco use prevention 

In 2002, 12 tobacco vendors were inspected for compliance with Town Regulations 
and State Law and were issued permits to sell tobacco. To monitor the sale of tobacco 
to minors, The Tobacco Control Program conducted compliance checks of tobacco 
retailers in Medfield. 



76 



The Tobacco Control Program is a member of the Medfield Public School's Health 
Advisory Committee and consults with school personnel to promote smoke free school 
policies and plan substance abuse prevention events and programming. 

For information regarding Tobacco Control Program services and activities or to file a 
complaint regarding secondhand smoke or the sale of tobacco to minors, please 
contact the Board of Health at (508) 359-8505 x604. 

South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens 

With funding through the Medfield Board of Health, the South Norfolk County 
Association for Retarded Citizens ("SNARC") provides and supports services to 
citizens of Medfield who are mentally retarded. The Association is a non-profit, 
membership-based organization of more than 500 members, governed by family 
members of those we service, including community residents on the Board of 
Directors. 

Created in 1954 and governed today by several hundred local families with children 
disabled by mental retardation, South Norfolk County Association for retarded 
Citizens, Inc. (SNCARC) is a self-help grass roots organization motivated by local 
needs. We are the voice and heart of advocacy for mental retardation for our 12 local 
towns. As a home-grown, non-profit organization, we have always been accountable 
to, and dependent on, local financial and volunteer supports. Our job has been to use 
this platform of local support to advocate for and draw into our communities other 
public and private resources needed to serve the needs of our neighbors who are 
disabled by mental retardation. 

South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens applies these local supports 
to provide services which include: family support programs encompassing case 
management, emergency and clinical services, our Family Autism Center, consultation 
and training and in-home respite care services. Also included are the educational and 
rehabilitative day programs, which continue the work of the school department, and 
the adult and after-school social and recreational programs which provide several 
social clubs and special events, evening educational classes, discussion groups and a 
variety of sports activities. We also operate through our related party organization, 
Lifeworks, a range of residential and vocational training programs. 

The support from our local communities has provided the funding base from which we 
have always operated. This local support, control and accountability well serves local 
needs in a highly cost efficient manner. By pooling the requests with the funding given 
by the other 1 1 towns to your local Association for Retarded Citizens, Medfield is able 
to achieve a cost efficiency which allows them to do more for its mentally retarded 
citizens than it could individually. We believe it a testament to this good financial 
sense as well as the good works performed by SNCARC, that each of the 12 towns we 
serve continue to provide this funding support as they have done for so many years. 



77 



The following services have been provided this past year to Medfield individuals and 
families: 



PROGRAM 




# SERVED 


Family Support/Respite 


Care 


21 


Family Autism 




14 


Harbor Counseling 




2 


Social/Recreation 




5 


Advocacy 




38 


Residential 




2 


Vocational Training/Transport 


3 



The total expenses for all of the SNCARC Program/ Advocacy services provided to 
Medfield residents in 2002 was $220,166.00. On behalf of these individuals and their 
families, thank you for your support of this partnership. 

Medfield residents desiring these services for a family member with a developmental 
disability should contact the South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens 
at (508) 359-5546, or (781) 762-4001. The Association welcomes visits from 
interested persons to its community-based programs. 

The Board of Health normally holds its meetings on the second Wednesday evening of 
each month at 6:30 PM. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are invited 
to attend. Anyone interested in becoming a Board of Health member may either call 
the Board of Health office, staffed by Nancy Bennotti, the Administrative Assistant, or 
attend one of the regular meetings for information. The Board of Health office is open 
part-time with new office hours as follows: 

Monday through Thursday 8:30 AM-12:30 PM 
Friday 8:30 AM-1 :00 PM 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lucy Schlesinger, Chair 
Vincent Lavallee 
Kathleen Schapira 
Frances Sullivan 
Marcia Aigler 
Betsy Dorisca, Associate 
Keith Diggans, Associate 



78 



MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 2002. 

The Authority is committed to working cooperatively with community, state, federal 
and local officials to provide safe, decent and affordable housing. 

For information and/or application for housing at Tilden village, please contact Donna 
M. Dolan, Executive Director at 508 359-6454. 

A five member Board of Commissioners establishes policy; four of who are elected by 
the Town and one appointed by the Governor of Massachusetts. 

Monthly Board Meetings are held on the second Wednesday of every month at 7:00 
p.m. in the office of the Executive Director, unless otherwise posted at Town Hall. 
The meetings are open to the public. 

At the March 2002 town election Lisa Donovan was elected to serve on the Board 
until the March 2007 town election. 

In May our Resident Commissioner, Mary Rogers, passed away. Mary was a 
conscientious and dedicated member of our community and will be sorely missed. 
The residents of Tilden village purchased a birdbath for the courtyard and dedicated it 
in Mary's name. 

The Selectmen and the Medfield Housing Authority Board voted to appoint L. Paul 
Galante to fill the unexpired term of the late Mary Rogers until the March 2003 
election. 

In November we advertised for site improvements including sidewalk and paving 
design. We hope to start work on our roadway, sidewalks, and parking lot in the 
spring of 2003. 

Richard DeSorgher had members of his U.S. History class meet with some of our 
residents to talk about their recollections of World War II and the Depression. 

The Beacon Project from the Dale Street School continues to be a favorite with our 
residents. Throughout the year they have hosted socials, brunches, a thanksgiving 
dinner, and a cookout. We would especially like to acknowledge and thank Sue 
Reardon and Caren McElhenny for their dedication to this project and to Tilden 
Village. 



79 



The Blake Middle School eighth graders and staff hosted a delicious holiday dinner 
for all our residents. This event is always well attended and enjoyed by all. A special 
thank you to Kathy Craig who coordinated everything and made this dinner happen 
once again. 

This year we were fortunate to have two Girl Scouts working on badges contribute 
their time and effort toward brightening up our Community Room and the courtyard. 
Megan McCarthy and Lauren Seghezzi put up a wallpaper border in the laundry room 
and made valances and throw pillows for the main room. They also planted flowers at 
the entrance and exit of Tilden Village. 

Special thanks and kudos to the Brownie and Girl Scout troops and the youth groups 
from the various churches that brought events and programs to Tilden Village 
throughout the year. 

A blood pressure clinic is held on the third Tuesday of every month in the Community 
Room. 

TRIAD meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of each month in the Community 
Room. 

The Medfield Housing Authority wishes to express its gratitude and thanks to the 
School Department, Fire Department, and the Police Department for their support and 
assistance during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Jordan, Chairman 
James T. Regan, Treasurer 
Lisa Donovan, Commissioner 
L. Paul Galante, Commissioner 
Valerie Mariani, State Appointee 
Donna M. Dolan, Executive Director 



80 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging has undergone many changes during the fiscal year 
2002. The involvement and participation has increased by over 33% for programs and 
some events pulling in a 50% increase in participation. These changes are reflective 
of a dedicated board, new programming and energetic staff. We are very fortunate to 
have Pat Maloney as our Volunteer Coordinator, Marion Masterson as our Outreach 
Worker, Juan Anacleto as our Transportation Coordinator and Steve Guy as a part- 
time driver. We continue to pursue and achieve our ongoing goal of creating an 
atmosphere of "Senior Wellness" for the older population in Medfield through event 
programming, outreach services, and meeting transportation needs. 

The Council on Aging Board is presently made up of four community members. Their 
involvement and contributions to the Council on Aging are greatly appreciated. 
Members include Lou Fellini-Chairman, Ruth Nadler, Kathleen Kristof and Peg 
Jenkins as Treasurer. Council member Bob Ness offered his resignation from the 
board effective January 1, 2003. Bob will be missed and his efforts in organizing 
events and the efforts put forth on acquiring a new bus are greatly appreciated. The 
entire board has and continues to work diligently to move the Council on Aging in a 
positive direction, into a facility of its own. Through their efforts and the support and 
generosity of the community at Town Meeting, a parcel of land on Marvin Road was 
transferred to the Council on Aging and the monies necessary to begin architectural 
plans for a new Adult/Senior Center were approved. 

Meeting the transportation needs of seniors has been a major concern for the Council. 
The present van has driven over 12,000 miles this past year, offering folks numerous 
excursions to places outside of Medfield. Examples of our mini-trips include 
Newport, RI, Plymouth, Concord, Boston, Shirley, and Nantasket Beach to name a 
few. Instituting "mini-trips" for the Council on Aging was a way for people to visit 
and experience new (and old) areas of interest for a minimal cost. Almost 170 
passengers people enjoyed our varied mini-trip offerings. To assist in meeting our 
transportation needs, our efforts to purchase a second vehicle are now winding down 
with only $6000.00 needed. The Council on Aging hosted a craft fair this past 
December, which was a huge success, generating over $1200.00 towards the "Bus 
Fund". The Bus Fund took on a life of its own, with significant fundraising by the 
schools and community wide, as individuals contributed to the cause. A special thank 
you goes to Donna Dragotakes who organized the "Quiz-it" Game show, which was 
entertaining and benefited the Bus Fund enormously. All of these efforts have 
contributed to our goal and we are almost there!! The Council on Aging believes that 
if transportation is accessible and available, allowing a person to maintain their 



81 



independence, than the overall quality of life is much better, for the senior and their 
family. Transportation is an important component to the services the Council on 
Aging provides and we are fortunate to have dedicated drivers to meet these needs. 

The "Senior Spotlight" continues to be published monthly, right out of the Director's 
office. The Spotlight is mailed directly to 210 people who subscribe and the yearly 
cost is $4.00 or folks can pick up the newsletter at various locations around town. 
Anyone interested in advertising their business in the Spotlight can do so by calling 
the COA office. 

The Seniors Room in the Pfaff Center has a new look this year, thanks to Marion 
Masterson. Marion gave the entrance to the Seniors Room a face lift with a little bit of 
paint and some wallpaper. WOW, what a difference! The Library in the Seniors 
Room is up and running and meticulously maintained by volunteer Ann Cianciarelli. 
The books are current, they are labeled and are available for you to borrow. The size 
of the computer lab is holding at 7 computers all with Windows Millennium and 
Office XP, and three of these computers are able to access the Internet. Computer 
classes have continued throughout the year with Instructor Tom Nolan. Tom is 
instrumental in helping seniors to utilize computers for their personal use, along with 
maintaining the computers for the council. During the summer, Maggie Joseph 
volunteered her time and offered two 5 -class internet courses, which were greatly 
appreciated and attended. 

The Council on Aging continues to offer new and exciting programs, for example, an 
added poetry group, golfing, relaxation classes, ping pong, and monthly speakers on a 
variety of subjects, from politics, finances and health issues, along with knitting 
classes, craft classes, an expanding woodcarving class featuring all levels of carving. 
Anyone interested in programs or events should call the COA office. Attendance has 
increased considerably and the schedule is full, leaving little room to add any future 
programs to run in the Seniors Room. 

The Medfield Council on Aging has made significant changes and continues to do so. 
Energies are directed towards building an Adult/Senior Center that will address the 
needs of the aging population in the community. More and more parents of Medfield 
families are moving into the community and thus services from the Council on Aging 
are being tapped. This past year has been an active one with a significant increase in 
the number of calls regarding seniors in crisis. Our Outreach Worker, Marion 
Masterson handles the calls extraordinarily well on a limited 15 hours per week. The 
idea of planning and developing an Adult Day /Respite Program has surfaced and 
hopefully the COA will be able to offer a service one day per week by the start of the 
new fiscal year. The transportation program under Juan Anacleto, has made 
significant strides in increasing the number of people being transported on a daily dial- 
a-ride service utilizing newly purchased cellular phones. The dedicated and talented 



82 



volunteers involved with the COA through the program coordinator, Pat Maloney, are 
greatly appreciated for all of their time and effort. Together the staff of the COA, 
provide services that assist people to live independently, enjoy a quality of life, pursue 
activities and connect them with services that allow them to remain in their homes for 
as long as possible. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Roberta Lynch, Director 
Louis Fellini, Chairman 
Margaret Jenkins, Treasurer 
Ruth Nadler 
Kathleen M. Kristof 



83 



PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Parks and Recreation Commission is a five member, elected board of 
volunteers. The Commission is charged with the responsibility of maintaining the 
Pfaff Community Center and of the public properties - Town Hall, Library, 
Historical Society, Dwight Derby House, Fire Department, Police Department, 
Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park and Swim Pond, Baxter Park, Baker's Pond and 
McCarthy Park. 

The Commission's responsibilities include: recruiting qualified personnel; creating 
policies; generating diversified recreational and educational opportunities; monitoring 
the maintenance schedule for the above properties; and advising the Director to 
achieve the goals set forth in the Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan. The 
department consists of a Director and Program Coordinator and a part-time 
maintenance person. Additional personnel are recruited to teach classes and organize 
summer programs. Responsibilities of the department include: creating, 
implementing, evaluating and adjusting year round leisure experiences; establishing 
fiscal and personnel plans to complete the objectives for each program; monitoring 
public property usage; and implementing a maintenance regime for many Town 
properties. 

The Parks and Recreation Commission is dedicated to providing quality programs that 
can enhance the quality of life for Medfield residents. Participation units in Parks and 
Recreation Programs are as follows: 





Participants 




Participants 


Youth programs 


2000 


Summer Discovery Program 


210 


Youth Sports 


800 


Jr. Tennis Program 


425 


Adult Activities/Fitness 


550 


Swim Pond Memberships 


275 


Special Events 


5000 


Swim Team 


67 


Day Trips 


930 


Swim Lessons 


510 



Capital improvements and maintenance continues to be a priority. The Commission 
supports a centralized scheduling and maintenance system for public properties. It is 
the Commissions intent to assist in simplifying the process for reserving field space 
and ensure that routine maintenance is being performed. Capital improvement goals 
include Pfaff center upgrades, improving the quality of the swim pond and re- 
conditioning of our Medfield's community park system. 



84 



We would also like to take this opportunity to thank the scores of residents who 
volunteer their time and energies in many of our recreation and sports programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jim Landry, Chairman 
Lisa Louttit 

Tom Caragliano, Secretary 
Scott McDermott 
Steve Farrar 



85 



TREE WARDEN AND INSECT CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 2002. 

The 300 trees that were planted for the Bicentennial are growing very well. We did 
however experience a 20% loss due to drought and vandalism. 

Several tree hearings were held this year. As a result of the South Street hearing, about 
60 trees were taken down due to the relocation of the street. 

This year we removed 30 tree stumps throughout town. This was possible due to the 
cooperation of several towns purchasing a co-owned stump remover. 

Yellow Ash disease is still present in Medfield. We continuously survey, recognize 
and remedy potential hazardous tree conditions before serious problems occur. 

The mild winter of 2002 resulted in little tree damage due to storms. 

McMillan Professional Tree Service is in their second year of a three year bid for 
pruning and removal of town trees. 

I would like to thank all the volunteers and various Town Departments for all their 
help throughout the year. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their 
property, prior notice must be sent to the Town Clerk, by registered mail no later than 
March 1 of that year. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

Tree Warden 

Director of Insect Pest Control 



86 



NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Norfolk County continues to provide and expand meaningful services to its twenty- 
eight municipalities. We owe our success to a combination of factors, especially the 
superb support of our legislators, municipal officials, members of the Norfolk County 
Advisory Board and our department heads and employees, for performing their jobs in 
an exemplary manner. 

We continue to effectively monitor our financial resources and spending. Our focus 
continues to be on providing regional services throughout the county. Fiscal year 2002 
benefits were as follows: 

• Provided county engineering services countywide 

• Funded grants to local food pantries 

• Funded grants to MMA Consulting Group for regional (fire) dispatch feasibility 
study within Norfolk County 

• Funded Town of Holbrook Summer Youth Program 

• Funded grants to D.O.V.E. and R.S.V.P. 

The Norfolk County Agricultural High School in Walpole and Wollaston Recreational 
Facility in North Quincy (home of Presidents Golf Course) continue to be outstanding 
examples of beautiful and well-maintained county facilities, providing remarkable 
services to our citizens. Within our 2002 Annual Report publication is provided more 
detailed information regarding these activities. 

As County Commissioners we convey our thanks to everyone who has contributed to 
our county being the remarkable entity that it is. We especially thank our citizens for 
allowing us the privilege of serving them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William P. O'Donnell, Chairman 

John M. Gillis 

Peter H. Collins 

NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



87 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency for 
the 101 cities and towns in the metropolitan Boston area. Created by an act of the 
Legislature in 1963, it serves as a forum for state and local officials, as well as a broad 
range of other public and private interest groups, to address issues of regional 
importance. Council membership consists of municipal government representatives, 
gubernatorial appointees, and city and state agencies. 

As one of fourteen members of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), 
MAPC shares oversight responsibility for the region's federally funded transportation 
program. MAPC is also the federally designated economic development district for the 
region, responsible for creating an annual economic development plan. 

The Council provides technical assistance and professional resources in land use, the 
environment, housing, transportation, water resources management, economic 
development, demographic and socioeconomic data, legislative policy, and inter-local 
partnerships that strengthen the efficient and effective operation of local governments. 
MAPC has a state-of-the-art Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Laboratory and a 
highly respected Metro Data Center. 

Funding comes from municipal, state, federal, and private grants and contracts and a 
per capita assessment on member communities. 

In a variety of ways, MAPC provides leadership and services that respond to regional 
challenges and demands. These include: 

• Staffing and supporting eight sub-regional councils whose members, appointed by 
chief elected officials and planning boards, work together to address issues of 
mutual concern; 

• Facilitating the MPO Working Group that is developing criteria to prioritize 
transportation projects funded through the Transportation Improvement Program 
(TIP). MAPC has met with communities in each sub-region to develop these 
criteria. 

• Crafting, with allied organizations, recommendations to established a statewide 
Community Roads Program, which would simplify the design process for 
particular types of roads to preserve community character. The program allows 
certain improvements to proceed without lengthy design waiver processes or 
adherence to AASHTO design criteria. 

• Publishing Decade of Change, a report that uses new 2000 Census data and other 
sources to highlight growth trends in the region during the 1990s, and a companion 
volume of Community Profiles for each city and town; 

• Providing build-out analyses to all 101 municipalities to enable them to understand 
impacts of potential growth and take steps to manage it; 



88 



• Reviewing and commenting on key state legislation and regulations that affect 
communities, such as amendments to Title 5, which regulates septic systems; 

• Joining with other regional agencies to facilitate "Vision 2020," a long-range 
planning process for Southeastern Massachusetts; 

• Participating in the establishment and management of the 1-495 Initiative, a public- 
private forum that is examining growth impacts along the 1-495 corridor; 

• Partnering with others in a US Department of Labor funded Welfare-to-Work 
project that focuses on transportation barriers faced by low-income communities; 

• Establishing Regional Services Consortiums that help municipal managers to 
improve regional communication, information exchange, resource sharing, and 
collaborative action, including the collective purchasing of supplies and services; 

• Facilitating the establishment of the Metropolitan Mayors' Coalition, comprising 
Boston and nine surrounding cities, to work on common issues, including health 
care costs, emergency preparedness, group purchasing; 

• Assisting communities in visioning and designing scopes for Executive Order 418 
Community Development Plans; 

• Informing communities about the new Pictometry Imagery Technology and acting 
as regional distributor for such imagery; and 

• Conducting a multi-year regional visioning exercise that includes broad-based 
participation from all sectors of the region (see below). 

The Regional Visioning Project: Developing a Regional Growth Strategy for 
Metro Boston 

In one of the most exciting developments in the last year, MAPC launched a new civic 
process to create an updated Regional Growth Strategy for metropolitan Boston. 
MAPC is working with city and town governments and various other stakeholders to 
create a vision and strategy that puts the region on a sustainable path in terms of land 
use, economic, environmental, and social issues. 

The initiative was launched at a Boston College Citizens Seminar in May 2002. More 
than 400 people from a wide range of local and regional groups attended, and many 
have remained involved through the Process Design Team. That team, with more than 
150 stakeholders from various fields of expertise, has been meeting developed a 
design for the regional vision and growth strategy. 

We will continue to look for leaders in our 101 city-and-town region who would like 
to get involved and/or lend their support for this regional effort. Please contact MAPC 
if you would like to become involved in this process. 

MAPC welcomes Marc Draisen as the new MAPC Executive Director 

In October, MAPC was pleased to welcome Marc Draisen as its new Executive 
Director. Marc has a diverse background, including service as a State Representative 
and most recently as Executive Director of the Massachusetts Association of 
Community Development Corporations. He is an expert in housing issues, economic 
development, legislative process, and regional collaboration. 



89 



The Three Rivers Interlocal Council 

The The Three Rivers Interlocal Council of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
consists of the communities of Milton, Canton, Westwood, Dedham, Needham, 
Dover, Sharon, Foxborough, Walpole, Norwood, Stoughton, and Medfield. 
Representatives from these communities gather with MAPC on a monthly basis to 
discuss issues of subregional importance. A major focus of the Three Rivers Interlocal 
Council in 2002 continued to be transportation. The transportation topics which were 
discussed during the year included the Regional Transportation Plan, the Unified 
Planning Work Program, the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the ongoing 
Route 128 add-a-lane project, and prioritization of transit projects over highway 
projects. A training session was also provided to the communities regarding the 
process of transportation planning and improvements (from "concept to concrete") 
that is followed in Massachusetts. 

In addition to transportation, TRIC also held informational meetings and discussions 
on Zoning Reform legislation, the MAPC Regional Consortia, the 10-year report on 
change in the MAPC region and Pictometry, new aerial photography, available to the 
communities through MAPC (and paid for by MassHighway). 



90 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The operational program of the Project integrates all proven technologies into an 
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system of mosquito control and vector 
management that is rational, environmentally sensitive and cost effective. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Water Management Projects 

An important element of our EPM approach is the management of shallow, standing, 
stagnant water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which if neglected can 
contribute to mosquito. Breeding. In addition to normal drainage system 
maintenance, Project personnel advised residents on removal of water holding 
artificial containers on their property for the purpose of eliminating potential West 
Nile Virus mosquito breeding habitat. 

Drainage ditches checked/cleaned 620 feet 

Culverts checked/cleaned 46 culverts 

Larval Control 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the next most effective 
control effort. The products used during these applications were Bti and methoprene. 

Spring aerial larvicide applications 570 acres 

Larval control using briquette & granular applications 2.85 acres 
Rain Basin treatments using briquettes 969 basins 

Adult Control 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary when they are 
numerous, annoying, and/or threatening to residents. The product used during these 
applications was Resmethrin. 

Adult control aerosol applications from trucks 2,568 acres 

Surveys, inspections and pre/post monitoring in support of our program include 
locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and fieldwork 
evaluations leading to better water management. Due to the increase in West Nile 



91 



Virus activity in Norfolk County this year the surveillance program has been expanded 
dramatically. Considerable manpower has been reallocated to these efforts, which is 
not reflected in this report. 

NCMCP received 56 calls from residents for information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 
John J. Smith, Director 



92 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 



In July 2002 the School Committee reorganized and re-elected the following officers: 
Karl Lord (Medfield), Chairman, Robert McLintock (Seekonk) Vice-Chairman, and 
Louis Hoegler (Walpole), Secretary. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the third 
Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. in the Committee Meeting Room at the 
school. Sub-committee meetings are scheduled as needed. 

Graduation 

On June 2, 2002, 174 students were graduated in an impressive afternoon ceremony. 
Karl Lord, then Chairman of the Tri-County School Committee, delivered the 
welcoming address to more than one thousand guests. 

Music was provided by the Millis High School Band. Jean Walker, Director of 
Guidance, presented scholarships and awards totaling $220,000 to deserving seniors. 

Pupil Personnel Services 

In September 2001, Tri-County welcomed approximately 854 students to the new 
school year. The district towns and number of students are Franklin 191, Medfield 11, 
Medway 42, Millis 38, Norfolk 32, North Attleboro 206, Plainville 83, Seekonk 83, 
Sherborn 2, Walpole 65, and Wrentham 50. Also 55 students were accepted from out- 
of-district areas. 

During the 2001-2002 school year the Pupil Personnel Department continued its 
programs to provide information to students, parents, sending schools and District 
communities. The Department provided counseling for students regarding career 
pathways and post-secondary education. The Peer Helpers assisted in introducing Tri- 
County to junior high school students in sending communities and assisted new 
students in adjusting to Tri-County. A growing and successful Peer Mediators 
program offered conflict resolution for students by students. Safe and Drug Free 
presentations were offered to students school wide. The Guidance Department 
presented programs on preparing for college with the assistance of personnel from 
Dean College. Tri-County hosted Career Days for over 2000 Grade 8 students from 
the Regional District. 

Tri-County' s Career Advisement Program (CAP) was offered to all students in Grades 
9-12 to assist students in preparing for their career pathways. This was the 5 th year 
the program was offered, having started in September 1997 with Grades 9 and 10. 



93 



Academics 

Tri-County's academic program continues to focus on the Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks and successful preparation for the related MCAS tests. Our endeavors in 
this regard reflect a multi-faceted approach, which includes professional development 
for faculty, raising of curriculum standards, development of various student support 
mechanisms, multiple diagnostic assessments, and analysis of school-based data. 

We continue to incorporate technology into the instructional environment and have 
expanded our computer labs to three for academic class instruction. Various computer 
programs and computerized devices are being implemented in the learning process 
throughout the academic program area. 

The most exciting academic achievement to occur this year is the continued 
implementation and refinement of the required Senior Project. An integrated 
academic and vocational experience for our seniors. All seniors were required to 
participate. Components included a ten-page research paper; development of a 
product or service, and a ten to twenty minute presentation before a panel of judges 
including a teacher, an administrator and an industry representative. True 
collaboration between the English teachers and the Vocational teachers resulted in a 
deeper learning experience for each student and provided an academic focus for 
seniors throughout their school year. 

Vocational/Technical Programs 

During the 2001-2002 school year efforts were continued to acquire third party 
program approvals for all of our career and technical education courses. Currently the 
following programs have achieved certification from trade or industry groups: 

Auto Body - Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) 
Auto Technology - Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) 
Computer Technology - A+; Cisco Certified Network Associates; Network + 
Cosmetology - Commonwealth of Mass. Board of Registration of Cosmetology 
Culinary Arts - American Culinary Foundation 
Early Childhood Careers - Mass. Office for Child Care Services 
Electrical - Mass. State Board of Electrical Examiners 
Facilities Management - American Welding Society 
Marketing - Microsoft Office User specialist 
Medical Careers - Mass. DPH Certified Nursing Assistant (CAN) 
Plumbing & Hydronic Heating - Mass. State Board of Examiners of 

Plumbing & Gas Fitters 

We will continue to seek similar approvals in other career and technical fields as it is 
one other way of validating our offerings and ensuring that students are receiving 
instruction in skill areas needed for the twenty-first century workforce. 



94 



Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Program offers an Adult Cosmetology program during the 
day. The program runs from September to May and follows the high school calendar. 
Registration for this program takes place at the end of May each year. The Evening 
School Division enrolled approximately 500 students for the 2001-02 school year. 
Registration for the Evening Division takes place in September and January. 

Student Activities 

Skills USA-VICA is a national student organization serving trade, industrial, technical 
and health occupations students with leadership, citizenship and character 
development activities and programs. Members in high school trade preparatory and 
industrial cooperative programs have their own division and activities. Tri-County 
Skills USA-VICA during the 2000-2001 school year had 240 members in grade 10 
through 12. Members participated in community service projects. In February, 103 
students attended the Central District Competition. Forty-seven students qualified in 
their trade competition and one student qualified for state officer competition and 
earned the right to attend the state competition in April. At states, thirteen students 
won the right to compete at the national level held in Kansas City, Missouri during the 
last week of June. Two students received bronze medals for their efforts, and two 
students came in 5 th place. 

DECA is a national organization for high school students enrolled in a marketing 
program. DECA operates in 50 states, 4 U.S. Territories, and Canada and prepares its 
members to be America's future leaders in the field of marketing, management and 
entrepreneurship. Students compete in both written and oral competitions at the 
district, state and national levels. 

The National Honor Society, with 13 members in grades eleven and twelve, organizes 
events promoting scholarship, leadership, and service. This group sponsored the 
annual holiday food drive, which benefited the Franklin Food Pantry and the 
Woonsocket Soup Kitchen. Other projects included collecting money for Easter Seals 
at the basketball tournament in February, participating in Pennies for Patients in the 
spring, and sponsoring a Red Cross Blood Drive in May, as well as the 20-Mile Walk 
for Hunger. The Chapter again hosted a Leadership Breakfast for all students in 
leadership position. NHS hosts Honors Night ceremonies, assuming all organization, 
preparatory, and emceeing duties. 

Summary 

As we continue to provide for the educational needs of our students, we wish to thank 
District residents for their support and cooperation. In the future we intend to 
maintain the high educational standard that has earned Tri-County that support. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Karl Lord, Chairman, Medfield 



95 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2002 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the Medfield School Committee, I would like to thank the dedicated and 
talented individuals who make Medfield Public Schools one of the best school systems in 
the commonwealth. Superintendent Robert Maguire does a superb job of leading a 
talented group of administrators, teachers and support staff in maintaining the excellence 
in education that Medfield residents have come to expect. The results of the MCAS tests 
prove Medfield students continue to excel. They have raised the bar for participation in 
athletics, music, drama, extracurricular activities, volunteerism and civic duty. Their hard 
work, along with the support of their parents and the rest of the Medfield community, 
makes the Medfield school system one of the most desirable in the state. 

The business and budget reporting aspects of the school system are efficient and well run 
thanks to the fine work of Joseph Cucinotta, Director of Business Operations. The School 
Committee would also like to thank Kathleen Leader and Beverly Bennotti for all they do 
to help keep this committee informed and organized. 

At the start of the year, my colleagues on the School Committee (in order of length of 
time served) were William Tosches, Carolyn Casey, Steven Kramer and James Caine. I 
would like to thank each of them for their time and dedication in serving the Town of 
Medfield in this important, public service role. Mr. Caine decided not to seek a second 
term and the committee was fortunate to gain Debra Noschese as a member. Dr. Tosches 
has informed the committee he does not intend to run for another term. I especially 
would like to thank Dr. Tosches for his tireless advocacy for the children of Medfield for 
the past 12 years. We also would like to thank the student representatives to the school 
committee. Sarah Meaney graduated in June, and David Major joined the committee at 
the beginning of this school year. Their information and insight has been a valuable 
contribution to the committee. 

During the past year, the approved school building projects were competitively bid and 
construction was begun. The Memorial project was granted to the low bidder and, at this 
writing the project is on schedule. The high school /middle-school project was bid twice. 
The first bid came in over budget and the School Planning and Building Committee 
decided it was in the best interest of the town to re-bid the project. The second bid came 
in under budget. The project is behind schedule, but is progressing. I would like to thank 
the members of the Permanent School Planning and Building Committee, as well as 
every citizen of Medfield for their support of this project. 

This year's tenth graders became the first class for which passage of the Language Arts 
and Math MCAS tests became a graduation requirement. The students did well and 
administrators and teachers are helping the few students who need to improve their test 
scores in order to graduate. This year also became the first year for the federal (No Child 



97 



Left Behind) legislation. This legislation requires annual testing in grades 3-8 with the 
goal of having all students performing at a high level by 2014. In Massachusetts, the 
MCAS test scores are being used to measure progress. Though there have been no 
federal funds to accompany this legislation, Medfield has met the progress requirements 
for the first period of time analyzed. 

The School Committee was asked to take another look at the school calendar. A survey 
of both parents and teachers was conducted. At this writing the results are still being 
tabulated. 



The FY03 budget was approved after working closely with the Warrant Committee. The 
economic health of the state has declined precipitously this year and the School 
Committee is again working with the Warrant Committee to prepare a lean budget for 
FY04. While spending has been within budget, we have put on a "slow freeze" on 
spending to prepare for the difficult year to come. 

Medfield continued to work to bring the inequities in the distribution of state aid for 
education to the attention of our legislators. One problem is the system's inability to 
address rapid enrollment growth. Medfield 's enrollment has grown more than 40% since 
1993, compared with the state average of 1 1.6% for the same time period. I would like to 
thank Debbie Noschese and other community activists who helped lobby our legislators 
on this important issue. Our perseverance succeeded in getting a share of rapid- 
enrollment growth funds for Medfield. While Medfield is still not funded adequately, the 
increased funding was welcome. 

The Medfield Public Schools are run highly efficiently. Per pupil expenditures continue 
to be among the lowest in the state. Based on FY01 data, Medfield ranks 3 14 th out of 327 
school districts for per pupil spending. This places Medfield in the lowest 4% of districts 
in per pupil spending. The fact that Medfield educates its students for $5,825 per student 
compared with the state average of $7,561 is partly due to the efforts of a multitude of 
volunteers who performed countless tasks and raised funds for a variety of purposes. The 
Medfield Coalition for Public Education (MCPE) and the CSAs augment the school 
budget by providing enrichment programs and necessary items that are not included in 
the lean school budgets. The MCPE funded nearly $100,000 in grants for the year. We 
would like to thank all of the volunteers without whom the Medfield Schools could not 
function. 

My colleagues and I would like to commend Superintendent Robert Maguire on meeting 
his annual goals and for tackling the broad and diverse responsibilities of superintendent 
with diligence and perseverance. In his evaluation, committee members described Bob as 
"outstanding" and "extraordinary" for his work during the past year. 



98 



As a result of all the hard work of those mentioned above, Medfield enjoys one of the 
best school systems in the state. This is an achievement for which the entire community 
can be proud. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Susan C. Cotter, Chairman 
Medfield School Committee 




99 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Enrollment Figures 
As of October 1,2002 



Memorial School 




Kindergarten: 


206 


Grade 1 : 


262 


Ralph Wheelock School 




Grade 2: 


247 


Grade 3 : 


244 


Dale Street School 




Grade 4: 


251 


Grade 5: 


231 



Thomas A. Blake Middle School 



Grade 6 
Grade 7 
Grade 8 



246 
249 
256 



Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 

Grade 9: 187 

Grade 10: 219 

Grade 11: 187 

Grade 12: 154 



TOTAL: 2939 



100 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I am pleased to submit the annual report for the Medfield Public schools for the year 
2002. 

The appropriated budget for FY2003 was $18,719,565 and represents an increase of 
7.64% over the FY2002 appropriation. The budget process for FY2003 was complicated 
by the fact that the aid for local communities from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
was impacted by the general economic downturn. School funding from the State (Chapter 
70) was level funded by the legislature for the first time since the beginning of 
educational reform in 1993. The Town of Medfield was one of a small number of 
communities that benefited from an increase in Chapter 70 funds due to the School 
Committee's successful efforts to gain additional State funding for extraordinary 
enrollment growth. In addition, the School Committee voted to return to the town's 
General Fund $191,475 that was received from the State in enrollment funding. The 
School Committee also made an additional reduction of $120,000 from their budget 
request prior to the annual Town Meeting. Each of these prudent financial decisions by 
the School Committee contributed to an effort by all town departments to create a 
balanced budget under the limitations of Proposition 2 1/2. 

The October 1, 2002 enrollment was 2939 students. The enrollment by school was: 
Memorial School - 468, Wheelock School - 491, Dale Street School - 482, Blake 
Middle School - 751 and High School 747. The enrollment growth that the school system 
has been experiencing since the early 1990's has progressed through the middle school 
and will be creating significant growth at the high school for the next several years. 

The school administration and staff continued to work closely with the Permanent School 
Planning and Building Committee during the year. Due to concerns related to continued 
cost escalation for school construction projects in Massachusetts the Permanent School 
Building and Planning Committee submitted an article for $6,000,000 in additional 
funding to a Special Town Meeting in February. During the spring and early summer the 
Committee hired Sells-Greene Construction as the general contractor of the Memorial 
Elementary School project and Alexandra Construction to serve as general contractor of 
the High School/Middle School Projects. The projects are complicated additions and 
renovations that will proceed in a phased manner through a planned completion date in 
the 2004-2005 school year. 






101 



Staff development and training have continued to be significant areas of focus during the 
year. A system wide study group was organized in the spring to examine the area of 
mathematics. Teachers reviewed the Massachusetts State Curriculum Frameworks, 
Medfield Curriculum Maps and Benchmarks, conducted needs assessment activities and 
reviewed instructional materials as part of the study group. We plan to have 
recommendations from the study group for areas of improvement in the spring of 2003. 
We have also continued to work on the topics of Differentiated Instruction and the 
development of Essential Questions in all learning areas. 

Students in grades 3,4,5,6,7,8 and 10 continue to be tested annually by the 
Commonwealth through the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS). 
All students in the graduating class of 2003 will be required to pass the grade 10 test to 
receive their high school diploma. Under new regulations imposed by the federal 
governments No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation the MCAS testing is utilized to 
hold each school and school district accountable for annual educational improvement. 
Medfield' s first ratings released in the fall indicated that the students in Medfield had met 
or exceeded targets for improvement in the areas of mathematics and language arts. 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to all of the citizens of Medfield for 
their strong support of our educational programs. I would also like to extend my 
appreciation to all of the teachers, parents, support staff, administrators, school 
committee members and volunteers who continue to actively support our educational 
mission. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Robert C. Maguire 
Superintendent 



102 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STAFF DIRECTORY 



***** 



CENTRAL OFFICE 



Robert C. Maguire, BA,MEd 

Cucinotta, Joseph, AS,BS,MEd 

Cave, Kim, BS,MS 

Suby, Carol, BS, Masters 

Leader, Kathleen 

Bennotti, Beverly 

Floser, Anna 

Hirtle, Patricia 

Kavanaugh, Mary 

Boucher, Richard 

Sullivan, Colleen 

Moon, Martha 

Meaney, Donna 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director/ Finance & Operations 
Co-Director/Curriculum & Technology 
Co-Director/Curriculum & Technology 
Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
Secretary to the Superintendent 
Secretary to Dir/Finance & Operations 
Accounts Payable/Bookkeeper 
Payroll Officer 
Network Administrator 
Mail Transfer/Secretary, Business Office 
Secretary/Office of Curric. & Technology 
Technical Assistant/Curric. & Technology 



103 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Ashworth, Ann 


Principal 


BA, Miami University 


2000 






MS, The California State University, 


Fullerton 


Gibbs, David 


Dn/Students 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1970 


Nunes, Kathleen 


Dn/Academics 


BA, Framingham State College 

MA. Boston College 

MEd, University of MA, Boston 


2001 


Alexis, Marie 


Secretary 




2002 


Ingram, Maryjean 


Secretary 




1999 


Boyer, Laura 


Secretary 




2000 


Azer, Allen 


English 


BA, Northeastern University 
MS, Boston University 
MEd, Northeastern University 


1971 


Batts, Maura 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 


1993 


Bauer, Carol 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 


1999 


Bernier, Rita 


Art 


BA,BFA, Emmanuel College 
MEd,Lesley College 


1980 


Bertucci, Edward 


Science 


BS, University of Massachusetts 
MS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


1994 


Blessmgton, Patricia 


Business 


BS, California State/Long Beach 


1998 


Brophy, Kathleen 


Wellness/PE 


AB, Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2001 


Bruemmer, Paul 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, St. Mary's University of MN 
MA, University of St. Thomas 


2001 


Buckley, Sarah 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Bowdin College 


2000 


Coutinho, Paul 


Wellness/PE 


BS, Southern Connecticut State 

University 
MS, Northeastern University 


2002 


Cowell, Susan 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 


1984 


Delery, Andrew 


Mathematics 


BA, Providence College 


2001 


DeSorgher, Richard 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Mass/Amherst 
MA, University of Mass/Boston 


1976 


Dinno, Dalia 


Science 


BS, University of Toronto 
MAT, Simmons College 


2001 


Duffy, Gail ' 


English 


BA, Stonehill College 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

MSPC, Clark University 


2001 


Dugan, Ellen 


English 


BA, Mt. St. Mary College 


1987 


Emerson, Kathleen 


Social Studies 


BA, Providence College 
MAT, Simmons College 


2001 


Flanagan, Jacqueline 


Math(LOA) 


BS, Boston University 
MS, Suffolk University 


1997 



104 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Gait, Luanne 


Mathematics 


BA, Boston College 


1999 


Garcia-Rangel, Mary 


English 


BA, University of MA, Boston 
MAT, Tufts University 


2000 


Goss, Anne 


Library Asistant 




1998 


Guiness, James 


Mathematics 


BA, Wayne State University 
MBA, Columbia Pacific University 


2002 


Hamilton, Barbara 


Science 


BA, Wheaton College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1986 


Hardy, Adele 


Consumer & 
Family Science 


BS, Framingham State College 


1981 


Heller, David 


Writing Center 


BA, University of California,Santa Cruz 
MA, Emerson College 


2000 


Hobson, Sarah 


English 


BA, Dartmouth College 


1998 


Irwin, Ross 


Mathematics 


BEd, Leeds University, England 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Joseph, Vincent 


Social Studies 


BS, University of Bridgeport 
MS, Fitchburg State College 


1990 


Karnakis, Victoria 


Library Assistant 


1992 


Kinch, Terry 


Science Tech/ 
Computers 


BS, SUNY at Brockport 


1994 


Kirby Jonathan 


Wellness/AD 


BS, University of Bridgeport 
MS, Cambridge College 


1977 


Kraemer, Michael 


Mathematics 


BA, College of the Holy Cross 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 
MME, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


1993 


Kryzanek, Carol 


Science 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MA, University of Massachusetts 


1988 


Lee, Christine 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


1997 


Lindstrom, Paul 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Utah 

MEd, Framingham State College 


2001 


Mandosa, Frank 


English 


BA, St. Anselm College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2002 


McDermott, Janet 


English 


BA, Regis College 
MAT, Boston College 


1971 


McLain, Lynne 


Science 


BS,MST, Boston College 


1999 


McNamara, Deborah 


Library Assistant 


1999 


Monroe, Aileen 


English 


BA, Nazareth College 
of Rochester 


2002 


Mullen, Stephanie 


Library Assistant 


1999 


Nickerson, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Gettysburg College 

Masters, Framingham State College 

MEd, Worcester State College 


1995 


Noble, Judith 


Science 


BS, University of NH 


1974 



MEd, Worcester State College 



105 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Olsen, Douglas 


Dir. of Music 


BMusic, University of Massachusetts 
Masters, New England Conservatory 


1993 


Panciocco, John 


Soc.Studies/TV 


BS, University of Maine 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1998 


Pratt, Suzanne 


Science 


BS, University of Massachusetts 

MS, Central Connecticut State College 


1971 


Rosato, Marianne 


Mathematics 


BA, Boston College 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 


1998 


Rosenberg, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Mt. Ida College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2001 


Sabra, Ann Marie 


English 


BA, Worcester State College 


1995 


Safer, Jessica 


Mathematics 


BA, Assumption College 


2002 


Salka, Martin 


Permanent Substitute 
Lunchroom Assistant 


2002 


Savukoski, Sinikka 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Framingham State College 


2002 


Scharak, Robin 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, SUNY at Buffalo 
MA, Boston University 


1969 


Schmidt, Joanne 


Librarian 


BS, Framingham State College 
MLS, Simmons College 
MA, Emerson College 


2000 


Shapiro, Richard 


Science 


BS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
MS, Northeastern University 


1981 


Spencer, Ann 


Mathematics 


BA, Florida State University 
MEd, Lesley College 


1976 


Stevens, Nicholas 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Stockbridge, Gary 


Social Studies 


BA, Framingham State 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1970 


Tasi, Tracy 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Boston College 


2002 


Thomas, Caroline 


English 


BA, State University of New York 
MAT, Tufts University 


1998 


Tobiasson, Susan 


Art 


AA, Lasell College 

BA, Southern Connecticut State University 


1989 


Toubman, Ellen 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Connecticut College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2002 


Woods, Jane 


Mathematics 


BA, MAT Bridgewater State College 


1996 



106 



THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Mongiello, Margaret 


Principal 


BS,MA, Bowling Green State U. 


1997 


Hodne, Gordon 


Dean of Students 


BA, Barrington College 

MEd, University of Mass/Boston 


1966 


McHugh, Elizabeth 


Secretary 




1998 


Croce, Janet 


Secretary 




1999 


Skerry, Sharon 


Secretary 




2001 


Allen, Margaret 


Science 


BA, Middlebury College 


2002 


Ammon, Robert 


Science 


BS,MEd, East Stroudsburg State 


1967 


Ayers, Sandra 


English 


BS, MEd, Boston State College 


1995 


Beltran, Maria 


Foreign Language 


BS, Central University of Ecuador 


1997 


Brackett, Kenneth 


Physical Education 
Teacher Assistant 


BS,Westfield State 


1997 


Bucilla, Joanne 


Reading 


BA, Clark University 


2002 


Buckley, Susan 


Library Assistant 




1998 


Cohen, Wendy 


Science 


BS, Simmons College 


1988 


Craig, Kathleen 


Mathematics 


BA, Webster College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1981 


Dalpe, Cynthia 


Foreign Language 


BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1986 


Darling, Jeffrey 


English 


BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2001 


Dawson, Sarah 


Science/Reading 


BA, Ohio Wesleyan University 
MA, University of Colorado 


1997 


Demeritt, Deborah 


Science 


BS, University of Connecticut 
Masters, Cambridge College 


1974 


Dexter, Ryan 


Music/Band 


Bachelor of Music, University 
of Massachusetts 


2000 


Dorrie, Alyssa 


Foreign Language 


BA, Boston College 

MAT, University of Massachusetts 


2000 


Fahey, Loretta 


Health Education 


BS, University of Maine 


1980 


Farrell, Kara 


Mathematics 


BS, Bridgewater State 

MEd, University of MA,Lowell 


1998 


Farroba, Joseph 


Health/PE 


BS, Boston State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1978 


Gagne, Ian 


Reading 


BS, Boston University 


2000 


Gow, Michael 


Social Studies 


BS, University of Wisconsin 


2001 


Guditis, Steve 


Social Studies 


BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Harvard Graduate School 
of Education 


2002 


Gumas, Marissa 


Mathematics 


BA, Arcadia University 


2001 


Haycock, Jonathan 


Librarian 


BS, Boston University 


1998 



Heim, Jason 



Science 



MEd, Boston University 

BS, SUNY, Albany 2002 

MAT, Simmons College 



107 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Hellerstein, Seth 


Social Studies 


Hoffman, Janice 


English 


Horgan, Mary Susan 


Art 


Ibrahim, Susan 


Foreign Language 


Jalkut, Maryann 


Eng/Soc. Studies 


Krause, Dorothy 


Social Studies 


Lewandowski, Keri 


Mathematics 


Lombardi, Patricia 


Mathematics 


Manning, Deborah 


Social Studies 


McConnell, Ellen 


English 


Miller, Martha 


English 


Nelson, Carol 


English 


O'Neil, Joyce 


Physical Education 


Parsons, John 


Science/Reading 


Perutti, Stephanie 


Foreign Language 


Potts, Eve 


Consumer & Family 




Science 


Ramos, Paul 


Science 


Russell, Ellen 


Technology Assistant 


Shannon, Sarah 


English/Reading 


Shluger, Lisa 


Science 


Smith, Kristen 


Social Studies 


Stameris, Christine 


Mathematics 


Stameris, Philip 


Mathematics 



BA, Beloit College 1999 

MEd, University of VT 

CAS, Trinity College, VT 

BA, Emmanuel College 1973 

MA,University of Madrid, Spain 

BS, Moore College of Art & 1 975 

Design 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BS, Boston University 200 1 

MEd,Boston College 
BS, Framingham State College 1987 
BA, Framingham State College 1993 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, Bridgewater State College 2000 
MEd, Lesley University 
BA, St. Mary's College 1994 

MS, University of Notre Dame 
BA, Hamilton College 2002 

MEd, Lesley University 
BA, Marymount College 1 992 

MA, Northeastern University 
BA, Framingham State College 1988 
MEd, State College at Boston 
BA, University of Massachusetts 1 978 
MA, Boston College 
BS, University of Wisconsin 1993 

BA, College of Wooster 1 998 

BS, Framingham State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, University at Buffalo 200 1 

MAT, Simmons College 
BS, UCLA 2000 

MEd, Framingham State 
BA, Ithaca College 2001 

MS, Dowling College 

2001 
BA, Villanova University 1999 

MEd, Lesley College 
BA, University of Pennsylvania 2002 
MS, Antioch New England 

University 
BA,MAT, Connecticut College 2000 
BS,MS, State Univ. of NY 1999 

BS, University of Massachusetts 1997 
MSMFGE, Boston University 
MAT, Simmons College 



108 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Standring, Nancy 


Library Assistant 




1992 


Sullivan, Wendy 


Technology Assistant 




2002 


Taliaferro, Travis 


Social Studies 


BA,MEd, Plymouth State College 


2001 


Tasker, Geraldine 


Social Studies 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1986 


Vaughn, Nathaniel 


Mathematics 


BA, Trinity College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1998 


Vessa, Ben 


English/LA 


BS, Clarion University of PA 


1999 


Walker, Doris 


English 


BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 


1987 


Wroten, Theresa 


Music/Chorus 


Bachelor of Music 


2000 


Zaia, Diane 


Science 


AS, Westbrook College 
BS, Northeastern University 
MS, University of Rhode Island 


1995 



109 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



De Young, Richard 


Principal 


Cooley, Pauline 
Englehardt, Nancy 
Altoonian, Priscilla 
Bader, Kim 


Secretary 
Secretary 

Technology Assistant 
Librarian 


Belmont, Katherine 
Boyle, Veronica 


Grade 4 
Grade 4 


Burnham, Elizabeth 


Grade 4 


Carey, Pauline 


Health/PE 


Cauldwell, Mary 


Reading 


Crable, Heidi 
Curran, Kathleen 


Grade 5 
Grade 4 


Deveno, Nancy 


Art 


Dixon, Emily 


Grade 5 


Douglas, Michael 


Grade 4 


Driscoll, Joan 
Farley, Virginia 


Lunchroom Assistant 
Strings/Music 


Fromen, Deborah 
Harrington, Lauren 
Hams, Elizabeth 
Hollister, Laura 
Kirby, Joia 


Library Assistant 
Grade 4 

Lunchroom Assistant 
Grade 5 
Grade 4 


Kristof, Ann 
Lewis, Beth 
Mason, Michael 


Grade 4 
Grade 4 
Grade 5 



BA, Merrimack College 
MEd, Suffolk University 



BA,SUNY/Geneseo 
MS, Simmons College 
BS, Framingham State College 
BA, Assumption College 
MEd,Bridgewater State College 
BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Simmons College 
BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BS, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 
BS, University of Maine 
BS, University of Mass/Amherst 
MBA, Northeastern University 
BSA, Mass. College of Art 
MSAE,Mass. College of Art 
BA, Holy Cross 
MEd,Lesley College 
BS, Stonehill College 
MEd, Cambridge College 

Bachelor of Music & Education 
Syracuse University 

BA, Notre Dame College 

BS, MA, Simmons College 

BA, Trinity College 

MEd, Lesley College 

BS, Framingham State College 

BA, Boston College 

BS, Northeastern University 

MEd, Bridgewater State University 



1995 

1981 
1997 
1999 
2001 

1971 
1999 

1999 

1992 

1974 

1994 
2000 

1993 

2000 

1995 

1997 
2000 

2001 
1967 
1997 
2000 
1996 

1974 
2001 
1989 



110 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



McKechnie, Claire 


Grade 5 


McSherry, Stephanie 


Grade 4 


Moretti, Lynne 


Grade 4 


Nelson, Laura 


Grade 5 


O'Brien, Teri 


Grade 5 


Olson, Janice 


Grade 4 


Oxholm, Barbara 


Music 


Pendleton, Anne 


Reading 


Pope, William 


Physical Education 


Reynolds, Mairi 


Physical Education 


Sager, Bethany 


Grade 5 


White, Joseph 


Grade 5 


Woodman, Susan 


Grade 5 



1998 



1999 



1972 



BA, Boston College 1977 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, Trinity College 

MAT, Simmons College 

BS, Springfield College 

MEd, Lesley University 

BA, University of Massachsuetts 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, National College of Education 1984 

BS, Boston State College 1 973 

BM, University of Lowell 1 999 

MM, New England Conservatory 

BS, University of Southern Maine 

MA, University of Lowell 

Associate, Dean College 

BS, Springfield College 

BS, Boston University 

BA, Mount Holyoke College 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BS, Northeastern University 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 

BA, Boston University 1993 



1995 

1977 

2001 
1996 

1992 



111 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Pullman, Alan 


Principal 


Naughton, Karen 


Secretary 


Monahan, Luanne 


Secretary 


Allyn, Cynthia 


Grade 2 


Busconi, Elizabeth 


Grade 2 


Carey, Ann 


Grade 2 


Centore, Gwenneth 


Teacher Assistant 


Cowell, Thomas 


Physical Education 


Crandall, Jane 


Grade 2 


Deschenes, Noelle 


Grade 2 


Dunlea, Cheryl 


Grade 3 


Emerald, Nicole 


Grade 3 


Featherman, Nancy 


Grade 2 


Fine, Madeline 


Art 


Frewald, Dorothy 


Technology Assistant 


Grant, Ann 


Grade 2 


Guthrie, Kristen 


Grade 3 


Harlow, Kathleen 


Grade 3 


Hills, Sara 


Grade 3 


Interrante, Janice 


Grade 3 


Kuehl, James 


Grade 3 


Landry, Joan 


Grade 2 


Larensen, Cynthia 


Grade 3 


Lynn, Rachel 


Grade 3 


McCabe, Karen 


Health 



BA, American University 
MA,Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 



BS,Ed Lesley College 

MS, Lesley College 

CAS, Harvard Graduate School 

AB, Boston University 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BSEd, Framingham State College 

BA, University of Texas 

BS, Castleton State College 

MS, Indiana University 

BA, Boston College 

BA, Boston College 

BA, University of Rochester 

MEd, Boston University 

BA, University of Massachsuetts 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, University of Massachusetts 



1998 



1985 
2002 
1970 



1984 

1971 
1985 
1970 
1979 

2001 
1986 
2001 

1972 

2001 

1993 
1993 
1997 



BA, University of Massachusetts 

BA, University of Vermont 

MEd, Boston University 

BA, Stonehill College 2001 

MS, Wheelock College 

BS, Skidmore Colege 2001 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, Marywood University 1986 

BA, University of Arizona 1997 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, Boston College 2002 

BS, Springfield College 1 970 

MEd, Lesley College 

BS, North Adams State College 1 997 

M,SpecEd, Framingham State College 

BS, Purdue University 1996 

MEd, Bridgewater State University 



112 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Mitchell, Lori 


Grade 2 


Morris, Regina 


Grade 2 


Myers, Judith 


Reading 


Newton, Debra 


Grade 3(LOA) 


Parker, Susan 


Art 


Parmenter, Dorothy 


Music 


Pope, Susan 


Librarian 


Reiber, Elizabeth 


Grade 2 


Sheehan, Nicole 


Grade 3 


Silver, Andrea 


Grade 2 


Slason, Michael 


Physical Education 


Troob, Cynthia 


Reading 


Watson, Erin 


Grade 3 


Wile, Jacqueline 


Reading Assistant 



BA, University of Colorado 2000 

MAT, Simmons College 
BS, MEd, Framingham State 1976 

BA, Clark University 1998 

MS, Long Island University 
BA, MEd, University of New 1 996 

Hampshire 

BS, Skidmore College 1978 

MEd, Lesley College 
BA, Marymount College 1978 

MEd, Lesley College 
BA, University of Vermont 1979 

MLS, University of Illinois 
BA, Hamilton College 200 1 

MEd, Boston College 
BSEd,Bndgewater State College 1994 
MSEd, Wheelock College 
BA, American University 2001 

MEd, Lesley College 
BA, New Mexico Highlands Univ. 1986 
AA, Newton Junior College 1 969 

BS, Boston University 
MEd, Antioch College 
BA, University of New Hampshire 1995 
MEd, Lesley College 

1999 



113 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Levine, Barbara 


Principal 


BS, Northeastern University 
MEd, Boston State College 


2001 


Dnscoll, Marcia 


Secretary 




1989 


Policella, Lynn 


Secretary 




1998 


Anelauskas, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Bianchi, Michelle 


Grade 1 


BSEd, University of Maine 
MEd, Lesley College 


1970 


Colantoni, Juliana 


Grade 1 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Lesley University 


1991 


Cooney, Susan 


Reading 


BA, Tufts University 
MA, Simmons College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2001 


Cordelia, Brenda 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Cronin, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


DeYoung, Elizabeth 


Library Assistant 




2001 


DiMarzo, Barbara 


Grade 1 


BS, Boston State College 
MA, Lesley College 


1990 


Erickson, Margaret 


Grade l(LOA) 


BA, Washington College 
MAT, Simons College 


1996 


Estes, Kimberly 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Grace, Herbert 


Physical Education 


BS, Keene State College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1992 


Graham, Karen 


Physical Education 


BS, Boston University 


1989 


Green, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


1991 


Groden, Randie 


Librarian 


BA, University of Maryland 
MLS, Rutgers University 


2001 


Guilbert, Alison 


Grade 1 


BS, University of Vermont 
MA, Lesley University 


2001 


Guilmette, Gail 


Kindergarten 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 


: 1988 


Hedberg, Marie 


Kindergarten 


AB, Boston College 
MA, Lesley College 


1999 


Herring, Heather 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
MA, Lesley University 


2001 


Jones, Deborah 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Kay, Amy 


Grade l(LOA) 


BA,University of Massachusetts 
MA, Cambridge College 


2000 


Kinsman, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1980 


Maalouf, Raymonde 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Matson, Kathryn 


Technology Assistant 




1997 


McAvoy, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BS, Framingham State College 


2000 


McNicholas, Maura 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Mulock, Louise 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 



114 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Nicholson, Margaret 



Grade 1 



Nickerson, Jeninne 


Kindergarten 


O'Donnell, Ruth 


Teacher Assistant 


Oppel, Heidi 


Teacher Assistant 


Paget, Christine 


Grade 1 


Pendergast, Marie 


Grade 1 


Pollock, Allison 


Grade 1 


Ravmski, Kathleen 


Grade 1 


Reardon, Suzanne 


Reading Assistant 


Ruggiero, David 


Music 


Shay, Theresa 


Grade 1 


Shiff, Mary 


Art 


Singer, Laura 


Reading (LOA) 


Stoll, Tracey 


Kindergarten(LOA) 


Trasher, Andrea 


Grade 1 



BA, Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart 
MEd, Lesley College 
BS, Bridgewater State 



BS, Framingham State College 
MS, Lesley College 
BA, University of MA 
MEd, University of MA 

BA, University of Vermont 
MEd, Lesley College 
BA, Wheaton College 
MAT, Simmons College 

BS, Bryant College 
Masters, Central Connecticut 

State University 
BSEd, Bridgewater State College 
MSEd, Lesley College 
BFA, Mass. College of Art 
BS, St. Bonaventure University 
MA, University of Bridgeport 
BA, Ithaca College 
MEd, Lesley College 
BSBusAdmin, Northeastern 

University 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 



1978 



1998 
1991 
1998 
1990 

1998 



1992 

2001 

2002 
2002 

1972 

1997 
1990 

1997 

1994 






115 



PUPIL SERVICES 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


McArdle, Kathleen 


Director 


BS, Fitchburg State College 
MS, Simmons College 
MBA, Boston University 


1995 


Lowd, Diane 


Secretary 




1998 


Mitchell, Kim 


Secretary 




2000 


Davidson, Sandra 


Secretary 




1988 


Baine, Carol 


Guidance 


BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MEd, Boston University 
CAGS, Boston State College 


1972 


Beath, Maureen 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Bennett, Whitney 


Inclusion Coordinator 


BS, Union College 
MSW, Boston College 


2002 


Birkett, Janet 


Paraprofessional 




2000 


Bonney, Douglas 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Borona, Stacey 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Providence College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2000 


Bosh, Maryellen 


Psychologist 


BA, St. Anselm College 
MA, Tufts University 


1998 


Brown, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Chen, Joy 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, Oberlin College 
MS, Boston University 


1994 


Croke, Heather 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


DaCosta, David 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Donalds, Elizabeth 


Psychologist 


BFA, University of Colorado 


2000 






MS,CAGS, Northeastern Universi 


ty 


Dunn, Jean 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Frauenberger, Gretchen 


School Physician 






Fuglestad, Joanne 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Gertner, Patricia 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Ghantous, Carolyn 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Gordon, Beverly 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Pottsdam State University 
MSEd, The College of St. Rose 


1993 


Guglietta, Maureen 


Teacher Assistant 




1987 


Hodne, Scott 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Hollenbeck, Jill 


Psychologist 


BA, Oswego State University 
MEd, CAGS, University of Mass/ 
Boston 


2001 


Ikoma, Michael 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Krah, Kerrie 


Speech/Language 


BS, Marquette University 
Master of Arts, Hofstra University 


2000 


Krawec, Ann 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Lavallee, Susan 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Lesley College 


2002 


Lavelle, Patricia 


Speech/ Language 


BA, Marywood College 


1994 



MEd, Northeastern University 



116 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Lindgren, Bernadette 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Mahoney, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Maier, Heidi 


Speech/Language 


BA, Boston College 
MS, Boston University 


2000 


Mandosa, Heather 


Guidance 


BA, St. Anslem College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2001 


Marenghi, Matthew 


Guidance 


BA, University of Massachusetts/ 

Lowell 
MEd, Boston University 


2002 


May, Leslie 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


McLaughlin, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Mello, Felicia 


Teacher Assistant 




1989 


Meyer, Barbara 


Guidance 


BA, Rollins College 


2001 



Mullen, Patricia 

Nickerson, Alexandra 
Nilson, Holly 

O'Connor, Mary 
O'Grady, Conor 
Ormbeg, Erik 

Orsogna-Muir, Connie 
Patch, Mary 
Peterson, Steve 
Preikszas, Mary 
Principe, Alicia 
Pugatch, Diane 

Riccio, Julia 

Robinson, Judith 



Samson, Susan 

Scheld, Nancy 
Sherman, Rebecca 
Singer, Margaret 



Small, Cynthia 



Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 
Inclusion Coord/S&Lang 

Learning Specialist 
Teacher Assistant 
Guidance 

Teacher Assistant 

Nurse 

Teacher Assistant 

Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 

Learning Specialist 

Speech/Language 

Learning Specialist 



Nurse 

Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assisstant 
Occupational Therapist 



Teacher Assistant 



MA, University of Central Florida 

BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BA, University of Massachusetts 
MA, Washington State University 
BA, Providence College 

BA, Ithaca College 
MEd, Suffolk University 

BSN, University of Wisconsin 

BS, Frostburg State College 

BS, Boston University 
MS,Ed, Lesley College 
BA, Bates College 



2001 

1976 
1987 

2002 
2002 
1998 

1992 
1995 
2001 
1996 
2002 
1995 

2000 



MS, Teachers College, Columbia Univ. 



AB, Boston University 
Masters, Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 
BSN, Lowell State College 
MS, Boston University 



BA, SUNY/Oneonta 
MA, Adelphi University 
MS, Boston University 



1988 



1999 

1997 
2002 
1998 



2002 



117 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Snyder, Trinka 



Sockol, Dawn 



Psychologist 



Case Manager 



BA, MS, University of 2002 

Pennsylvania 
MBA, George Washington University 
CAGS, University of Massachusetts 



BA,MEd, Michigan State Univ 
CAGS, Rhode Island College 



Typadis, Angela 

Walunas, Kathryn 
Wood, Joan 

Woodhead, Sharon 
Zrike, Sara 



Integrated Preschool 

Learning Specialist 
Nurse 

Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 



MEd, Boston University 
BA, Stonehill College 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 
BA, Boston College 
RN, Boston City Hospital School 
of Nursing 



1985 



Speroni, Richard 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Stack, Karen 


Learning Specialist 


BS, MEd, Bridgewater State 
College 


1998 


Strekalovsky, Elizabeth 


Psychologist 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, Lesley College 

MEd, CAGS, University of MA 




Sullivan, Barbara 


Teacher Assistant 




1995 


Telia, Nancy 


Nurse 


BSN, Boston College 


2002 


Thompson, Kathleen 


Nurse 


BS, Salem State College 
MS, Boston College 


1997 


Triest, Sherry 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Turan, Sari 


Guidance 


BS, University of Massachusetts 


2000 



1989 

1991 
1975 

2001 
1999 



118 



FOOD SERVICES 



Miller, Terry 

Anderson, Ruth 

Andrews, Donna 

Brown, Angela 

Clark, Heather 

David, Denise 

DeRoche, Nancy 

Diclemente, Elaine 

Evans,, Sandra (Manager) 

Hatch, Misty 

Hill, Mary 

Hughes, Janice 

Jones, Christina (Manager) 

Konevich, Stephanie (Manager) 

LaPlante, Laurie (Manager) 

Manning, Linda 

McCarthy, Hazel 

Mullen, Joanne 

Nelson, Carol (Manager) 

Norton, Nancy 

Szylkonis, Fran 

Vieira, Sarah 

Wilkinson, Regina (Supervisor) 



Secretary 
High School 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
High School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
High School 
Dale Street Shool 
Dale Street School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Blake Middle School 
Memorial School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Dale Street School 
Memorial School 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
Dale Street School 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
Food Services 



PLANT MANAGEMENT 



Sillverio, Robert 

Brown, Wayne 

Burton, Linda 

Currier, Richard (Head Custodian) 

Floser, Ronald 

Glassman, Barry 

Guy, Steven 

Hinkley, Paul 

Howland, George (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Donald (Head Custodian) 

Kadehjian, Robert (Head Custodian) 

MacPherson, John(Head Custodian) 

Martin, Henry 

Murphy, Brian 

Norian, Paul 

Quayle, Thomas 

Rogers, Thomas 

Spillaine, Bernie 

Stavris, Kenneth 

Vogel, Keith 

Volpicelli, Brian 



Director 

Middle School 

Floater 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Maintenance 

Dale Street School 

Central Office 

Memorial School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Maintenance 

Blake Middle School 

Maintenance Technician 

High School 

Memorial School 

Ralph Wheelock School 



119 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND 

OPERATIONS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit to the citizens of Medfield the Annual Town Reporl 
as the Director of Finance and Operations. The period of January 1, 2002 through 
December 31, 2002 proved to be a challenging and rewarding year in the areas of finance 
and operations. 

During the year, the Medfield Public Schools continued to address the maintenance and 
facilities needs for the Medfield schools. The School Committee and administration 
continued to implement the five (5)-year capital budget plan that addresses the need foi 
short- and long-term facility objectives. This plan is responsible in keeping the town's 
school facilities functional, safe, and attractive. 

At the Special Town Meeting on February 11, 2002, the town voted to appropriate an 
additional six million dollars ($6,000,000) in funds to the School Planning and Building 
Committee and School Committee to support the original plans voted at the Special 
Town Meeting on January 22, 2001. This new request was a result of increased 
construction demands and the escalating cost of new and renovation of building projects. 

It has been a goal to fund on-going maintenance projects for all school buildings. We 
will continue to replace rugs, school furniture, and paint classrooms each year. In 
addition, repairs to our infrastructure have been completed in the following areas: 1) 
Memorial boiler, 2) HVAC, 3) heating systems, and 4) electrical and plumbing repairs. 

The town granted a total of $106,333 in capital funds. These funds were used for the 
third payment for the modular classrooms at the Dale Street School. 

In developing the FY03 Budget, the School Committee and administrators worked in 
conjunction with the Warrant Committee to develop a strategy to meet the fiscal needs oi 
the Medfield Public Schools. 

The process for developing the budget begins in September with input from numerous 
groups: principals, parents, superintendent of schools, director of finance and operations, 
site councils, and school committee. They all have an important part in preparing the 
school budget. 

Due to the uncertainty of the State budget, the town decided to hold its Annual Town 
Meeting on June 10, 2002. Both the Warrant Committee and the School Committee 
reached a consensus prior to Town Meeting. The School Committee and administration 
agreed to provide additional funds of $191,475 to assist in the budget process that 



120 



included extensive meetings and negotiations with the Warrant Committee in order to 
reach an agreement on the FY03 budget to avoid an override. In addition, because of the 
uncertainty of State funds, the Medfield Public Schools cut an additional $120,000 from 
its budget request. The June 2002 Town Meeting approved the operational budget of 
$18,719,565 or 7.64 percent increase. This was an increase of $1,328,453 over the last 
year's budget. 

The Medfield Public Schools are most appreciative of the financial support that was 
rendered by the Warrant Committee and the residents of Medfield. 

The School Lunch Program continues to provide appetizing, nutritional, and well- 
balanced meals that are low in sodium and fat content. Providing good health and 
nutrition has always been a concern. Government regulations require that our school 
lunch program comply with the American Dietary Guidelines including foods from the 
food pyramid. Our program will concentrate on improving 1) menus, 2) financial 
independence (self-sufficient operation), 3) purchasing, and 4) marketing. 

In conclusion, I would again like to thank the people of Medfield for their 
encouragement and for their continued support as I approach my fifth year as Director of 
Finance and Operations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph P. Cucinotta 

Director of Finance and Operations 




121 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY 
HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Amos Clark Kingsbury (Medfield) High School, I respectfully submil 
our Annual Report for the school year ending December 31, 2002. 

The official enrollment for the high school for the 2002-2003 school year was 747 
students. One hundred seventy-five (175) students graduated in the class of 2002. Oi 
these, 90 percent have gone on to further their studies at post-secondary institutions ol 
learning. 

The school year was marked by great achievement on the part of many students. In the 
National Honor Society were 33 percent of the members of the graduating class. Jordan 
Caliguire and Katherine Clopeck were selected as Honor Essayists by the high school 
faculty and were presented with their awards after their speeches at the graduation 
ceremony June 2nd. 

The National Merit Scholarship Corporation honored a number of students for academic 
excellence. Named as Commended Students in the 2002 National Merit Program were 
Amy Bauer, Michelle Bauman, Russell Entrikin, Allison Jones, Megan Kenney, Shannon 
Lindgren, Peter Mitchell, Anna Murray, and Victoria Ruocco. 

More than 99 percent of our graduating seniors took the College Board Examinations. 
Our SAT I and SAT II scores were well above state and national averages. We are 
pleased to announce that our verbal mean score was 543 ; our mathematics mean score 
was 556. MCAS scores for tenth grade students who took the MCAS in April and May 
were the highest ever. On the School Accountability Report Card, Medfield High School 
rated "very high" in Performance on English/Language Arts and mathematics sections ol 
the test, and "above target" on the Improvement cycle in both English and mathematics. 
Both are the highest ratings available. 

The school year opened with a new first day of school program designed to improve the 
transition of students from the middle school to the high school. Our annual Call to 
Excellence Program featured the Norfolk Attorney General William Keating and his stafl 
presenting information to parents and students regarding the rights and responsibilities ol 
teenagers, a session on dietary supplements, and a session on personal safety and the 
"Model Mugging" program. 

A new academic awards program was designed to motivate and honor students in grades 
nine through eleven. Held just before the close of school in June, students were selected 
for their academic effort and achievement in all areas of the curriculum. Nearly twenty 



122 



percent of the student body earned recognition in this well-received program called, An 
Evening of Excellence, which serves as a bookend to our fall Call to Excellence program. 

Medfield High School students also excelled beyond the classroom (please see the report 
of the Director of Athletics). Nearly ninety percent of the student body elected to 
participate in student government, a school club, music, drama, or athletic programs. Our 
Concert Band and Concert Choir received silver medals at the Massachusetts MICCA 
Festival with the Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Choir earning a gold and silver medal, 
respectively. The Jazz Ensemble was awarded a gold medal at the State Competition and 
performed on the Boston's Hat Shell. Students in our music program competed at the 
Music Festivals Competition in Baltimore, in the spring where the Concert Band, Jazz 
Ensemble, and Orchestra each took first place. 

Our Theater Program presented Anything Goes! as its spring musical to sold-out houses 
each night. 

Professional development goals for faculty and staff included continuing our work with 
curriculum mapping and essential questions, as well as adding the development of unit 
maps and the integration of differentiated instruction. Faculty in-service programs 
included emergency response preparedness as well as specific work with curriculum 
goals. High School staff also began the work of revising the Mission Statement and 
developing Learner Outcomes as a part of the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges (NEAS&C) accreditation process. Parents, students, and faculty have all agreed 
upon these new statements. 

Our instructional program was enhanced as we upgraded our English curriculum to 
include a full-year of English Literature as a requirement for all students. In addition, our 
science department's on-going curriculum revision includes a change so that all students 
in grade 9 now take Biology. In addition, we added a new elective course to our wellness 
curriculum which is particularly timely: Personal Safety (which focuses on students 
learning self-defense strategies). 

Thirteen new staff members joined the faculty at Medfield High school due to 
retirements, turnover, and growth: Maura Batts assumed the role of Foreign Language 
Content Specialist; Paul Coutinho, wellness and physical education; Madeline Fine, art; 
Jim Guinness, mathematics; Susan Johnson, special education; Francis Mandosa, English 
and theater arts; Aileen Monroe, English; Erik Ormberg, guidance; Jessica Safer, 
mathematics; Sinikka Savukoski, foreign language; Trinka Snyder, school psychology; 
Tracy Tasi, foreign language; and Ellen Toubman, foreign language. 

Our Booster Club provided support for a variety of items we would not have been able to 
fund in the high school including; financial support of the All-Night Graduation Party, 
various mini-grants for teacher projects; healthy snacks and treats for MCAS testing; and, 
last but not least, a sizable contribution towards our school goal of funding a wireless 



123 



computer lab. Combined with a gift from the Class of 2002 and the Medfield Coalition 
for Public Education, that goal has been realized, effectively providing an additional 
computer laboratory for teachers and students. The Music Boosters continue to provide 
invaluable financial assistance to our bands and choirs. 

Our Student Council provided a number of events to raise money for disaster relief. Over 
$2000 was raised in mid-October when students organized its second 5k "Unity" 
walk/run in memory of 9/1 1 victims. 

We continue to prepare for the impending building project that will allow us to house the 
students who will soon arrive at our doorsteps. The school year began with students, 
staff, and guests using the new entrance to the high school, and shortly thereafter, new 
parking lots open to students and staff. The end of the year saw progress on the addition 
to the Kingsbury building. Two new portable classrooms have been installed behind the 
gymnasium in order to provide for overflow students. We intend to insure that all 
students' educational programs go uninterrupted during the impending building project. 

Connie Jones, Class of 1967, was honored at Class Day as the fourth recipient of the 
"Hall of Excellence" award, given to a Medfield High School graduate whose effort and 
participation in her high school experience has led to a successful, productive, rewarding 
and distinguished career. Ms. Jones was selected for her contributions to the children of 
Medfield. 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I am extremely pleased with the many 
achievements of our students and faculty. On behalf of all of our stakeholders, I take this 
opportunity to thank the following groups and individuals for their generosity to high 
school students and programs: Medfield High School Boosters; the Medfield Coalition; 
the School Committee; the School Planning and Building Committee; the Superintendent 
of Schools and the many parents and community members for their continued support of 
young people and their programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann L. Ashworth 
Principal 




124 



I he 115 Commencement 
Exercises 01 



MEDFIELD 
HIGH SCHOOL 




I he Amos Clark Ixlnqsbupij high Ochool 

CLASS OF 2002 
SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2002 - 2:00 PM 



125 



GRADUATION PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL M< L dfiel ? High School Band 

Douglas A. Olsen, Director 

NATIONAL ANTHEM Elizabeth H. Gryska 

OPENING REMARKS '. Robert C. Maguire 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME .. .Christine M. Priante 

President, Class of 2002 

HONOR ESSAYISTS Jordan M. Calaguire 

Kathenne L. Clopeck 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Case Y W - Hatten 

Treasurer, Class of 2002 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 2002 Carolyn P. Casey 

Medfield School Committee 

CHORAL SELECTION Senior Choir 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honors Awards Ann L Ashworth 

Principal 

Robert Flagg Memorial Scholarship Steven Kramer 

Medfield In-town Charities Scholarships Medfield School Committee 

Bayer Corporation Diagnostics Division Scholarship Debra Noschese 

Carlos Andrade Dunkin Donuts Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

Potpourri Collection Scholarship William Tosches 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarships Medfield School Committee 

The League of Women Voters of Medfield Carolyn Casey 

Community Service Scholarship Medfield School Committee 
Medfield High School Lamp of Learning Award 
Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Awards Beth Eb y 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship Michael McQuillan 

In Memory of Roger C. Rao 

Medfield Employers 8b Merchants Organization Award Deborah Bero 

M.H.S. Athletic Association Scholar/ Athlete Awards Jonathan Kirby 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Laurie Hood 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships Karl Schwartz 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Medals Comdr. Amer. Leg. Lt. Col. U.S. Army Ret. 
Sons of The Legion Scholarships 

Medfield Youth Baseball Scholarships William OMalley 

Medfield Italian American Cultural Association Scholarships Frank Zappulla 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Steven Sma11 



126 



Medfield High School Theatre Society Awards Sarah Ruter 

David E. Medeiros Theatre Society Scholarship 

Medfield Soccer, Inc. Scholarships Robert In 8 ram 

Student Council Awards Richard DeSorgher 

Tim Bussow Memorial Scholarship (Sponsored in part by Coca-Cola) 
Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship 

Medfield Youth Sports Boosters Scholarships Thomas MacNeil 

Friends of the Medfield Library Amy Fiske Creative Writing Award Jennifer Drew 

National Honor Society Scholarships Richard Shapiro 

Medfield Sportsmen Club's Harry H. Sonenburg Memorial Scholarship 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship Cynthia Bajdek 

Medfield Music Association Scholarships Douglas Olsen 

Lowell Mason Education Scholarship 
Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship 

William Palumbo Baseball Scholarship John LaRocca 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards Robert Santoro 

Medfield School Boosters, Inc. School Spirit Awards Christine Taft 

Medfield School Boosters, Inc. Community Service Awards Gayle Kendall 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Award David Gibbs 

Peter Kennedy Memorial Scholarship 

Medfield Youth Basketball Association Bob Porack Memorial Awards 

Charles P. Love Memorial Scholarship Kathleen Nunes 

Thomas Family Dental Services Scholarship 

Medfield High School Academic Excellence Award 

Medfield Police Daniel McCarthy Memorial Scholarship Lorna Fabbo 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship Michael Peimonte 

VP Risk Management & Compliance 

Peter Panciocco Scholarship Award Robert Bums 

Medfield Youth Hockey Doug Woodruff Scholarship 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Claudette O'Brien 

Hannah Adams/ Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

Carolyn P. Casey Medfield School Committee 

Robert C. Maguire Superintendent of Schools 

Ann L. Ashworth Principal 

recessional Medfield High School Band 

*PLEASE REFRAIN FROM APPLAUSE UNTIL ALL GRADUATES HAVE 
RECEIVED THED* DEPLOMAS 



127 



CLASS OF 2002 SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

PRESENTED AT SENIORS HONORS RECOGNITION NIGHT 
WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2002 

Rochester Institute of Technology Presidential Scholarship Kimberly Miller 

Wentworth Institute of Technology Merit Scholarship Christopher Hardy 

Scholarship Management Services Verizon Foundation Justin Biedrzycki 

Stetson University Dean's Scholarship David Holborn 

Saint Anselm College Scholarship Allison Dorr 

Saint Anselm Rev. Dominic Scherer OSB Scholarship Allison Don- 
University of Hartford Alumni Award Marissa Pochebit 

University of Connecticut Frances E. Osborne Kellogg Fund Scholarship . . . Erica Jacobson 

The University of Vermont Presidential Scholarship Geoffrey Frazier 

Pratt Institute Presidential Scholarship Emily Bowling 

The United States Military Academy Andrew Bowling 

The United States Military Academy Amy Bauer 

Rochester Institute of Technology Presidential Scholarship Anna Murray 

Rochester Institute of Technology Honors Scholarship Anna Murray 

Roger Williams University Achievement Scholarship Robin Nichols 

Hartford University Alumni Award Kevin Caragher 

University of New Hampshire Award Rachel Larson 

The George Washington University Presidential Academic Scholarship Peter Mitchell 

Saint Joseph's University Achievement Scholarship Sarah Meaney 

The University of Vermont Presidential Scholarship Kelly Klempa 

Bryant College Award Scott Wood 

Bryant College Award Christopher Gumas 

Mahindra United World Colleges Scholarship Geeta Tadepalli 

West Virginia University Blue & Gold Scholarship Kristen Orcutt 

Ladies Auxiliary of Walpole VFW Post #5188 Scholarship. Philip Gedarovich 

Rochester Institute of Technology Presidential Scholarship Philip Gedarovich 

Villanova University Naval ROTC Scholarship Mark Burchill 

Saint Michael's College Honor Scholarship Melanie Harvey 

Bourne Recreation Authority Jerry Cahir Memorial Scholarship Scott MacCready 

Plymouth State College Scholarship Brendan Hartery 

Medway Federation of Teachers Scholarship Andrew Aloma 

Medway Federation of Teachers Scholarship. Sarah Dolan 

COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS 

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AWARD: Amy Bauer 

SAMARITANS HOPE AWARD: Allison Krasnow 

MSSAA STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS: Matthew Arnold 

Meghan Ingram 
THE PATRIOT AWARDS: 

Matthew Arnold Katherine Clopeck David McCabe John Rapone 

Amy Bauer Meghan Ingram James McCloud Michael Rugnetta 

Jordan Calaguire Sarah Meaney Christine Priante Anna Strimaitis 

Ijeoma Uzoma 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT AWARDS: 

Matthew Arnold Paul Ciancarelli David McCabe Christine Priante 

Amy Bauer Katherine Clopeck Stephanie McClay John Rapone 

Andrew Bowling Geoffrey Frazier James McCloud Anna Strimaitis 

Patrick Cahill Casey Hatten Michael McNeil Ijeoma Uzoma 

Meghan Ingram Sarah Meaney 



128 



PAT KALLIO SERVICE AWARDS: 

Matthew Arnold Katherine Clopeck Kristen Heavey Anna Murray 

Amy Bauer Elizabeth Gryska Michael McNeil Caitlin Walsh 

PEER LEADER AWARDS: 

Amy Bauer Geoffrey Frazier Meghan Kenney Julie Taricano 

Allison Dorr Benson Hinga Allison Krasnow John Rapone 

Laura Duncan Meghan Ingram Michael LaCerda 



DEPARTMENT AWARDS 



ART: 



Excellence in Art Awards Emily Bowling 

Kimberly Miller 
ENGLISH: 

English Award Michelle Bauman 

Creative Writing/ Literary Magazine Award Michael Rugnetta 

Speech Awards Patrick Cahill 

Kathleen Schwartz 

Yearbook Award Geoffrey Frazier 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 

Northeast Conference "Excellence in Language Study" Awards. . .Latin Russell Entrikin 

French Nicole Eby 

Spanish . . . Matthew Arnold 

National Latin Exam Awards Magna Cum Laude Sarah Dolan 

Victoria Ruocco 

Summa Cum Laude. . Russell Entrikin 

Cum Laude. . . . Sean Mangan 

Scott Wood 

MATHEMATICS: 

Academic Excellence: AP Calculus Award Peter Mitchell 

Academic Excellence: AP Statistics Award Amy Bauer 

American Mathematics Competition Award Anna Murray 

American Invitational Mathematics Examination Award Russell Entrikin 

MUSIC: 

John Philip Sousa Band Awards Gregory Genatossio 

Meghan Ingram 

Louis Armstrong Jazz Awards Matthew Arnold 

Scott Wood 

National School Choral Awards Michelle Bauman 

Nicole Eby 

National School Orchestra Award Anna Murray 

SCIENCE. 

Biology Awards Kristin Moss 

Kathleen Schwartz 

Chemistry Awards Amy Bauer 

Anna Murray 

Physics Awards Russell Entrikin 

Peter Mitchell 

Electronics and Emerging Technology Awards Michael CMalley 

Ryan Sell 

Society of Women Engineers Highest Honors Anna Murray 

High Honors Katherine Clopeck 

Honors Amy Bauer 

SOCIAL STUDIES: 

Social Studies Award Patrick Cahill 

WELLNESS. 

Health and Wellness Outstanding Participation Awards Meghan Ingram 

Jeffrey Miner 



129 



JORDYN ASHLEY ACCONCIA 

OBIAJULU AMALACHAKWU ADUBA 
'MELISSA HARR1ETTE AGRIMANAKIS 

ULLY MARGARITA ALFARO 
'ANDREW MICHAEL ALOMA 

AMANDA KYLE ALT1MAR 
+-*MATTHEW WILLIAM ARNOLD 

JOSEPH ROBERT AYOTTE 

RICHARD WILLIAM BADER 

CHRISTOPHER DAVID BARDELU 
+-*AMY LYNNE BAUER 
+~*MICHELLE KRISTINE BAUMAN 

JUSTIN DAVID B1EDRZYCKI 

HEATHER BIRKETT 
*ASHLEY LOVE BORELL 

ANDREW THOMAS BOWLING 

EMILY VIRGINIA BOWLING 
*MEUSSA CHRISTINE BRAYTON 

ALEX HARRISON BROOKS 

TIMOTHY STEPHEN BUCKLEY 

MARK AARON BURCHILL. 

ALEXANDER SIDNEY BURRELL 

KYLE FRENCH BUSHONG 

PATRICK RHODES CAHILL 
+-* JORDAN MICHAEL CALAGUIRE 

KEVIN BARRY CARAGHER 

ROSS ANDREW CARDAREUJ 

KRISTEN MARIE CENTOLA 
*PAUL JOSEPH CIANCARELU 
+~*KATHERINE LORRAINE CLOPECK 

JOHN THOMAS CONNELLY 

ANDREW THOMAS COOK 

SEAN CLARRIDGE CORKHUM 

EMILY JEAN CORLESS 

JAMES PATRICK CROKE 
*NATAL1E GENEROSO CUSANO 

PHILUP SAMUEL DeROCHE 
-*SARAH ELIZABETH DOLAN 
*ALUSON JANE DORR 
*LAURA BLAIR DUNCAN 

JENNIFER MARIE DUNN 
+-*N1C0LE ELIZABETH EBY 

LAUREN CLAIRE EFSTATHIOU 
*SUSAN LYN EMSUE 
+-*RUSSELL CHRISTOPHER ENTRIKIN 

RYAN EDWARD FITZGERALD 

KATIE ANN FITZPATRICK 

JONATHAN ROBERT FORD 
*GEOFFREY GEORGE FRAZIER 
-*PHIUP JORDAN GEDAROVICH 

GREGORY MICHAEL GENATOSSIO 

MICHAEL JOSEPH GORMAN 
*KYLE GORDON GREAVES 

ELIZABETH HALSTED GRYSKA 

PATRICK DONALD GUDAITIS 

CHRISTOPHER PAULGUMAS 

JESSICA ANN HAMILTON 

BRIAN JEFFREY HAPENNEY 
*BRADLEY CHRISTOPHER HARCOURT 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2002 

CHRISTOPHER ROGER HARDY 

BRENDAN JAMES HARTERY 

MELANIE MILAGROS HARVEY 

RAMSEY HATHOUT 

CASEY WALSH HATTEN 

KRISTEN EUZABETH HEAVEY 

WILUAM PATRICK SESSION 

BENSON MBUGUA H1NGA 

DANIEaE ERIN HOCKABOUT 

ANDREA MARIE HOGAN 

DAVID ANTHONY HOLBORN 

DANIEL DUST1N HOOD 

RICHARD FRANCIS HOWE III 

MICHAEL JAMES HYNES 

MEGHAN KATHLEEN INGRAM 

LAURA JEAN JACKSON 
*ERICA LYNN JACOBSON 
*KEVIN MOORE JOHNSON 

SAMUEL LEWIS JOHNSON 

KELLY ANN KAVANAUGH 
+-*DIANA LYNN KEARNEY 

JULIA CATHERINE KEAVENEY 

MICHAEL RICHARD KELCOURSE 

DEVIN MICHAEL KELLY 

JOHN ROSS KENDALL 
*JOYCE PRANCES KENNEDY 
+~*MEGHAN LYNN KENNEY 

JAMES MCCARTHY KEPPLE 
*N1ARI ZEVART KEVERIAN 

JENNIFER MARGOT K1ERNAN 

KELLY MARIE KLEMPA 
-*DIANA MICHELLE KOCH 
*CHRISTINE MARIE KOSC 
*ALUSON IRENE KRASNOW 

RACHEL MEUSSA KUSHNER 
*M1CHAEL JOSEPH LaCERDA 

RACHEL MARY LARSON 

MICHAEL WILUAM LEACH 
*KENDRAANNLEE 

CONNOR JAMES LENNON 

SHANNON ELIZABETH UNDGREN 

TARA ELYSE LINES 

DAVID GORMAN LOUTTIT 

JENNIFER MARY LYNCH 

SCOTT ADAMS MacC READY 

SEAN PATRICK MANGAN 

KATHERINE REID MARTIN 

ROBERT MICHAEL MARTIN 

THOMAS JAMES MAWHINNEY 

DAVID SWEENEY MCCABE 

STEPHANIE LYNN MCCLAY 
*JAMES MICHAEL MCCLOUD 
*JESSICA LEIGH MCELROY 

MICHAEL THOMAS MCGOWAN 

PAUL MICHAEL MCINTYRE 
*JULIE ANNE MCNEIL 
-*MICHAEL ROBERT MCNEIL 



MEGAN ELIZABETH McNICHOLAS 
*SARAH EUZABETH MEANEY 
+-*KIMBERLY JEANNE MILLER 

JEFFREY RICHARD MINER 

JAMES MICHAEL MITCHELL 
+-*PETER JAMES MITCHELL 

JACOB BENJAMIN MOBLEY 

LAUREN ELIZABETH MOMBOURQUETTE 
+~*KRJSTIN LESUE MOSS 

CHARLES RAYMOND MULLEN 
+-*ANNA UNDSEY MURRAY 

ANDREW RODNEY NEWMAN 

ROBIN NICHOLS 

BRET STEVEN NORTON 
*PETER TERENCE CUNNINGHAM O'BRIEN 
*KERRI ELIZABETH OlEARY 

MICHAEL FRANCIS 0*MALLEY 

KRISTEN NICOLE ORCUTT 

CASSANDRA JOY PAPADONIS 

CASEY EUZABETH PARSONS 

MATTHEW BRAYTON PERKINS 

TYLER BRAYTON PHELPS 

KIRSTEN MARIE PHILLIPS 

MAR1SSA LOUISE POCHEBIT 

CHRISTINE MARIE PRIANTE 

JOHN CHRISTOPHER RAPONE 

STEVEN JOHN RECCO 
+-*UURA ANN RESNIK 
-*MEGHAN EUZABETH ROBINSON 
*AMANDA MARIE ROCHE 
*MICHAEL JOSEPH RUGNETTA 
+-* VICTORIA LEIGH RUOCCO 
-*KATHLEEN MICHELLE SCHWARTZ 

ASHLEY LAURA SEILER 
+-*RAMI ASHRAF SEUM 
-*RYAN NELSON SELL 

IAN ANDREW NEILSON SIMONI 

BLAIR STEPHEN SOUTHCOTT 
*MARISSA ALAINE STASHENKO 

MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER STENQUIST 

WILUAM EDWARD STEVENS 
+-*ANNA MARGARET STRIMAmS 

MORGAN KELSEY STUART 

CHRISTOPHER MARK SULLIVAN 
*GEETA SANTOSH1 TADEPALU 

JULIE MARIE TARICANO 

MARA DOMINICA TASCIONE 

MEGHAN MARIE TERWILUGER 
*KATHRYN EUZABETH THOMAS 

BRANDON MICHAEL TODESCA 

RACHELLE SUZANNE TRUMBOUR 
*UEOMA KJMEERLY UZOMA 

KEEGAN FREDERICK VAN SICKLEN 

BRETT RICHARD VOLLMUTH 
•CAITUN ELEANOR WALSH 

SARAH ALLEN WERNEKEN 
*ANDREW ALLEN WILSON 

SCOTT ANDREW WOOD 

GREGORY JOHN ZAIA 



MARSHALLS 



JOHN REARDON 



KATHRYN CIANFROCCA 



•NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 
+RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 
EDUCATION AWARD 



130 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL CIRCA 1887 




AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 2002 



MEDRELD HIGH SCHOOL 

GtWXJATOi 

2002 



131 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Thomas A. Blake Middle School, it is my pleasure to submit this 
annual report ending December 31, 2002. It has been a year that has been dominated by 
construction not only of the new physical plant going up around the middle school but 
also of programs and strategies to more successfully meet the varied needs of our 
emerging adolescent population. 

Construction plans began late last year and after much discussion, debate and town input, 
the process began. The goal is that the middle school will move to the Kingsbury 
Building with a small addition of eight classrooms, and the high school population will 
return to a much expanded and renovated Blake building. Until this happens, bulldozers 
and construction meetings have become a part of our everyday happenings. Concern for 
safety has been our number one issue and has promoted close collaboration with police 
and fire as new fire exits, traffic patterns and room barriers have been instituted. With a 
few exceptions, the educational programs have not been impacted, and every effort will 
be made to assure that continues. 

To help students and staff better handle the challenges of construction, the whole school 
read Shipwrecked at the Bottom of the World, an historical look at Shackleton's survival 
in the Antarctica. Drawing much from his harrowing experiences, we identified the need 
for teamwork, perseverance, resourcefulness, courage and leadership. In every content 
area, students made connections between this historical event and what we need to learn 
today. Mr. Lannon, a parent, loaned the school many original navigational tools and a 
replica of Shackleton's Endurance from his shop in Boston. Our unit culminated in the 
entire community going to the Boston Museum of Science to see the Shackleton and 
Lewis and Clark films. Through many hands-on and historical and scientific experiences, 
students were able to answer the essential question "How do you face struggles and 
capitalize on opportunities?" 

The demands of an increasing population were the impetus for the physical building 
construction, but the increasing directives from the state and the diverse needs of our 
learners drove our decisions to implement new strategies and redesign some current 
programs. Although Blake has been in the top five schools in the State in the English/ 
Language Arts MCAS, there are still too many children that struggle with reading, 
especially as they move from the more concrete process of learning to read to the abstract 
goal of reading to learn. At the same time, some of our students are reading way above 
grade level. This same skill range exists in math. To try and provide a challenging 
curriculum for all and to continue to expand students' skills at their readiness level, 
MARS-Math and Reading Seminars were started in sixth grade. Many of our teachers 



132 



were trained in Project Read, a powerful comprehension program. Supplemental texts 
were purchased to provide appropriate challenge for all learners. In math, students now 
have seven periods of math per week, allowing for additional time to review and reteach 
and/or to extend and stretch. In addition, a period of math and writing has been added to 
grade seven to target students' skills and move all learners ahead. A newly restructured 
developmental reading program has been designed for both grade seven and eight. In 
conjunction with these new curricular offerings, we wrote and received a MCAS grant 
from the state. We used these funds to create a summer Math Academy for incoming 
sixth graders to help improve their skills and to ease the transition to the middle school. 
In addition, we ran a winter Math Academy for those students who needed additional 
skill work on the seventh and eighth grade math standards. These programs have been 
highly successful, but only because of the inschool-professional development time that 
was begun last year. Teachers meet in the content grade level groups to identify content 
and design and develop activities and assessments that support these differentiated 
programs. Very powerful learning experiences have resulted from this restructuring of 
teacher collaboration. 

Student successes support that many of our efforts have been very successful. In our fifth 
year of MCAS testing, the district placed sixth and the middle school placed first in ELA 
and fifth in math. The State Performance Ratings found Blake to be On Target in all areas 
as we continue to help all students become proficient or above in math and ELA. Out of 
728 students, 337 were academically recognized at the end of first term for achieving all 
Bs or better on their first report card for the 2002-2003 school year. Ninety-two students 
qualified for the Johns Hopkins Talent Search based on either standardized math or 
reading scores and took the SATs as middle school students. ShiShi Chen, as a Blake 
seventh grader, scored the highest of all John Hopkins candidates from Massachusetts. 
Our annual National Geography Bee brought out the real world knowledge of Frank 
Perry who represented Blake at the State level. Our reading program, now in its fifth year, 
recognized the most students ever for the volume of books read. Thirty-three students 
read at least 35 books over the summer while an additional 104 read over 15 books. For 
the second year, we sent a Quiz Bowl team to the Xavarian Quiz Bowl placing fifth out of 
seventeen schools. Seven teams represented Blake at the Destination Imagination District 
Competition. Two teams won first place and went on to the State tournament. Our Math 
Olympiad Team received the "Highest Team Achievement", placing in the top 10% of 
all of the teams in the international competition. 

Inter-scholastic sports, intramurals, field trips and speakers help assure that all students 
have a rich middle school experience. Our inter-scholastic teams in football, field hockey, 
girls and boys basketball, baseball, softball and track all had a successful season. Our 
intramural program expanded even more this past year adding dodgeball, school 
newspaper, writing skills, Age of Conquerors and a seventh grade homework club. Field 
trips enrich and extend all content areas. Eighth graders traveled to Salem to complement 



133 



the study of Miller's Crucible; Lowell to better understand the beginning of the industrial 
revolution; and Boston to see a series of short stories interpreted on stage. The year 
culminated for the eighth graders with a four-day trip to New York City and Philadelphia. 
Seventh graders saw the stage production of Dickens' classic, The Christmas Carol and 
walk the streets of Johnny Tremain 's Boston. The culminating trip is the three-day stay at 
nature's Classroom in western Massachusetts. Our sixth graders walked the geology at 
Moose Hill and explored the ecological diversity of George's Island. Speakers are used in 
many ways to bring curriculum alive and to promote community beliefs. Mark Brown, an 
Emmy nominated presenter, shared the powerful message that Words Count as we 
recognized Martin Luther King and his fight to end prejudice and bigotry. Our Memorial 
Day Celebration featured Sergeant Daniel Clarke and his patriotic musical review of 
American history and recognition of area veterans. 

The aftermath of September 1 1 th impacted much of what we did throughout this past year. 
Our annual eighth grade trip to Washington was redesigned and we visited Philadelphia 
and New York City. We increased our awareness of the world around us by adding two 
related courses to the seventh grade- News today and Problem Solving. In addition, 
geography and current events have taken on a greater emphasis in all grades. On the first 
anniversary of 9/11, we came together as a community and took time not only to honor 
those who had died a year ago but also those who give of themselves every day to keep us 
safe. Each student wrote a name of someone who was killed in the tragedy one year ago 
and these were hung on three panels of construction fence. When all ribbons were 
assembled, a proud American flag emerged. It still reminds us every day of how 
important every minute is each day. All firefighters, police officers and EMTS were then 
gathered in the front of the school and presented with certificates of appreciation. In 
addition, students and staff who had volunteered to make a difference were recognized. 
We also chose community service as a theme for our upcoming year and will continue to 
recognize those who give of themselves to help others. In October, forty students and 
staff attended the dedication of the Lenny Zakim-Bunker Hill Bridge and pledged to work 
to stop bigotry and embrace diversity. This fall students walked in the Making Strides 
Against Breast Cancer Walk, supported 38 children in the Christmas in the City program, 
and hosted a holiday dinner for the senior citizens at Tilden Village. Our first SIPS- 
Students Involved in Public Service- Day will be in January 2003, and we hope this 
seminar focus will expand both our knowledge and our actions of community service. 

As we move into 2003, our efforts will remain much the same as 2002. Construction 
issues will increase and the need to protect our programs and learning environment along 
side the need for expanded space will challenge us all. We also will have the additional 
burden of dealing with a very tight if not drastically reduced budget while balancing the 
need for continued quality programs to meet the diverse needs of our learners. Staff will 
continue to need time and resources to refine our practices and the school as a whole will 
need to develop ways to keep us together as a community as spaces are divided by 



134 



construction. It promises to be a very challenging year, but I know with the highly 
professional and dedicated staff, the willing and responsible young learners and the 
supportive and caring parents we will continue to be a vibrant, learning community. It is 
an honor to work with the Blake staff, students and parents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Mongiello 
Principal 




135 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal for the Dale Street School for the 2002 to 2003 school year, I am delighted 
to submit this report for the year ending December 31, 2002. 

Enrollment 

The enrollment at Dale Street School on October 1 , 2002 was 25 1 students in grade four 
and 231 students in grade five for a total of 482 students. The average class size was 22 
students per class. 

Instructional Highlights and Achievements 

The major instructional focus this year continued to be the curriculum mapping initiative 
underway in the school district. The mapping focus this year has moved to the 
disciplines of Science and Social Studies. The goal of the curriculum mapping initiative 
is to align the school's Science and Social Studies curriculum with Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. 

As part of the District's plan to support students who might be at risk of failing MCAS 
tests, Dale Street School developed and implemented a plan for MCAS Remediation 
Academies. Individual MCAS Student Success Plans were developed for students who 
met specific criteria and extra instruction was provided in small groups either before or 
after school. These MCAS Academies provided remedial support to students in the areas 
of English/Language Arts and Mathematics. 

Dale Street School teachers also explored ways to provide differentiated instructional 
activities for students in their classes. The teachers worked with a consultant to help 
them plan lessons and activities that will both challenge and meet the needs of all 
students in their classrooms. The area of focus this year for differentiated activities has 
been mathematics. This will be an ongoing focus over the next couple of years at the 
school. 

Some of the highlights in the area of technology include: 

• Web-Page development workshops for teachers. 

• Training in the Classworks Gold Math Program for MCAS 
Academy teachers. 

• Tom Snyder software training for teachers. 

• The purchase through a grant of thirty Alphasmarts with 
keyboarding programs to support whole class activities. 






136 



Dale Street School also developed a comprehensive "Safety Plan". The focus of this 
year's plan was to insure accountability in either a building lockdown situation or 
building evacuation procedure. The plan was reviewed with teachers at the start of the 
school year. Using their feedback, revisions were made then shared with students. Drills 
were held periodically throughout the school year. This will continue to be an ongoing 
goal for the school over the next couple of years. 

In response to the events of September 11, 2001, Dale Street students and teachers 
assembled a "Peace Quilt". Everyone in the school had an opportunity to create their 
own patch on the quilt. The quilt remained on display in the school for thirty days and a 
school-wide assembly was held when the quilt was taken down. 

Students continued their participation in a number of enrichment activities. As part of the 
unit of study on oceans, grade four students visited the New England Aquarium for a 
water study of the Boston Harbor. Both grades enjoyed a performance of Tuck 
Everlasting at the Wheelock Family Theatre. The fourth grade was visited by High 
Touch-High Tech, a hands-on science lab entitled The Power of Light. Fifth grade 
students attended a performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, attended a 
production entitled Dance Asia at the Berklee Auditorium, and visited the Museum of 
Science. School-wide enrichment included the continuation of our Intramural Program, 
the Character Education Program, the National Geography Bee and performances that 
featured the Magic ofLyn, Roots of American Music, Pyramids and Pharaohs, World of 
Snakes, and Scot Cannon. Monthly school-wide assemblies touched on the themes of 
bus safety, world hunger, school spirit, and Earth Day. 

Staff In-service Training 

Staff Recognition 

Teachers, Bethany Sager, Sue Woodman, and Pauline Carey were honored for their hard 
work in developing our Character Education Program. They were the recipients of the 
Goldin Foundation Award for Excellence in Education. 

Public/Parental Involvement 

Throughout the school year, the Dale Street School Council and the Community School 
Association (CSA) have continued to provide opportunities for parental involvement with 
the goal of strengthening the tie between home and school. The continuation of our 
community service program The Beacon Program continues to be a highlight of the 
parents' efforts. The Beacon Program provides students opportunities to serve the 
community as volunteers at the Public Library, Rocky Woods, Animal Shelter, Park and 
Recreation Department, Tilden Village, and the Fire Department. 



137 



The CSA provided Dale Street School with funding for a three-week author's residency, 
sponsored the Create-A-Craft Fair and Kids Night Out, raised funds through Box Tops 
for Education, SCRIP, and the sale of Yankee Candles and provided our volunteer force 
in the classrooms and Library Media Center. Parents were invited to attend an evening 
presentation entitled Talking to Children about Traumatic Events. 

The School Council continues to support the development of school goals and to annually 
review the curriculum guides, Student/Parent Handbook, and Parent Information Night. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard L. DeYoung 
Principal 



138 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Please accept this report regarding the educational programs and co-curricular activities 
of the Ralph Wheelock School for the year ending December 31, 2002. This is my fifth 
annual report for the Town of Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Wheelock School's enrollment, as of October 1, 2002, is 491 students: 247 from 
grade two and 244 from grade three. In addition, we have one Project ACCEPT class and 
one TEC Collaborative class housed within our school, having a total of 10 students 
enrolled. The school currently houses twelve sections of grade two and eleven sections 
of grade three. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Wheelock students participated in a variety of Community Service endeavors. These 
included a CSA sponsored penny drive to support the Council on Aging; the donation of 
hundreds of cans of food to support the Medfield Food Pantry (as an activity that 
supported our assembly on Giving, Caring and Sharing); and participation in the Barnes 
and Noble Book Drive to benefit needy families in Metro West Boston. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Wheelock faculty and staff continue to participate in many professional development 
activities that take the form of workshops, graduate level courses, lectures and attendance 
at meetings, conventions and symposia on a wide range of education related topics. 

Mapping our curriculum and instituting lessons and strategies that differentiate 

instruction for students of varying abilities, interests and learning styles continues as an 
ongoing town-wide goal, of which Wheelock is an active partner. The continued use of 
Essential Questions in all curriculum areas has also enhanced learning amongst our 
second and third grade students. 

Our school's web page http://medfield.net/ is up and running and is being constantly 
updated to reflect current curriculum projects, special events and to facilitate 
communication between our school and the families of our students. 



139 



PUBLIC/PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 

As always, parents take an active role at Wheelock, supporting curriculum initiatives 
such as our annual Pilgrim Feast, and field trips to Plimoth Plantation, the Boston 
Museum of Science, the Worcester Ecotarium and to study Medfield (second grade); and 
Boston, (third grade). Community participation is also appreciated, and once again, the 
Girl Scouts helped out at our Feast by tending the cooking fires and demonstrating 
authentic colonial cooking techniques. The Medfield Coalition has once again supported 
several Wheelock programs including materials to facilitate geography instruction and 
mapping skills; two professional development opportunities for our staff including the 
Project Read Phonology course and a seminar in the development of assessments for 
student reading and writing. In addition to supporting these endeavors, the Coalition 
funded the creation of a permanent exhibit of a mural created by students in Mr. Kuehl's 
class, depicting human forms and geometrical shapes, which is proudly located in our 
first grade corridor. 

Wheelock School was proud to be the site of the gubernatorial election this past fall. The 
elections have been permanently moved to Wheelock, and we are glad to be part of 
democracy in action. Many of our classes were able to visit the polls and learn about the 
voting process first hand. Thanks are due to Town Clerk Carol Mayer and the town's 
election officials who helped make this experience so rewarding for our students. 

WHEELOCK LIBRARY FUND 

The Ralph Wheelock School has received many generous donations in loving memory of 
Natasha Domeshek. The fund will be used to purchase books and to help sponsor a 
Literacy Week to be held in the spring of 2003. Natasha, a student in Mrs. Dunlea's third 
grade class, loved reading and books, and a special bookplate, designed to honor her 
memory, will be affixed to books purchased through this fund. 

FUTURE TRENDS / PRIORITIES 

We have now completed two years of student assemblies, and they are now a regular part 
of life at Wheelock. Each focuses on a different theme, all related to our school wide 
emphasis on Social Competency. Students take an active part in each assembly which is 
planned by our Wheelock staff members. 

We continue to benefit from the support we receive from high school students and from 
senior citizens who both volunteer to work in our classrooms. The high school teacher 
aides and the senior volunteers work with small groups or individual children in reading 
and writing groups or in other ways that support academic growth. 

Our physical plant, thanks to the efforts of our fine custodial crew, continues to be in 
good shape. A third handicapped space was added to our parking lot over the summer, 



140 



and safety walkways were painted to facilitate parent pickups from our small gym. 
Working with parent groups and the police, we redesigned our dismissal procedures 
which now allow for greater security and for a smoother traffic flow. Improved signage 
and the installation of improved sidewalks have facilitated these changes. The CSA has 
continued its multi-stage playground upgrade and new surfacing material was again 
added in 2002. 

The Medfield Afterschool Program's modular classroom was moved to the Wheelock site 
during the summer. This enables MAP to house its K-l program here at Wheelock. 

We have replaced our older Apple computer lab with eight new iMac computers, thanks 
to a generous gift from the Wheelock CSA. Our new lab is now wireless, networked and 
has full Internet capability. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alan Pullman 
Principal 




141 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Memorial School, I respectfully submit my annual report for the 
school year ending December 31, 2002. This is my second annual report for the Town of 
Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Memorial School services students in our Integrated Preschool, kindergarten and 
grade one programs. Memorial's enrollment, as of October 1, 2002, totals five hundred 
eight students. This number represents forty preschoolers enrolled in morning or 
afternoon sessions, two hundred six kindergarten students attending in morning or 
afternoon sessions and two hundred sixty-two grade one students. 

We currently have ten sections of kindergarten and twelve grade one classes. The average 
class size for kindergarten is twenty students. The first grade average class size is 
twenty-two students. 

Our staff has increased with the addition of one new grade one teacher, in response to a 
child rearing leave, and a half time reading support aide. We have added two modular 
classrooms to provide space for two grade one classes during the building project. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Memorial School staff continually strives to expand the learning opportunities 
provided to our students. To achieve this goal teachers have participated in a variety of 
activities and coursework offered by the school system, as well as outside workshops and 
institutes of higher learning. To maintain the national accreditation awarded in 2000 by 
the National Association for the Education of Young Children, our preschool staff must 
continually monitor, evaluate and review their practices in providing a developmentally 
appropriate program for three and four year old children, both with and without special 
needs. 

Summer curriculum development resulted in the formulation of a number of worthwhile 
projects. Grade one teacher groups updated our "Curriculum Highlights" document that is 
distributed each fall to parents to reflect the Massachusetts State Frameworks as well as 
new practices that have been instituted at the first grade level. In addition this group 
developed a mathematics curriculum grid to clearly represent curriculum expectations as 
well as state framework strands. Social studies timelines were constructed, laminated and 
displayed in all grade one classes to provide a visual representation of the events and 
people studied by our young students. Kindergarten staff worked to develop a 
Mathematics Home Connection to allow parents to further develop the concepts that are 



142 



introduced at that level. A group of kindergarten teachers, grade one teachers and 
support staff participated in a summer and fall workshop on Phonemic Awareness. This 
area of pre-reading content is one in which many of our staff had no formal training. 
Literacy is the major emphasis of our early childhood program and as such we have been 
busy leveling our books to provide our students with reading material at each of their 
correct instructional levels. Continuation of the district wide initiative of curriculum 
mapping and differentiated instruction has guided us through this process to meet the 
needs of all learners in our classrooms. In addition, with the support of a weekly math 
consultant teachers are devising and sharing differentiated lessons in math. 

'Teachers teaching teachers" continues to be a valuable source of professional 
development for Memorial staff. Staff have been supportive in helping each other to learn 
a system of evaluating student ability in reading called the Developmental Reading 
Assessment. Touch Math, a strategy to help students with basic math concepts has also 
been modeled and supported by staff members. SWAT(System Wide Assistive 
Technology) funded by the Medfield Coalition and CSA allowed staff members to teach 
new technology supported strategies and programs to our staff. Our Social Competency 
Program continues to be a major initiative at Memorial as we continue to train new staff 
members to insure consistency in the manner through which we help develop socially 
competent behavior in our students. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Our School Council developed the 2002-2003 School Improvement Plan and presented it 
to the school committee in June 2002. In response to the goals of that document we have 
incorporated the school council and building project committee into one group. 
Continued effort is focused on reviewing and rewriting our curriculum highlights 
brochures distributed to parents each year. Training has taken place in the areas of 
phonemic awareness and other early literacy foundation skills. Finally, we have reviewed 
and modified our safety and evacuation procedures to reflect changes necessitated by the 
Memorial building project. 

The Memorial School Community School Association (CSA) continues to make 
significant contributions to the school through both financial support and volunteerism. 
Among their contributions have been the funding of the license of our webpage site and 
granting the funding of various teacher requests. The CSA and contributions from the 
Medfield Coalition have provided our students a Performing Arts Series. Through this 
endeavor our students have enjoyed presentations throughout the year. Included in these 
interesting performances have been Johnny Appleseed, Johnny the K, Dinosaurs & 
Fossils, Theater to Do, Explore the Ocean World, Food Play, and Mother Goose. The 
children and staff at Memorial are most appreciative of these programs which add so 
much to the cultural experience of our students. A committee of kindergarten parents is 
working to supplement the science curriculum by providing hands-on science inquiry 
experiences to each of our kindergarten classes. Literacy events in the form of visiting 



143 



authors come to us through the efforts of the CSA. We are most fortunate to have many 
other dedicated parents support the Memorial School, its staff and students with time 
spent in classrooms, collating Thursday packets and volunteering in our cafeteria and 
library. 

The Medfield Coalition for Public Education has continued to support Memorial staff 
endeavors through their generous grants. This group funded a grant for our music 
instructor to provide a number of developmentally appropriate musical instruments to 
support our program. Reading materials to support the "Letter People" were purchased 
for our kindergarten literacy program. Our library was fortunate to receive money to 
purchase books for parents and our young children to explain life experiences such as 
dealing with the death of a loved one and the grieving process which follows. Two 
teachers were sent to a conference on learning and also purchased materials to help them 
to initiate strategies learned at that time. We continue to encourage high school students 
interested in education careers to work in our classrooms. This year we are again 
enjoying four volunteers as part of our program. There are also senior citizens that 
continue to contribute by volunteering in our classrooms as well as serving in our newly 
created position as greeters at our front entrance sign-in desk. 

FUTURE TRENDS 

Emphasis on developing literacy in all areas of the curriculum will continue through the 
efforts of this most dedicated and professional staff. We will continue to focus on 
technology and ways to improve Memorial School's website. Differentiation of 
instruction as well as Curriculum Mapping will continue to support the teaching and 
learning process. 

At this point we are well into the first phase of the Memorial School building project. 
We are most fortunate that there have been no interruptions to our program and anticipate 
moving into the new kindergarten/preschool wing in time for the beginning of the 2003- 
2004 school year. The remaining two phases will involve the moving of classes and 
services as did phase one, with the staff and Memorial council ready to manage these 
changes in a manner which will allow Memorial to maintain and provide a strong 
educational experience for all students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Barbara Levine 
Principal 




144 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit my Pupil Services Department report for the year ending December 31, 
2002. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

There has been an increase in the special education student enrollment reflecting the 
overall increase of students in the community. 

Students Dec. 1, 2001 Dec. 1, 2002 

ages 3-5 49 46 

ages 6-17 277 309 

ages 1 8-2 1 15 18 

341 373 

Most of our children receive their services within our school system as indicated below: 

SPECIAL EDUCATION FIGURES ONLY DECEMBER 1 , 2002 

Grades K-5 133 

Grades 6-8 91 

Grades 9-12 84 

Collaborative Placements 1 

Private Day 1 2 

Private Residential 3 

A major change in the Massachusetts Special Education Regulations requires school 
teams to determine the type of disability of children in need of special education. To 
meet the requirement the staff has participated in training in the use of the most up-to- 
date evaluation tools and in many disability awareness and methodology workshops. 

PRESCHOOL SERVICES/PROGRAMS 

We continue to operate four, half-day early childhood programs at Memorial School. We 
have 19 four-year-old and 20, three-year-old children who are enrolled in our integrated 
preschool programs. These programs are supported by tuitions and grant funding. 

The Integrated Preschool teachers continue to participate as members of the Charles 
River Community Partnership Council. This year the major focus of the council is to 
support programs in acquiring Accreditation from the National Association for the 



145 



education of Young Children. We are pleased to announce that our preschool program is 
accredited by NAEYC. 

GUIDANCE SERVICES 

The guidance program at Medfield High School provides enrichment for the whole 
student. Four counselors help students make a smooth transition into high school, and aid 
them in fulfilling their emotional, academic and social needs. This year the guidance 
curriculum was redesigned and each counselor assumed responsibility for the curriculum 
of one grade level. The curriculum focus in each grade is: High School Life and Study 
Skills in ninth, Career Exploration in tenth, Future Planning in eleventh and Applications 
in twelfth. With this structure in place and with increased communication between the 
middle and high schools, the guidance department continues to improve its services to 
students and families. 

Guidance at the Middle School is an integral part of the support system that helps all 
children achieve academic success, healthy self-esteem, sensitivity to the needs of 
others and the ability to cope with change. Through Group Guidance classes, 
individual counseling and professional interaction with colleagues and parents, the two 
guidance counselors foster students' personal growth and help them build on their 
strengths and interests. At each grade level, a developmentally designed curriculum 
provides for students' exposure to topics that are age appropriate. Guidance updates in 
the Blake Newsletter provide important information to parents and students on 
educational and social issues. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Five full-time nurses provide services to children in the school system. The nurses are 
both caring and conscientious in providing services and maintaining a healthy school 
environment. 

The diverse role of the school nurse includes: care for children with medical special 
needs, participation at special education team meetings, conducting home visits as 
recommended by the school planning team, education on health issues for students, staff, 
and parents as well as performing state mandated screenings and monitoring state 
requirements such as physical examinations and immunizations. 

We have been fortunate once again this year to have been recipients of several donations 
and grants for equipment, supplies and professional development. These donations have 
enhanced our health rooms and improved the services that we offer our students. 

Postural screening for scoliosis is conducted yearly for grades 5 through 9. The physical 



146 



education instructors do the first examination, referring any rechecks and follow-up to the 
nurse. Grade 7 students are examined by their health care providers during the year as 
part of the required physical exam. 

Two hundred forty-seven youngsters were screened for kindergarten last year with the 
assistance of school personnel, trained volunteers, the Lions Club and Dr. Stewart 
Galeucia. Additional volunteers also assisted our nurses in completing vision and hearing 
screening students in preschool through grade 9. As always, we are very grateful for this 
assistance, without which we would be unable to conduct so many screenings in a timely 
way. 

PERSONNEL 

Three of our long-time members of the Pupil Services Department retired this year. 
After 36 year of devoted service, Mr. Martin Salka, a guidance counselor at the High 
School, retired; and after 21 years of dedicated service caring for all our children, the 
school nurse at the Memorial School, Lois Cardell retired. Lastly, having provided 27 
years of special education services at the Wheelock School, Ms. Virginia Sullivan 
decided to retire. Mr. Erik Ormberg has transferred to the High School from the 
Middle School guidance department to replace Mr. Salka. Ms. Nancy Telia was hired 
to fill Mrs. Cardell's position at Memorial. Ms. Molly O'Connor has filled Ms 
Sullivan's position as special educator at Wheelock School. 

Other personnel changes include Mr. Matthew Marenghi as a guidance counselor at the 
Middle School, Ms. Susan Johnson as a High School special education teacher, and 
Ms. Trinka Snyder as a High School psychologist. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen McArdle 
Director of Pupil Services 




147 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my annual report as the athletic director for the Medfield Public 
Schools for the year ending December 31, 2002. 

It is my pleasure to report that for the eighth year in a row over seventy-five percent of 
the student body participated in athletics. This statistic reaffirms the integral part 
athletics play in our school and the education of our children. 

My goal will be to continue to emphasize the tradition of sportsmanship, which has been 
our history here in Medfield. Fair play, competition, goal setting and team work, are just 
a few of the life lessons that athletics can teach. Athletics truly is the other half of 
education. 

We offer 26 varsity interscholastic sports to our students. We added one varsity sport this 
year, girls varsity gymnastics. This year we won five Tri Valley League Championships, 
and 60% of all our contests. This was the best winning percentage in the league. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three levels during the past year. The 
following is the entire athletic coaching staff by season: 

WINTER 



Basketball (Boys) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Herb Grace 
Michael Mason 
Ben Vessa 



Basketball (Girls) 



Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



John Dunn 
Meredith Miller 
Ann M. Sabra 
Blake Sabra 



Cheering 
Ice Hockey 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Georganne Gerlach 

John Panciocco 
John Bannister 
Doug Kay 



Indoor Track (Boys) 
Indoor Track (Girls) 



Nicholas Stevens 
Bernie Shea (Assist.) 
Brian Frazier 



148 



Gymnastics 


Varsity 


Michelle Hopping 




Assistant 


Bill Matyskiel 


Swimming 


Varsity 


Carol Bauer 




Assistant 


Jennifer Hornsby 




SPRING 




Baseball 


Varsity 


Richard Nickerson 
Mark Nickerson 




Junior Varsity 


Martin Salka 




Freshman 


Ben Vessa 


Softball 


Varsity 


Johanna Madge 




Junior Varsity 


Erik Ormberg 


Tennis (Boys) 


Varsity 


Vincent Joseph 


Tennis (Girls) 


Varsity 


Ross Irwin 


Tennis 


Junior Varsity Coed 


Blake Sabra 


Track and Field (Boys) 


Varsity 


Michael Kraemer 
Brian Frazier( Assist.) 


Track and Field (Girls) 


Varsity 


Michael Slason 
Bernie Shea (Assist.) 
Carol Bauer 


Volleyball (Boys) 


Varsity 


John Hastings 


Lacrosse (Boys) 


Varsity 


Robert Aronson 




Junior Varsity 


Michael Douglas 


Lacrosse (Girls) 


Varsity 


Kristen Supko 




Junior Varsity 


Veronica Boyle 



149 



Cheering 



FALL 



Georganne Gerlach 



Golf 



Varsity 



George Callahan 



Cross Country 



Varsity 



Michael Kraemer 
Bemie Shea (Assist.) 
Carol Bauer (Assist.) 



Field Hockey 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Robin Shean 
Veronica Boyle 



Football 



Varsity 



Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Vincent Joseph 
Mike Slason (Assist.) 
Erik Onnberg (Assist) 
Steve Ryan 
Ian Gagne 



Soccer (Boys) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Tucker Reynolds 
Travis Taliaferro 
Jason Heim 



Soccer (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Junior Varsity II 



Kristen Smith 
Phil Stameris 
Paul Coutinho 



Volleyball (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Junior Varsity II 



John Hastings 
Sarah Buckley 
Jennifer DiGiovanni 



All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri-Valley League, which consists of 
Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Millis, 
Norton and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fourth in the TVL in total 
enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The league is highly competitive in all sports, 
boys and girls. Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state tournament 
play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 2001-2002. The girls basketball 
team had a 16-5 regular season record, good for third place in the league. The girls 
qualified for state tournament play for the thirteenth year in a row. Megan Robinson was 
voted MVP of the league. Our boys team finished their season with a 9-1 1 record. They 



150 



missed qualifying for the state tourney for the first time in ten years. Girls indoor track 
was third in the TVL, with a 3-2 record. Our boys indoor track team was 5-0, and won 
the league title. The ice hockey team record was 15-4-1, and won the league 
championship for the third year in a row. The hockey team lost in the semi-finals of the 
state tournament. Our girls swim team was 6-2 on the season, and came in second in the 
south sectionals. The boys swim team was 3-7 in a very competitive league. Our first 
year of girls gymnastics was very successful. The team finished 9-3, and Val Matyskiel 
was the state champion in the vault. 

The spring of 2002 was another successful season for our Warriors. Softball had a 13-5 
record, good for second place in the league. Our baseball team finished 10-10 this year. 
Included in our 10 wins was the 200 th victory for Coach Dick Nickerson who has been 
with our baseball team for 15 years. Our girls tennis team was 12-2, good for second 
place in the league. The boys tennis team finished 11-4, good for second place in the 
league. The team qualified for tournament play for the twelfth consecutive year. Boys 
track finished the season undefeated 8-0, and won the league. They also were selected as 
the most sportsman-like team in the league. Our girls track team finished 7-1, finishing 
second in the TVL. Our third year boys varsity lacrosse team had a remarkable season 
they finished with a 1 1-5 record and won the league for the second year in a row. Andy 
Pepin was named defensive player of the year. The girls lacrosse team had a tremendous 
season finishing 11-6-1, and qualified for the state tournament for the second year in a 
row. 

Fall 2002 was very exciting for our Warrior teams. Girls volleyball was second in the 
TVL with a 17-3 mark. Krista Suojanen was selected as a Globe and Herald All 
Scholastic All Star and Krista was selected as the player of the year in Division 3 in the 
state. The girls were division 3 central champions. The football team finished 8-3. This 
is the most victories in one season for any Warrior football team. David Meaney was the 
MVP of the Thanksgiving Day game against Dover Sherborn. The highlight of the year 
was defeating Westwood for the first time in 29 years. This game became known as the 
Mud Bowl, because it was played in a downpour. Field hockey had their best season 
ever, winning their first league title and going undefeated in regular season play. Whitney 
Shean was voted to the Globe and Herald All Scholastic all star team, and was league 
MVP. Coach Robin Shean was voted coach of the year in division 2 in the state. Boys 
soccer qualified for the tourney again this year with an 8-5-6 record. Our girls soccer 
program had a great season, and finished 12-5-1, they were second in the league. The 
girls were State South Finalists. Both our boys and girls cross-country teams had 
outstanding seasons. The boys finished 6-1, and the girls record was 4-2. Robin Bauer 
was a Globe and Herald All Scholastic All Star, and Robin was the MVP of the league. 
Our golf team had an 11-5 record for the season, and qualified for the state tournament. 

The annual All Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield Boosters, was held in early 
June at the Glen Ellen Country Club in Millis. An audience of over 600 student athletes, 
coaches and parents were treated to a very special evening including the sixth annual 



151 



Thomas Reis Sportsmanship Award, which was presented this year to Jim McCloud and 
Kristen Moss. At the banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Amy 
Bauer, and Jordan Calaguire were named the 2001-2002 Scholar Athlete recipients. 
Medfield High School's "Wall of Fame" inductees were Nancy Gronberg Kelley, Class 
of 1950; Mark Brayton, Class of 1975; and Dan Powers, Class of 1984. 

At the June graduation exercises, Matt Arnold, and Meghan Ingram were named 
recipients of the School Boosters Spirit Award. First Team Tri-Valley League All-Star 
selections for 2001-2002 are as follows: 



Boys Basketball 
Girls Basketball 

Ice Hockey 

Boys Indoor Track 

Girls Indoor Track 

Swimming 

Gymnastics 
Baseball 
Softball 
Girls Tennis 

Boys Tennis 



Casey Hatten 

Megan Robinson 
Jill Anelauskas 

Connor Lennon 
Rob Lynch 

Justin Biedrycki 
Brett Vollmuth 

Krista Suojanen 
Steph Agriminakis 

Amy Bauer 
Kaitlin Anelauskis 

Valerie Matyskiel 

Jim McCloud 

Diana Koch 

Katherine Cianfrocca 
Jenny Rodenhouse 

Greg Zaia 



Jim McCloud 



Kyle Bushong 



Pandi Sullivan 
Kristen Moss 

Robin Bauer 



Matt Villone 

Ali Catenacci 

Nicole Eby 
Caitlin Walsh 

Peter O'Brien 



152 



Boys Track 



Girls Track 



Boys Volleyball 
Boys Lacrosse 

Golf 
Cross Country 



Field Hockey 

Boys Soccer 
Girls Soccer 
Football 

Volleyball (Girls) 



Kyle Bushong 
Andrew Bowling 
Justin Biedrzycki 
Jared Marshall 
Brendan Merrill 



Tom Woods 
Casey Hatten 
Obi Aduba 
Chris Hubbard 



Krista Suojanen Kristen Moss 

Christie Majkut Robin Bauer 

Erin Fitzgerald Kate Goltz 

Steph Agrimanakas Pandi Sullivan 



Alex Leong 

Brett Vollmulth 
Bill Steinkrauss 



Andy Pepin 
Brendan Lynch 



Steve Neidermire Kevin Kristof 



Nick Sullivan 
Matt Muir 
Kaitlin Anelauskas 
Matt Tuths 

Whitney Shean 
Katherine Moon 

Evan Trowbridge 

Ali Grant 

Dave Meaney 
Neil Kingsbury 
Kevin Gavaghan 

Kristen Holborn 
Lauren Seghezzi 



Jared Marshall 
Tom Woods 
Robin Bauer 
Julie Zaia 

Jess Egan 



Andrew Pepin 



Brendan Lynch 
Kevin Hall 



Lyndsay Church 
Krista Suojanen 



153 



Our cheering teams under the guidance of Georganne Gerlach were, as always, talented 
and creative. Our cheerleaders contribute to the athletic program's success by providing 
leadership, support and much enthusiasm to our teams, spectators and community. Year 
after year, their cheering and dance routines are without equal in the Tri-Valley League. 
The annual Homecoming Pep Rally organized by the fall cheering team was once again 
spectacular! Our Thanksgiving game rally, and bon fire was a big success. This was 
followed by our Alumni Touch Football Tournament. 

This concludes my annual report as the Director of Athletics. On behalf of all the 
Warriors, I would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, the Medfield 
School Boosters and the community for all of their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Jon Kirby 

Director of Athletics 




jfeBsra&s** 



154 



Report of the Medfield Community Education Program 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The Medfield Community Education Program, under the direction of Mr. Richard 
DeYoung, is comprised of an Adult Education Program, an after-school Intramural 
Program at Blake Middle School and Dale Street School, and a Summer Enrichment 
Program. 

The Adult Education Program offers workshops on financial planning as well as courses 
in painting, technology, and photography. Sports and wellness activities such as 
basketball for both men and women, and weight training and fitness continue to be very 
popular. An SAT Preparation course is offered in the fall and spring to high school 
students as well as five sessions of Drivers Education. 

The Blake Middle School Intramural Program, under the direction of Mr. Nat Vaughn, 
offers programs to sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students in both the fall and the 
spring. This year's offerings included cross-country, oil painting, homework club, and 
golf 

The Dale Street School Intramural Program, under the direction of Mrs. Heidi Crable, 
offers programs to fourth and fifth grade students in both the fall and spring. The 
offerings included rocket making, French and Spanish, basketball, flag football, and arts 
and crafts. 

As I conclude my sixth year as the Director of Community Education in Medfield, I 
would like to recognize the efforts of Mrs. Crable and Mr. Vaughn, the directors of the 
school intramural programs, and Mrs. O'Brien, the director of the Summer Experience 
program. Each director has worked very hard to insure that quality activities are in place 
for the students who take part in their programs. I continue to look forward to expanding 
the offerings in our entire program. If there is interest in having a course offered in a 
particular area, or if you know of someone who is interested in offering a course through 
the Adult Education Program, please call me at (508) 359-1415. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard L. DeYoung 
Director 



155 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2002 



MARRIAGES 2002 



FEBRUARY 

2/3 Frederick Thomas Baird 
Susan Marion Miller 

2/ 1 6 William George Hasapidis 
Jeannette Lynne Grondin 

MARCH 

3/17 NabilJalal 

Allison Marie Paine 

APRIL 

Richard Paul DeSorgher 
Julie Romaine Edwards 
Michael Andrew O'Connor 
Jill Harding DiSabato 
Adam Henry Witham 
Nikki Winston 
Haig Charles Mardirosian 
Susan Elizabeth Partridge 

MAY 

Matthew Christopher Lomax 
Heather Joy Morin 
Jason Paul Berry 
Danielle Corsiglia 
Eric James Kallio 
Michelle Marie Kilgallen 
Douglas Robert Rutherford 
Jennifer N. MacKessy 

JUNE 

Todd Christopher Giessler 
Jennifer Lyn Buckley 
John Anthony Guglielmi 
Teresa O'Brien 
Christopher Thomas O'Neil 
Anne Luciano 
Daniels Hamant 
Deborah Ellen Howie 
Christopher Edward Velzis 
Melissa Anne Sawyer 
Matthew John Nasuti 
Jennifer Lynn Phillips 



6/29 John W Jarvis 

Catherine Ann DeAngelis 

JULY 

7/13 Paul Douglas McKechnie, Jr 
Tara Susan Almeida 

7/28 Philip James Bun- 
June M Doucette 

AUGUST 

8/2 Shawn Michael Byrne 

Sarah Elizabeth Pronovost 
8/3 Gregory Edward Pollard 

Susan Ann Swieck 
8/3 Darrick W Ferguson 

Amy Jung-Sook Ambrosini 
8/3 Nikhil Vithal Jathar 

Sangeeta Welankiwar 
8/3 Gary John Makuch 

Patricia M Dempsey 
8/4 Sean Thomas Evers 

Tara Louise Home 
8/10 Jeffrey Alan Maloney 

JoDee Ann McCarthy 
8/17 Paul Henri Lahaise 

Paige Alain Johnson 
8/1 7 Richard Albert Dennis 

Patricia A Leahy 
8/17 Eddie Dean Griswold 

Sharon Ann Ravida 
8/23 Walter Mark Mulock II 

Ellyn Marie Jacobs 
8/24 John Gerald Chambers, Jr 

Deborah Joan Silvestrone 

SEPTEMBER 

9/1 Joseph A Crump 

Elizabeth Ann Bartony 
9/1 Marc Martin Goldman 

Margaret Jane Maider 
9/14 James Everett Dewar 

Elizabeth Jaye Lanagan 
9/2 1 Randy Anthony Newsome 

Michelle Diana Weston 



157 



9/28 David Thomas Reilly 
Jessica Miller Thornton 

OCTOBER 

10/5 Brian Edmund Addesa 

Sara Elizabeth Mastronardi 



158 



DEATH 2002 






JANUARY 




JULY 


/6 John Julien Meuse 


7/1 


Aurora Maria Flaherty 


/8 Barry A Tray 


7/8 


Dorothy Marie Feigenbaum 


19 Milos Vladimir Konopasek 


7/9 


Winthrop D Day 


19 Maria Anne Fuller 


7/16 


Julia Louise Hand 


/14 Earl W Shaw Jr 


7/20 


Frances Kopetz 


/15 Alice Carreiro Borges 






/29 Stephen David Kristof 




AUGUST 




8/2 


Monica Frances McElroy 


FEBRUARY 


8/3 


Anita B Kingsbury 


/4 Katherine Barbara Spring 


8/5 


Josephine Agnes Park 


11 Helen Louise Gorman 


8/5 


Rachel Liberatore 


12 1 Henry Roland Brais 


8/12 


Patrina Agnes Gallagher 


/24 Joseph M Keefe 


8/14 


Winifred Frances Thorpe 




8/16 


Irene Yatkowski 


MARCH 


8/17 


Mary R Kelley 


11 David Edward Medeiros 


8/20 


John Joseph McLaughlin 


11 Janet Kirkpatrick 






122 Clara Smethurst Casey 




SEPTEMBER 


121 Amanda Basque 


9/2 


Eleanor Maureen Duduch 


/30 Lorraine Ida Jones 


9/5 


Natasha Rose Domeshek 




9/6 


John W Hinkley 


APRIL 


9/14 


Thomas B Hosking 


/4 Michael Francis O'Brien 


9/24 


John N Ricci 


/ 1 5 Ray William Warburton 


9/26 


Josephine Sybil Ashe 


111 John William Hein 






/24 Priscilla A Morton 




OCTOBER 


125 Melvin Francis Hockabout 


10/1 


Julia Mae Baker 




10/8 


Dorothy Margaret Forbes 


MAY 


10/8 


Eleanor Marie Hunt 


/3 Monya Frances Geller 


10/9 


Olga Mary Zanstuck 


/ 1 Richard Anthony Faro 


10/11 


Elizabeth Lily Simpson 


/14 Myrtle A Mills 


10/17 


Dorothy Eleanor Phipps 


/1 5 Michelle T Doll 


10/22 


James Festus Egan 


111 Mary Elizabeth Rogers 


10/31 


Warren Joseph Marcus 


/25 Sonja Asta Cox 






125 Hazel Edith Davidson 




NOVEMBER 




11/6 


Margaret Elizabeth Weir 


JUNE 


11/8 


Rose Carmella Wallace 


19 Randy C Verni 


11/16 


Lisa M Cummings 


/ 1 9 Dorothy Eileen Jenks 


11/17 


Donald Edmund Reilly 


/26 James F Collins 


11/18 


Gail Marie Fernandes 


/29 Kathleen McManus 


11/19 


Frank Charles Mayer 


/30 Carmelo Pitasi 


11/20 


Thomas Anthony Procop 



159 



1 1/23 David Travers Corcoran 

1 1/27 Joseph Ward Richardson 

DECEMBER 

12/6 Josephine Purcell Doherty 

1 2/9 Alfred Joseph Ricard 

12/16 Joseph J. Dorgan 

12/19 Marie Antoinette Iovanni 

1 2/24 Fred William Clarridge, Jr 

12/26 Andrew V Amorello 

12/27 Martha Watts 

12/27 Elizabeth May Sweeney 



160 



BIRTHS 2002 





JANUARY 


4/14 


Angela Rae Jimenez 


1/4 


Matthew Richard Barrett 


4/15 


Matthew George Thompson 


1/6 


Connor Joseph McKay 


4/18 


Nathaniel Reese Ferrier 


1/10 


Connor James Adams 


4/23 


Madison Grace Ruzzo 


1/10 


Meredith Ashley Adams 


4/23 


Melissa Anne Cox 


1/16 


Anna Patricia Wietrecki 


4/24 


Andrew Joseph Clarke 


1/17 


Carina Marie Christo 


4/25 


Michael Garret Borkan 


1/29 


Mia Beth Reine 


4/25 


Griffin Joseph Zink 


.1/29 


Andrew Myles Gordon 




MAY 




FEBRUARY 


5/11 


Gunnar Hayes Witham 


2/1 


Garrett Theodore Gipson 


5/12 


Taylor Elizabeth Lahaise 


2/2 


Madeline Rachel Mileti 


5/14 


Jacob Robert Bicknell 


2/5 


Kathleen Rose Mulready 


5/15 


Lillian Moran McCormick 


2/6 


Nicole Marie Abely 


5/26 


Benjamin Martin Putonio 


2/6 


Joseph Michael Bourque 






2/7 


Drew Joseph Baacke 




JUNE 


2/10 


Raymond John Hilvert, Jr 


6/1 


Kaylie Beth Keteltas 


2/14 


Arianna Michelle Tristani 


6/1 


Laura Grace Clifford 


2/21 


Abigail Keating Hunt 


6/2 


Raphaela Maria Catriona Gray 


2/22 


Ava Pearson Dunne 


6/3 


Liam Patrick Hoye 


2/22 


Henry Gabriel Lamkin 


6/9 


Andrew Robert Barrette 


2/28 


Erin Margaret Cooney 


6/10 


Colby Parks Gonser 






6/21 


Daniel Ryan Labaer 




MARCH 


6/22 


Ariana Skye Marmai 


3/1 


Joseph Daniel Graham 


6/24 


Nicholas James Merageas 


3/2 


Megan Catherine Whelan 


6/25 


Paul Christopher Marchetti 


3/2 


Kaitlyn Alexandra Whelan 


6/25 


Justin Cormac McGuire 


3/8 


Emily Kate Landro 


6/28 


Brenna Grace Stanton 


3/15 


Troy Gareth Langton 






3/16 


Finnian Keohane Whalen 




JULY 


3/16 


Isaac Drew Popper 


7/2 


Michelle Lynn Conte 


3/17 


Nicole Jordan Tichner 


7/4 


Nathan Lee Tom 


3/18 


Kayla Maki Keegan 


7/5 


Samantha Jane Drumm 


3/20 


Rijs Elliot Johanson Gordet 


7/10 


Anna Dorothy Debettencourt 


3/21 


Luke Nicholas Angelus, II 


7/11 


Harrison James O'Brien 


3/23 


Orko Sen 


7/13 


Emily Violet Rosecrans 


3/26 


Lucas Michael Caira 


7/25 


Andrew C Miller-Klugman 


3/27 


Jocelyn Ella O'Toole 


7/26 


Matthew David McGrory 


3/29 


Colin Francis MacDonald 


7/29 


Braeden Michael Acselrod 






7/30 


Conor Timothy Mynahan 




APRIL 






4/3 


Joseph Philip Romanowski 




AUGUST 


4/12 


Ethan Leeheng Ni 


8/2 


Meghan Isabelle Bannister 



161 



8/3 


Brooks Sullivan Rayment 




8/15 


Natalie Ann Alford 


12/1 


8/15 


Derek Wallace Stevens 


12/3 


8/23 


Colleen Ann Harriman 


12/7 


8/30 


Charles Joseph Marie 


12/10 
12/11 




SEPTEMBER 


12/19 


9/1 


Jackson Forde Foscaldo 


12/20 


9/2 


Kaylene Rose Brooks 


12/24 


9/4 


Marcus Xavier D'Angelo 


12/26 


9/7 


Sophia Rose Flotta 


12/27 


9/8 


Eva Shannon Guerrero O' Toole 


12/27 


9/14 


Andrew John Cochran 


12/29 


9/15 


Marissa Emily Gorog 




9/26 


Jack Edward Shea 




9/26 


Anna Margaret-Mary Johnson 




9/26 


Isabel Ruth Vara 




9/26 


Eliza Ruth Vara 




9/29 


Zachary Aaron Yogel 
OCTOBER 




10/1 


Sarah Elizabeth Churchill 




10/2 


Charlotte Cooke Sullivan 




10/2 


Arleigh Florence Soule 




10/5 


Robert Thomas Spaeth 




10/5 


Caitlin Eileen Knight 




10/6 


Erin Davis Infantino 




10/7 


McLean David Conner 




10/8 


Ella Moor Pezzullo 




10/8 


Josephine Rose Bisciotti 




10/10 


Karlene Carrie Rhuda 




10/13 


Reilly Joan Mulock 




10/17 


Ryan David Murray 




10/19 


Eric Joao Dematos 




10/19 


Eryn Elizabeth Rice 
NOVEMBER 




11/2 


Chloe Rose Pucci 




11/4 


Tristan Scott Marble 




11/4 


Judson Reid Marble 




11/7 


Gabriel Roger Decoste 




11/11 


Peter Nicholas Tzanetos 




11/14 


Ally Rose Dubbs 




11/18 


Allison Maeve Lane 




11/21 


Camilla Fannie Silk 





DECEMBER 

Michael Anthony Vachon 
Jake Michael Kraemer 
William James Barr 
Grace T Keene 
John Robert Shelley 
Edward Paul Viles 
Nicholas Edward Crofts 
Julia Ann Maloney 
Claire Winslow Sawyer 
Paige Taylor Ingram 
Harrison Thomas Sprofera 
Chloe Elizabeth Dudley 



162 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WARRANT FOR FEBRUARY 11, 2002 SPECIAL TOWN 

MEETING 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at 
the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School gymnasium, in said Medfield, on Monday the 
eleventh day of February, A.D., 2002, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there to act on 
the following article: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money in addition 
to the $49,620,000 appropriated under Article one of the January 22, 2001 Special 
Town Meeting and determine how said sum shall be raised for the purpose of 
remodeling, reconstructing and construction additions to the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
High School and the Thomas M. Blake Middle School and Memorial School including 
but not limited to, associated architectural and construction supervision costs, 
furnishings, equipment and related site improvements; and to authorize the 
Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in 
accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (3) and/or (3 A), Section 7, Chapter 44 of 
the General Laws or Chapter 70B of the General Laws or any other enabling authority; 
and to authorize the Permanent School Planning and Building Committee and/or the 
School Committee to enter into contracts with federal, state and/or private parties and 
to accept grants or funds and to take any other action necessary to accomplish said 
purposes; provided, however, that this vote shall not take effect until the Town votes 
to exempt from the limitation on total taxes imposed by General Laws, Chapter 59, 
Section 21C (Proposition 2 Vi) amounts required to pay the principal of and interest on 
the borrowing authorized by this vote; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Permanent School Planning and Building Committee & School 
Committee) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $6,000,000, in addition to the 
$49,620,000 appropriated under Article one of the January 22, 2001 Special Town 
Meeting said sum to be raised by borrowing for the purpose of remodeling, 
reconstructing and constructing additions to the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 
and the Thomas M. Blake Middle School and Memorial School, including but not 
limited to, associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, 
equipment and related site improvements; and that the Treasurer/Collector be 
authorized, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with 
the provisions of paragraphs (3) and/or (3A), Section 7, Chapter 44 of the General 
Laws or Chapter 70B of the General Laws or any other enabling authority; and that the 



163 



Permanent School Planning and Building Committee and/or the School Committee be 
authorized to enter into contracts with federal state and/or private parties and to accept 
grants or funds and to take any other action necessary to accomplish said purposes; 
provided, however, that this vote shall not take effect until the Town votes to exempt 
from the limitation on total taxes imposed by General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C 
(Proposition 2 Vi) amounts required to pay the principal of and interest on the 
borrowing authorized by this vote. 
PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE - YES 1,093 - NO 443 (2/1 1/2002) 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, fourteen days at least before the 
time of holding said Town Meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 8 th day of January, Two Thousand Two. 

Paul B. Rhuda, Chairman S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
Ann Thompson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen days before the 
date of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable of Medfield: Dana Friend S\ 
Date: January 9, 2002 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



164 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 25, 2002 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Joan Lee, John McGowan, Eva Grover, Priscilla Anderson, Joan Bussow, 
Ruth Chick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Mae Maguire, Emmy Mitchell, Phyllis Scott, Dorothy 
Crump, Kathy Lee, Jessie Portmann, Priscilla Batting, Jane Timmerman, Angelo 
Allegretto 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 3,65 1 . There are 7,686 registered voters, 47% of voters voting. 

PRECINCT 
12 3 4 TOTAL 

MODERATOR (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 

George P. Niles, Jr. 591 701 720 670 2682 

Write In 
Blanks 



SELECTMEN (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 
Paul B. Rhuda 
Write In 
Blanks 



10 


16 


8 


10 


44 


239 


208 


280 


198 


925 
3651 


610 


711 


708 


663 


2692 


7 


11 


1 


5 


24 


223 


203 


299 


210 


935 



3651 



ASSESSORS (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 
Francis J. Perry 
Write In 
Blanks 



587 


696 


699 


646 


2628 


2 


2 


- 


2 


6 


251 


227 


309 


230 


1017 



3651 



165 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR NOT 
MORE THAN TWO 
Susan C. Cotter 
Debra M. Noschese 
Write In 
Blanks 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES (three yrs) VOTE FOR NOT 
MORE THAN TWO 
Geoffrey C. Tritsch 
Patricia S. Fitzgerald 
Write In 
Blanks 



544 


640 


659 


606 


2449 


484 


586 


606 


556 


2232 


7 


11 


1 


9 


28 


645 


613 


750 


585 


2593 
7302 



565 


644 


677 


637 


2523 


560 


672 


671 


635 


2538 


- 


2 


1 


6 


9 


555 


532 


667 


478 


2232 
7302 



707 


701 


664 


2671 


4 


- 


1 


9 


214 


307 


213 


971 
3651 



PLANNING BOARD (five yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 
Timothy P. Sullivan 599 

Write In 4 

Blanks 237 



PARK COMMISSIONERS (three yrs) VOTE FOR NOT 

MORE THAN THREE 
Thomas A. Caragliano 
Lisa G. Louttit 
Stephen Farrar 
Write In 
Blanks 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 

Lisa Donovan 15 15 2 23 

William Baxter - 2 - - 2 

Write In - 

Blanks 825 922 1003 876 3626 

3651 



556 


624 


655 


602 


2437 


509 


612 


635 


592 


2348 


47 


57 


30 


26 


160 


10 


18 


3 


3 


34 


398 


1464 


1701 


1411 


5974 
10953 



166 



538 


649 


644 


592 


2423 


2 


2 


- 


2 


6 


300 


274 


364 


284 


1222 
3651 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONER (three yrs) VOTE FOR 

ONE 
Evan Scott Weisenfeld 
Write In 
Blanks 



Question 1 

Proposition 2 X A Debt Exclusion Question 

Shall the Town of Medfleld be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition 
two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the additional bonds to be 
issued in order to finance remodeling, reconstructing and constructing additions to the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School, Thomas M. Blake Middle School and Memorial 
School, including but not limited to associated architectural and construction 
supervision costs, furnishings, equipment and related site improvements. 

YES 
NO 

Blanks 

3651 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

March 26,2002 



392 


522 


577 


456 


1947 


443 


397 


427 


421 


1688 


5 


6 


4 


1 


16 



167 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at 
the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School gymnasium, in said Medfield, on Monday the 
tenth day of June, A.D., 2002, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers for the past year. 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to that 
office. 

(Treasurer/Collector) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz. 



Margaret Flanagan 


$ 1700.00 


Ronald & Joanne Miller 


850.00 


Gus W. Thornton 


3400.00 


Antoinette Cincarelli 


850.00 


William A. Hillerich 


850.00 


Beverly Catalano 


5100.00 


Anthony Tray 


850.00 


Sharon Wozencraft 


425.00 


Nina Schermerhorn 


1700.00 


Herbert & Barbara Grace 


1700.00 


Patricia Vinson 


425.00 


Terese Cummins 


850.00 


Anthony R. Morra 


425.00 




$ 19,125.00 



It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

168 



Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the following named 
streets, or parts thereof: 

Loeffler Lane Sta. 0+0 to 3 1 +79.54 

Planting Field Road Sta. 0+0 to 14+64 

Bunker Road Sta. 0+00 to 4+63 .69 

Inness Circle Sta. 0+00 to 3+27.45 

Jacob Cushman Drive Sta. 0+0 to 2+66.6 

Boyden Road Sta. 1 1+01.92 to 14+08.47 

Vine Brook Road Sta. 3+63.72 to 22+29.69 

As laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the several 
Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and 
easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such 
purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 
It was so VOTED BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (6/11/02) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E Vi to provide for a Fire Alarm revolving fund to be used for fire alarm 
maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not to exceed $6,500 to come from the 
Maintenance Fee account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E Vi to provide for an Ambulance revolving fund to be used for payment of 
principal and interest costs on the ambulance, funds not to exceed $45,000 to come 
from the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend 
from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E Vi to provide for an Advanced Life Support fund to be used for the 
payment of Advanced Life Support charges, funds not to exceed $30,000 to come 
from the users of said services or their insurers and to authorize the Fire Chief to 
expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 



169 



It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation Commissioners, 
Planning Board, Housing Authority and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 



Officer Present Salary W.C. Recommends 



Town Clerk 


$40,000 


$0 


Selectmen, Chairman 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Clerk 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Third Member 


900 


900 


Assessors, Chairman 


900 


900 


Assessors, Clerk 


900 


900 


Assessors, Third Member 


900 


900 


Moderator 








Housing Authority 








School Committee 








Library Trustees 








Planning Board 








Park and Recreation Commissioners 








Trust Fund Commissioners 









(Board of Selectmen) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Article 10 by striking the figure of the Town Clerk's salary 
of $40,000 and replacing with $41,200. PASSED AS AMENDED BY MORE 
THAN MAJORITY VOTE (6/1 0/02) 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY 
SCHEDULE, effective July 1, 2002, to read as set forth in the warrant. 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

POLICE DEPARTMENT AS PER CONTRACT: 



FIVE STEP PLAN 


Weekly 
Minimum 
841.88 
661.04 
581.19 


Step 2 
876.02 
707.41 
610.76 


Step 3 
918.27 
761.79 
645.15 


Step 4 

812.56 
652.23 


Maximum 


Police Sergeant 

Police Officer 

Sr. Police Dispatcher 


1,005.43 
844.91 
715.85 



170 



Dispatcher 


523.20 


553.30 


581.20 


610.76 


645.23 


Specialist Range 


Annual Stipend 


461.84 to 2,640.93 






EIGHT STEP PLAN 

Police Sergeant 


Minimum 
Step 6 
841.88 
929.48 


Step 2 
Step 7 
858.74 
948.06 


Step 3 

Step 8 

884.48 

1,005.43 


Step 4 
893.42 


Step 5 
911.26 


Police Officer 


661.04 
781.17 


680.85 
804.57 


701.27 
844.91 


722.32 


758.39 


Senior Dispatcher 


581.19 
673.71 


598.70 
693.95 


616.23 
715.86 


634.84 


653.99 


Dispatcher 


523.20 
600.50 


539.06 
624.70 


554.93 
645.23 


571.90 


588.87 


Animal Control 
Officer/Inspector 

Assistant Animal 


549.97 

637.81 

Annually 

1,607.00 


567.36 
656.90 

1,756.00 


583.50 
676.85 

1,905.00 


600.89 

2,053.0 



619.57 
2,205.00 


Control Officer 


2,354.00 


2,502.00 


2,680.00 





Police Officers designated as Detective, Photographer/Fingerprinter, Prosecutor, 
Animal Control Officer/ Assistant Animal Control Officer or Training Officer by the 
Police Chief shall receive additional compensation annually at a rate to be determined 
by the Police Chief in the above Specialist Range. In the absence of a police sergeant 
being on duty, the senior office- in- charge, of any shift shall be paid 20% of the 
difference between the police officer's salary and the police sergeant's salary. 



MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Town Administrator 


$74,157 


$92,723 


$115,850 


Police Chief 


$64,715 


$80,947 


$101,210 


Superintendent of Public Works 


$64,715 


$80,947 


$101,210 


Fire Chief 


$60,471 


$75,642 


$94,526 


Treasurer/Collector 


$52,833 


$66,094 


$79,249 


Library Director 


$60,471 


$75,642 


$94,526 


Administrative Assistant 


$40,314 


$50,393 


$60,471 


Town Accountant 


$46,149 


$57,713 


$69,277 


Assistant Town Administrator 


$46,149 


$57,713 


$69,277 


Other Salaried Positions 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Park and Recreation Director 


$40,314 


$50,393 


$60,471 


Detached Social Worker 


$32,920 


$41,163 


$49,332 


Children's Librarian 


$32,920 


$41,163 


$49,332 



171 



Council on Aging Director $32,920 $4 1 , 1 63 $49,332 

Part-time Salaried Positions 



Human Resource Representative 


$15,383 




$19,202 


i 


$23,128 


Conservation Agent 




$15,383 




$19,202 


• 


$23,128 


HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 














GR MIN 


S2 


S3 


S4 


S5 


S6 


S7 


MAX 


1 7.96 


8.46 


8.75 


9.03 


9.29 


9.58 


9.86 


10.12 


2 8.67 


8.92 


9.17 


9.46 


9.73 


10.04 


10.33 


10.63 


3 9.11 


9.39 


9.66 


9.96 


10.27 


10.56 


10.86 


11.21 


4 9.59 


9.87 


10.17 


10.46 


10.79 


11.12 


11.45 


11.80 


5 10.12 


10.44 


10.76 


11.08 


11.42 


11.73 


12.09 


12.38 


6 10.63 


10.93 


11.25 


11.59 


11.94 


12.30 


12.67 


13.06 


7 11.21 


11.44 


11.90 


12.26 


12.64 


13.01 


13.40 


13.75 


8 11.81 


12.14 


12.51 


12.89 


13.27 


13.68 


14.09 


14.51 


9 12.38 


12.75 


13.13 


13.53 


13.93 


14.35 


14.80 


15.26 


10 13.06 


13.45 


13.84 


14.26 


14.68 


15.15 


15.61 


16.07 


11 13.75 


14.18 


14.59 


15.02 


15.49 


15.95 


16.42 


16.92 


12 14.45 


14.87 


15.32 


15.80 


16.27 


16.76 


17.26 


17.78 


13 15.26 


15.72 


16.19 


16.70 


17.20 


17.72 


18.25 


18.79 


14 16.03 


16.51 


17.02 


17.53 


18.06 


18.60 


19.15 


19.72 


15 16.92 


17.45 


17.98 


18.52 


19.07 


19.65 


20.24 


20.85 


16 17.77 


18.31 


18.85 


19.41 


20.00 


20.60 


21.22 


21.85 


17 18.70 


19.28 


19.86 


20.45 


21.06 


21.70 


22.34 


23.02 


18 19.69 


20.28 


20.90 


21.53 


22.17 


22.84 


23.52 


24.23 


19 20.68 


21.30 


21.94 


22.60 


23.28 


23.98 


24.70 


25.43 


20 21.71 


22.36 


23.03 


23.72 


24.43 


25.16 


25.92 


26.70 


21 22.79 


23.48 


24.18 


24.90 


25.65 


26.42 


27.21 


28.03 


22 23.92 


24.66 


25.40 


26.16 


26.95 


27.75 


28.59 


29.44 


Minimum wage $6.75 


per hour. Lower rates as authorized 


by the Commonwealth of 




Massachusetts may also be paid. 















HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



Grade 1 




Page 


' 


Grade 2 




Presently 


No Positions 


Grade 3 




Presently 


No Positions 


Grade 4 




Presently 


No Positions 



Grade 13 

Light Equipment Operator 

Grade 14 

Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Wastewater Treatment Operator 
Administrative Secretary 
Groundskeeper 



172 



Grade 5 
Mini-bus Driver 

Grade 6 

Clerk Typist 

Grade 7 

Skilled Laborer 

Grade 8 

Library Assistant 

Grade 9 

Secretary 

Sr. Library Assistant 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Matron 
Traffic Supervisor 



Grade 15 

Reference Librarian 

Finance Data Processing Supervisor 

Equipment Operator Repairman 

Grade 16 

Sr. Heavy Equipment Operator 

Sr. Administrative Secretary 

Sr. Groundskeeper 

Sr. Water Operator/Repairman 

Tree Warden 

Insect Pest Control 

Call Firefighter 

Firefighter EMT 

Grade 17 

Asst. Wastewater Treatment Operator in Charge 
Asst. Water Operator in Charge 
Sr. Equipment Operator/Repairman 



Grade 10 

Collector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 



Grade 18 

Presently no positions 



Grade 11 

Truck driver 

Grade 12 

Outreach Worker (CO A) 
Custodian 



Grade 19 

Wastewater Treatment Operator in Charge 
Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 

Grade 20 

Senior Foreman 

Sr. Wastewater Treatment Operator in Charge 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS- PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Veterans Agent 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Registrar, Clerk 

Registrar 



Annually 

$5,827 

1984 

1148 

469 



Weekly 



173 



Police Intern 



$340 to $461 



Police- Private Special Detail 
Tree Climber 
Library Page 



Hourly 

$24.82 

16.25 

7.96 to 10.44 



FIRE 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 



Annually 

$2,992 

1,795 

1,436 

622 

622 



INSPECTORS 



$23.24 per inspection 



Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 
Street Inspector 

PARK AND RECREATION 

Program Director 

Swim Pond Director 

Swim Pond Assistant Director 

Swim Team Coach/Guard 

Assistant Coach/Guard 

Water Safety Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Swim Pond Badge Checker 

Swim Pond Maintenance 

Swim Pond Set-up Workers 

Camp Director 

Camp Specialists 

Counselors 



Annual Minimum 


$4,493 


603 


1,238 


227 


3,671 


842 


2,044 


603 


23.24 per inspection 


12.23 per hour 


Annually 


$11,831 to $14,103 


4,929 to 6,769 


3,287 to 4,513 


2,738 to 3,949 


1,753 to 3,047 


2,082 to 3,047 


1,972 to 2,820 


658 to 1,016 


767 to 1,016 


547 to 2,257 


2,191 to 4,513 


1,096 to 4,273 


877 to 2,257 



174 



Jr. Counselor 
Tennis Director 
Tennis Instructor 
Trainee 

Or do or act anything in relation there to 



(Personnel Board) 



219 to 678 

3,287 to 4,513 

658 to 1,129 

6.37 per hour 



VOTED: That the PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN and 

CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE be approved effective 
July 1, 2002 to read as set forth in the warrant as changed, UNDER MANAGERIAL, 
DEPUTY ASSESSOR, MINIMUM $40,314, MIDPOINT $50,393, MAXIMUM 
$60,471. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (6/10/02) 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, 
Board, Commission or Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 2002, or such other sums as the Town may determine 
as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $35,485,442 to defray the operating 
expenses of the various Town Boards, Committees, Commissions and Departments as 
printed in the Warrant Report and/or as amended by this Town Meeting for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 2002 and that to meet said appropriation the following sums 
be raised and appropriated on the fiscal 2003 tax levy or transferred from accounts or 
funds as follows: 

$32,496,720 - Tax levy 

40,000 - Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest Account 
15,000 - Park & Recreation Revolving Account 
1,079,095 - Water Enterprise Fund 
1 ,066,070 - Sewer Enterprise Fund 
125,623 - Sewer Betterment Revenue 
171,459 - Prior Year Debt Exclusion Interest 
191,475 - School Enrollment Growth Aid 
300,000 - Free Cash 
$35,485,442 -TOTAL 

BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (6/1 1/02) 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from the Fiscal 2002 
Tax Levy and/or transfer from available and/or borrow for Capital Expenditures 
including the following: 



175 



DEPARTMENT 
Council on Aging 
Town Accountant 
Police Department 

Open Space Committee 
Fire Department 

Public Works 



PROJECT 

14 Person Passenger Bus 

GASB 34 Compliance 

New Phone System 
Upgrade Holding Cells 
Two (2) Police Cruisers 

Future Land Acquisition 

Refurbish 1984 Pumper 
Defibrillator Upgrade 

6 Wheel Mack Dump Truck (Highway) 
Ford F550 (Tree) 
Sidewalk Plow (Snow) 
Norfolk-Medfield Water Connector (WEF) 
Resurface Subdivisions 



School Department 

Dale Street 

Wheelock 



Modular Classrooms 

New Primary Electrical Service 

Overlay Existing Tiles 



And that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee and/or the Park and 
Recreation Commission be further authorized to contract with and otherwise deal with 
any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital 
expenditure; and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be 
authorized to lease for a term not exceeding five years or borrow in accordance with 
the provisions of Paragraphs 9 and/or 14 of Chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws; and to trade and/or sell toward part of the purchase price the following: 



DEPARTMENT 



TRADE-IN OR SELL 



Public Works 



1975 Mack Truck 

1976 Ford 



Police 



Two Ford Police Cruisers 



Or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Capital Budget Committee) 



176 



VOTED: That the sum of $561,932 be appropriated for the Capital Budget projects 
as recommended in the Warrant Report and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the 
School Committee and/or the Park and Recreation Commission be further authorized 
to contract with and otherwise deal with any federal and state agencies for 
reimbursement of the cost of any capital expenditure; and that the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the School Committee be authorized to lease for a term not exceeding five 
years or borrow in accordance with the provisions of Paragraphs 9 and/or 14 or 
Chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General Laws; and to trade and/or sell toward part of 
the purchase price a 1975 Mack Truck, and Two Ford Police Cruisers and to fund this 
appropriation the following sums be raised or transferred: 

MOTION TO AMEND: To request $26,855 for the 14 passenger bus for the Council 
on Aging. AMENDMENT PASSED (6/10/02) 

MOTION TO AMEND: That the town remove $5,000 from future land acquisition 
to use to offset the 14 passenger bus for the Council on Aging. AMENDMENT 
FAILED (6/10/02) 

ARTICLE PASSES AS AMENDED (6/10/02) 

Tax Levy $416,146 

Unexpended Appropriation Funds: 

Transfer Station tractor (Article 12, 2000 ATM) 14,400 

Highway Chipper (Article 12, 2000 ATM) 7,1 86 

4x4 Utility Vehicle (Article 13, 2001 ATM 1,800 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Fund 45,000 

Stabilization Fund 75,000 
Police Cruiser Trade In Value 400 

Public Works 1975 Mack Truck Trade In 2,000 

TOTAL 561,932 

CAPITAL BUDGET 

DEPARTMENT PROJECT AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 

Council on Aging 14 Passenger Bus $26,855 $26,855 

Board of Assessors Revaluation 75,000 75,000 

Town Accountant GASB 34 Compliance 32,613 25,000 

Police Department New Phone System 10,000 5,000 

Upgrade Holding Cells 21,332 -0- 

Two (2) Police Cruisers 57,960 57,690 



177 



Open Space 








Committee 


Future Land Acquisition 


50,000 


5,000 


Fire Department 


Refurbish 1984 Pumper 


67,500 


67,500 




Defibrillator Upgrade 


9,000 


9,000 


Public Works 


6 Wheel Mack Dump Truck 


104,554 


104,554 




Ford F550 


35,000 


-0- 




Sidewalk Plow 


80,000 


-0- 




Norfolk-Medfield Water 








Connector 


45,000 


45,000 




Resurface Subdivisions 


40,000 


35,000 



School Department 
Dale Street Modular Classrooms 1 06,333 1 06,333 

New Primary Electrical Ser. 75,000 - - 

Wheelock Overlay Existing Tiles 15,000 -0- 

TOTAL $851,147 $561,932 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of section four of 
Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 providing for an additional exemption for a taxpayer 
who shall otherwise qualify for an exemption under clauses 17C, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C. 
22D, 22E, 37, 37A, 41C, 42 or 43 of section five of Chapter 59 of the General Laws, 
which shall be uniform for all exemptions and none of which shall exceed one 
hundred per cent of said exemption for which he qualifies; provided, however, that in 
no instance shall the taxable valuation of such property, after all applicable 
exemptions, be reduced below ten percent of its full and fair cash valuation except 
through the application of section 8 A of Chapter 58 or clause 18 of section 5 of 
Chapter 59 of the General Laws and provided further, that the additional exemption 
shall not result in any taxpayer paying less than the taxes paid in the preceding fiscal 
year except through the application of section 8 A of Chapter 58 or clause 18 of section 
5 of chapter 59 of the General Laws. The provisions of this section shall apply to the 
fiscal year 2003, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purposes of preparing geological and 
site surveys and schematic architectural plans of the Fire/Police stations, the Hannah 
Adams Pfaff building and the present Public Works garage; and of preparing 



178 



geological and site surveys, preliminary and final design plans and construction and 
bidding documents for a new Public Works facility to be located on Town-owned 
property off West Mill Street; and to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, Paragraph (21) or (22), and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Municipal Planning and Building 
Committee to enter into contracts with Federal, State or private parties, including 
engineers, designers and contractors, and to accept grants or funds and to take any 
other action necessary to accomplish said purposes; or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Municipal Planning and Building Committee) 

THIS ARTICLE DID NOT PASS YES -261 NO -544 (6/10/02) 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Medfield School Committee 
to grant a ground lease of a portion of the grounds at the Ralph Wheelock School to 
the Medfield Afterschool Program, for a period not to exceed ten years, for the 
purpose of permitting the installation of a modular building to house a before and after 
school care program upon such terms and conditions as the School Committee 
determines to be in the town's best interests, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the unexpended balance of funds 
from Article 4 of the October 4, 1993 Special Town Meeting (development of Well 
#6) to Article 23 of the April, 2001 Annual Town Meeting (design and construction of 
the Medfield State Hospital Well), said funds to be used in lieu of the bonding 
authorized under said Article 23; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Water and Sewerage) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the unexpended balance of funds from Article 4 of 
the October 4, 1993 Special Town Meeting (development of Well #6) in the amount of 
$673,208.53 to Article 23 of the April, 2001 Annual Town Meeting (design and 
construction of the Medfield State Hospital Well), said funds to be used in lieu of all 
or a portion of the bonding authorized under said Article 23. BY UNANIMOUS 
VOTE (6/10/02) 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the unexpended balance of funds 
from Article 25 of the April, 1988 Annual Town Meeting (Pine, Winter, Pineneedle 
Park sewers) to Article 24 of the April, 2001 Annual Town Meeting (Wastewater 



179 



Treatment Plant upgrade) said funds to be used in lieu of the same amount of bonding 
authorized under said Article 24; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Water and Sewerage) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the unexpended balance of funds from Article 25 of 
the April, 1988 Annual Town Meeting (Pine, Winter, Pineneedle Park sewers) in the 
amount of $598,718.07 to Article 24 of the April, 2001 Annual Town Meeting 
(Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade) said funds to be used in lieu of the same 
amount of bonding authorized under said Article 24. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 
(6/11/02) 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to design and 
construct water mains, services, fire hydrants, valves and appurtenances in Forest 
Street; and to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (1), Section 7, 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and that the 
Water and Sewer Board be authorized to expend funds from the uncommitted Water 
Enterprise Fund reserves to pay for said work and/or to meet the principal and interest 
payments on said borrowing; and to authorize the Water and Sewer Board to enter into 
contracts for said work with consultants, designers and contractors; or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $200,000 to design and construct 
water mains, services, fire hydrants, valves and appurtenances in Forest Street; and 
that the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
authorized to borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (1), Section 7, 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and that the 
Water and Sewer Board be authorized to expend funds from the uncommitted Water 
Enterprise Fund reserves to pay for said work and/or to meet the principal and interest 
payments on said borrowing; and the Water and Sewer Board be authorized to enter 
into contracts for said work with consultants, designers and contractors. BY 
UNANIMOUS VOTE (6/1 1/02) 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the purpose of designing and constructing collector sewer and laterals in south Street 
approximately from its intersection with Spring street (Route 27) to the rail road 
crossing; and that the required sum shall be raised and needed actions taken in this 
matter consistent with the procedures of the Water and Sewer Board; and to authorize 
the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in 
accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (1) and (3), Section 7, Chapter 44 and 
or Chapter 29C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and to 
authorize the board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, eminent domain or 



180 



otherwise, such rights, titles or interests in land as may be necessary to carry out the 
purpose of this article; to authorize the Water and Sewer Board and/or the Board of 
Selectmen to enter into contracts with consultants, designers and contractors; to accept 
grants and/or loads from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and/or the United 
States Government to accomplish said purpose; and to see if the Town will vote to 
contribute up to 5% of the cost of the project; and to authorize the Water and Sewer 
Board to assess betterments in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 80 and 83 of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Sewer Assessment 
Regulation of the Town of Medfield, as may from time to time be amended; provided 
that all appropriations authorized under this article be contingent upon approval of a 
so-called Proposition 2 Vi debt exclusion, in accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21C 
of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

THIS ARTICLE FAILS BY MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE (6/10/02) 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the purpose of designing and constructing collector sewer and laterals in Causeway 
Street approximately from its intersection with Orchard Street to approximately 600 
linear feet beyond its intersection with Jade Walk; and that the required sum shall be 
raised and needed actions taken in this matter consistent with the procedures of the 
Water and Sewer Board; and to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (1) 
and (3), Section 7, Chapter 44 and or Chapter 29C of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles or interests in land as 
may be necessary to carry out the purpose of this article; to authorize the Water and 
Sewer Board and/or the Board of Selectmen to enter into contracts with consultants, 
designers and contractors; to accept grants and/or loads from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and/or the United States Government to accomplish said purpose; and 
to see if the Town will vote to contribute up to 5% of the cost of the project; and to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Board to assess betterments in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 80 and 83 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the Sewer Assessment Regulation of the Town of Medfield, as may 
from time to time be amended; provided that all appropriations authorized under this 
article be contingent upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 Vi debt exclusion, in 
accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

THIS ARTICLE DID NOT PASS (6/1 1/02) 



181 



Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following resolution: 

"Be it resolved by the Town Meeting that the Town of Medfield, 
together with the Towns of Dover and Sherborn communicate to the 
Massachusetts General Court and/or the Office of the Governor its 
enthusiastic support for conveying all or a portion of the remaining 
open land at the Medfield State Hospital complex, which is still under 
the control of the Department of Mental Health, to the Department of 
Environmental Management so that this land may be added to the 
existing Medfield State Forest and/or used to create a new Medfield 
State Park to preserve the land in its natural state and to make it 
available to the residents of Massachusetts for recreational use." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen, Medfield State Hospital Preservation Committee and Park and 
Recreation Commission) 

VOTED: That the Town adopt the following resolution: 

"Be it resolved by the Town Meeting that the Town of Medfield, 
together with the Towns of Dover and Sherborn communicate to the 
Massachusetts General Court and/or the Office of the Governor its 
enthusiastic support for conveying all or a portion of the remaining 
open land at the Medfield State Hospital complex, which is still under 
the control of the Department of Mental Health, to the Department of 
Environmental Management so that this land may be added to the 
existing Medfield State Forest and/or used to create a new Medfield 
State Park to preserve the land in its natural state and to make it 
available to the residents of Massachusetts for recreational use." 

BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (6/1 1/02) 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to delete Section 26, ARTICLE II-TOWN 
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE from the TOWN OF MEDFIELD BYLAW, 
which section reads as follows: 

No salaries or wages shall be disbursed unless appropriated by a vote 
of an annual or special town meeting. No full time or part time 
employees shall be paid a salary or wage from any revolving funds 
except as specifically authorized by statute. This bylaw shall not 
apply to any such salaries or wages paid to school employees. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



182 



(Fire Chief and Park & Recreation Commission) 

THIS ARTICLE WAS DISMISSED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding to 
Section 6.2.1 1 following the last sentence the following: 

"provided that an accessory structure that will not exceed 15 feet by 10 feet, 
and not exceeding 12 feet in height, shall be allowed to be located in the rear 
yard with a setback to the rear lot line of no less than 20 feet and side lot line 
of no less than 12 feet." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: That the Town amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding to Section 6.2. 1 1 
following the last sentence the following: 

"provided that one accessory structure that will not exceed 15 feet by 10 feet, 
and not exceeding 12 feet in height, shall be allowed to be located in the rear 
yard with a setback to the rear lot line of no less than 20 feet and side lot line 
of no less than 12 feet." 

PASSED BY MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE (6/10/02) 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate an additional sum of money 
to the fy02 Liability Insurance budget, account 01-945-2, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

THIS ARTICLE WAS DISMISSED (Consent Calendar 6/10/02) 

Article 26. To see if the town will authorize the Board of Assessors to use a sum of 
money from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2003, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Assessors to use the sum of 
$1,31 1,000 from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 
2003. (6/11/02) 



183 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time 
of holding said Town Meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 16 th day of April, Two-Thousand and Two. 

Osier L. Peterson, Chairman S\ 

Ann B. Thompson S\ 

Paul Rhuda S\ 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purposes 
named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before 
the date of the elections as within directed. 

Constable: Richard Bishop 
Date: April 17,2002 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer, CMC 
TOWN CLERK 

Springfield Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to Zoning By-Laws adopted under Article 24 of the 
warrant for the Annual Town Meeting that convened on June 10, 2002 has been 
approved by the Attorney General's Office. 

THOMAS F. REILLY 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 

By Kelli E. Lawrence S\ 
Assistant Attorney General 
August 9, 2002 



184 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WARRANT FOR JUNE 10, 2002 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at 
the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School gymnasium, in said Medfield, on Monday the 
tenth day of June, A.D., 2002, at 8:30 o'clock P.M., then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer an amount from uncommitted 
Water Enterprise Fund reserves to the fy02 Water Department Operations account, 60- 
410-2 or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the sum of $65,811 from uncommitted Water 
Enterprise Fund reserves to the fy02 Water Department Operations account, 60-410-2. 
(BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 6/10/2002) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer an amount from uncommitted 
Sewer Enterprise Fund reserves to the fy02 Sewer Department, Operations account, 
60-420-2 or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the sum of $38,564 from uncommitted Sewer 

Enterprise Fund reserves to the fy02 Sewer Department, Operations account, 60-420- 

2. 

(BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 6/12/2002) 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to rescind or reduce the additional $6 
million bonding authorization voted under Article 1 of the February 1 1 , 2002 Special 
Town Meeting for the purpose of remodeling, reconstruction and constructing 
additions to the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School and the Thomas M. Blake Middle 
School and Memorial School, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

THIS ARTICLE DID NOT PASS -YES -373 NO-1203 (6/10/2002) 



185 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to change the time of the Annual Town 
Meeting as set out in the Town Charter from the last Monday in April to 12:00 noon 
on the last Saturday in April, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

THIS ARTICLE DID NOT PASS (6/10/2002) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of designing and constructing collector sewer and laterals, in Lawrence 
Court and Lawrence Circle; and that the required sum shall be raised and needed 
actions taken in this matter consistent with the procedures of the Water and Sewerage 
Board; and to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (1) and (3), 
Section 7, Chapter 44 and/or Chapter 29C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, 
eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles or interests in land as may be 
necessary to carry out the purpose of this article; to authorize the Water and Sewerage 
Board and/or the Board of Selectmen to enter into contracts with consultants, 
designers and contractors; to accept grants and/or loans from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and/or the United States Government to accomplish said purpose; and 
to see if the Town will vote to contribute up to 5% of the cost of the project; and to 
authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to assess betterments in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 80 and 83 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the Sewer Assessment Regulations of the Town of Medfield as 
may from time to time be amended; provided that all appropriations authorized under 
this article be contingent upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 J4 debt exclusion 
in accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21 C of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTED: To dismiss this article - BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (6/10/2002) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to make available a portion of Town- 
owned land, approximately three and one-half acres in size, said land being a portion 
of a parcel of land identified as lot 43, Map 56 on the Medfield Board of Assessor's 
Maps, or any other Town land, which the Town Meeting deems appropriate to the 
Council on Aging, said land to be used for construction of an adult community center, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTED: That the Town make available a portion of Town-owned land, 
approximately three and one-half acres in size, said land being a portion of a parcel of 
land identified as lot 43, Map 56 on the Medfield Board of Assessor's Maps, or any 



186 



other Town land, which the Town Meeting deems appropriate to the Council on 
Aging, said land to be used for construction of a Senior/ Adult community center. 
YES -691 NO-620 (6/10/2002) 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised, for the purpose of preparing 
detailed site surveys, construction plans and bid specifications for an adult center; to 
authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to 
borrow in accordance with the provisions of clause (21) and/or clause (22), paragraph 
7, chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General Laws; and authorize the Council on Aging 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to apply for grants from the federal 
and/or state governments and or private parties and to enter into contracts to 
accomplish said purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $158,500, said sum to be raised by 
borrowing, for the purpose of preparing detailed site surveys, construction plans and 
bid specifications for an senior/adult center; that the Treasurer/Collector, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow in accordance with the 
provision of clause (21) and/or clause (22), paragraph 7, chapter 44 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws; and that the Council on Aging and/or Adult Community 
Center Study committee, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized 
to apply for grants from the federal and/or state governments and/or private parties and 
to enter into contracts to accomplish said purposes. PASSED BY MORE THAN 2/3 
VOTE (6/10/2002) 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, fourteen days at least before the 
time of holding said Town Meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 14 th day of May, Two Thousand Two. 

Osier Peterson, Chairman S\ 
Ann Thompson S\ 
Paul B. Rhuda S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



187 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen days before the 
date of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable of Medfield: Dana P. Friend 
Date: May 15,2002 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC 
TOWN CLERK 



188 



WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

SEPTEMBER 17, 2002 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at the Ralph 
Wheelock School in said Medfield on TUESDAY, THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OF 
SEPTEMBER, 2002 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

LT. GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR 2 nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT Norfolk & Bristol District 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 13 th Norfolk District -P 1 &2 

9 th Norfolk District - P 3 & 4 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Norfolk District 

REGISTER OF PROBATE Norfolk County 

COUNTY TREASURER Norfolk County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Norfolk County 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield seven days at least before the time of 
holding said Town Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the State Primary Election aforesaid. Given unto 
our hands this 6th day of August, 2002. 

Osier Peterson, Chairman S\ 
Ann B. Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



189 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public places in the 
Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

Constable: Richard D. Bishop S\ 
Date: August 7, 2002 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



CAROL A. MAYER, CMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



190 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE PRIMARY 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 



2002 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Andy Thompson, John McGowan, Eric Iafolla, Eva Grover, Priscilla 
Anderson, Ruth Chick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Mae Maguire, Emmy Mitchell, Joanne 
Kunz, Phyllis Scott, Dorothy Crump, Jessie Portmann, Barbara Reynolds, Joanne 
Murray, Jane Timmerman and Al Alegretto. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2, 273. Total registered voters numbered 7, 747, 29% of the voters 
voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 




PRECINCT 




SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for ONE 


1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


John F. Kerry 


282 


282 


332 


269 


1165- 


Scattered 


2 


1 





3 


6 


Blanks 


61 


50 


52 


52 


215 
1386 


GOVERNOR vote for ONE 












Thomas F. Birmingham 


56 


47 


55 


44 


202 


Steven Grossman 


5 


4 


2 


1 


12 


Shannon P. O'Brien 


112 


117 


127 


112 


468 


Robert B. Reich 


93 


102 


117 


93 


405 


Warren E. Tolman 


73 


61 


80 


72 


286 


Scattered 

















Blanks 


6 


2 


3 


2 


13 
1386 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR vote for ONE 












Christopher F. Gabrieli 


135 


121 


163 


119 


538 


Lois G. Pines 


126 


122 


131 


118 


497 


John P. Slattery 


47 


47 


59 


47 


200 


Scattered 

















Blanks 


37 


43 


31 


40 


151 
1386 



191 



ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for ONE 










Thomas F. Reilly 


268 


273 


318 


244 


Scattered 


1 


1 








Blanks 


76 


59 


66 


80 


SECRETARY OF STATE vote for ONE 










William Francis Galvin 


250 


261 


298 


235 


Scattered 














Blanks 


95 


72 


86 


89 



TREASURER vote for ONE 
Michael P. Cahill 
Timothy P. Cahill 
Stephen J. Murphy 
James W. Segel 
Scattered 
Blanks 



AUDITOR vote for ONE 
A. Joseph DeNucci 
Scattered 
Blanks 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 

ONE 

Stephen F. Lynch 

William A. Ferguson, Jr 

Scattered 

Blanks 



COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 

Kelly A. Timilty 

Chesley Oriel 

Kerby Roberson 

Scattered 

Blanks 



24 


27 


22 


25 


43 


128 


172 


131 


37 


37 


35 


26 


95 


91 


108 


101 














46 


50 


47 


41 



242 


239 


274 


212 














103 


94 


110 


112 



:23 


227 


233 


191 


66 


66 


102 


77 





2 





4 


56 


38 


49 


52 



135 


134 


156 


119 


63 


63 


65 


72 


30 


18 


25 


23 














117 


118 


138 


110 



192 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 



Scattered 


5 


2 


1 





8 


Blanks 


340 


331 


383 


324 


1378 
1386 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 












for ONE 












Lida E. Harkins 


267 


268 






535 


Scattered 

















Blanks 


78 


65 


384 


324 


851 
1386 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for ONE 












William R. Keating 


256 


255 


295 


231 


1037 


Scattered 

















Blanks 


89 


78 


89 


93 


349 
1386 


REGISTER OF PROBATE vote for ONE 












Patrick W. McDermott 


126 


111 


133 


111 


481 


Mark H. Tobin 


113 


111 


119 


98 


441 


Scattered 





1 








1 


Blanks 


106 


110 


132 


115 


463 
1386. 


COUNTY TREASURER vote for ONE 












Joseph A. Connolly 


82 


77 


91 


88 


338 


Michael J. Joyce 


97 


100 


106 


77 


380 


Thomas P. Koch 


66 


50 


75 


60 


251 


Scattered 

















Blanks 


100 


106 


112 


99 


417 
1386 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for ONE 












Peter H. Collins 


220 


210 


234 


188 


852 


Scattered 

















Blanks 


125 


123 


150 


136 


534 
1386 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



5 


2 


2 


5 


14 


197 


197 


243 


228 


865 
879 



193 



GOVERNOR vote for ONE 

Mitt Romney 

Scattered 

Blanks 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR vote for ONE 

Kerry Murphy Healey 

Jim Rappaport 

Scattered 

Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



SECRETARY OF STATE vote for ONE 

Jack E. Robinson, III 

Scattered 

Blanks 



TREASURER vote for ONE 
Daniel A. Grabauskas 
Bruce A. Herzfelder 
Scattered 
Blanks 



AUDITOR vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 

ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 
Scattered 



194 



192 


181 


218 


221 


812 





4 


1 





5 


10 


14 


26 


12 


62 
879 


143 


130 


160 


170 


603 


57 


67 


78 


59 


261 





1 








1 


2 


1 


7 


4 


14 
879 


6 











6 


196 


199 


245 


233 


873 
879 


93 


102 


126 


138 


459 

















109 


97 


119 


95 


420 
879 


83 


71 


82 


96 


332 


89 


92 


105 


90 


376 





1 








1 


30 


35 


58 


47 


170 
879 





4 





2 


6 


202 


195 


245 


231 


873 
879 






3 








3 


202 


196 


245 


233 


876 
879 



Blanks 


201 


199 


245 


233 


878 
879 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 

Jo Ann Sprague 

Scattered 

Blanks 


164 



38 


163 



36 


197 



48 


201 



32 


725 



154 

879 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GERAL COURT vote for 

ONE 

Scott P. Brown 

Scattered 

Blanks 


2 
200 



199 


156 



89 


172 



61 


328 

2 

549 

879 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



202 



199 



245 


1 
232 


1 
878 
879 


REGISTER OF PROBATE vote for ONE 

Richard P. Schmidt 

Scattered 

Blanks 


124 


78 


131 



68 


154 



91 


164 



69 


573 

Q_ 
306 
879 


COUNTY TREASURER vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



202 



199 



245 



233 



879 
879 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



202 



199 



245 



233 



879 
879 


LIBERTARIAN BALLOTS 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for ONE 

Michael E. Cloud 

Scattered 

Blanks 


2 














1 




3 


3 



195 



GOVERNOR vote for ONE 
Carla A. Howell 
Scattered 
Blanks 


2 














1 





3 


3 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR vote for ONE 

Richard P. Aucoin 

Scattered 

Blanks 


1 


1 












1 





2 


1 

3 


ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 




2 












1 



3 
3 


SECRETARY OF STATE vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 




2 












1 



3 
3 


TREASURER vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



2 












1 



3 
3 


AUDITOR vote for ONE 
Kamal Jain 
Scattered 
Blanks 





2 












1 





1 

2 
3 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 

ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



2 












1 



3 
3 


COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 




2 












1 



3 
3 



196 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 












Scattered 

















Blanks 


2 








1 


3 
3 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 
for ONE 



Scattered 

















Blanks 


2 








1 


3 
3 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for ONE 












Scattered 

















Blanks 


2 








1 


3 
3 


REGISTER OF PROBATE vote for ONE 












Scattered 

















Blanks 


2 








1 


3 
3 



COUNTY TREASURER vote for ONE 

Scattered a 

Blanks 2 1 3 

3 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 2 1 3 

3 

GREEN PARTY BALLOTS 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 



GOVERNOR vote for ONE 

Jill E. Stein 

Scattered 

Blanks 





















2 


1 


2 


5 
5 





2 


1 


2 


5 






























5 



197 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR vote for ONE 

Anthony F. Lorenzen 2 12 

Scattered 

Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 


SECRETARY OF STATE vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 


TREASURER vote for ONE 
James O'Keefe 
Scattered 
Blanks 







2 




1 





2 




AUDITOR vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS voter for 

ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 


COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 

Scattered ' 

Blanks 








2 




1 



2 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 2 12 



198 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 

for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 



5 
5 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 



1 




2 



5 
5 


REGISTER OF PROBATE vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 







2 




1 




2 



5 
5 


COUNTY TREASURER vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 




5 
5 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for ONE 

Scattered 

Blanks 








2 




1 




2 



5 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. After the results were announced, the ballots 
checked, voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
September 20, 2002 



199 



WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

NOVEMBER 5, 2002 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at the Ralph 
Wheelock School in said Medfield on TUESDAY, THE FIFTH DAY OF 
NOVEMBER, 2002 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

LT. GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR 2 nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT Norfolk & Bristol District 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 13 th Norfolk District -P 1 &2 

9 th Norfolk District - P 3 & 4 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Norfolk District 

REGISTER OF PROBATE Norfolk County 

COUNTY TREASURER Norfolk County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Norfolk County 

QUESTIONS 

#1 - Eliminating State Personal Income Tax 

#2 - English Language Education in Public Schools 

#3 - Taxpayer funding for Political Campaigns (This question is not binding) 



200 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield seven days at least before the time of 
holding said State Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the State Election aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 22nd day of October, 2002. 



Osier Peterson, S\ Chairman 
Ann B. Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public places in the 
Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

Constable: Sean Garvey S\ 
Date: October 23, 2002 



201 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE ELECTION 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2002 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Andy Thompson, John McGowan, Eric Iafolla, Andrew Clark, Ruth 
Chick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Phyllis Scott, Patricia Rioux, Kathy Lee, Rita Allegretto, 
Jessie Portmann, Joanne Murray, Jane Timmerman, Angelo Allegretto, Katie Goth 
and Micah Winograd. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 5,635. Total registered voters numbered 7,874, 71% of the voters 
voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PRECINCT 





1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for ONE 












John F. Kerry 


911 


942 


1040 


936 


3829 


Michael E. Cloud 


267 


281 


294 


303 


1145 


Randall C. Forsberg 


7 


12 


10 


9 


38 


Write In 


5 


4 


3 





12 


Blanks 


152 


139 


168 


152 


611 
5635 



GOVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

vote for ONE 

Howell and Aucoin 

O'Brien and Gabrieli 

Romney and Healey 

Stein and Lorenzen 

Johnson and Schebel 

Write In 

Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for ONE 
Thomas F. Reilly 
Write In 



6 


3 


9 


10 


28 


418 


433 


427 


377 


1655 


844 


894 


1014 


937 


3689 


53 


36 


52 


63 


204 


10 


4 


6 


4 


24 


1 











1 


10 


8 


7 


9 


34 
5635 


950 


1010 


1072 


958 


3990 


5 


6 


5 


7 


23 



202 



Blanks 



SECRETARY OF STATE vote for ONE 

William Francis Galvin 

Jack E. Robinson, III 

Write In 

Blanks 



TREASURER vote for ONE 
Timothy P. Cahill 
Daniel A Grabauskas 
James O'Keefe 
Write In 
Blanks 

AUDITOR vote for ONE 

A. Joseph DeNucci 

Kamal Jain 

John James Xenakis 

Write In 

Blanks 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 
ONE 

Stephen F. Lynch 896 990 1007 912 3805 

Write In 7 4 7 6 24 

Blanks 439 384 501 482 1806 

5635 

COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 

Kelly A. Timilty 816 897 926 836 3475 

Write In 13 11 6 

Blanks 525 478 588 563 2154 

5635 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 

JoAnnSprague 1026 1079 1188 1078 4371 

Write In 3 3 13 10 

Blanks 313 296 326 319 1254 

5635 



387 


362 


438 


435 


1622 
5635 


858 


848 


921 


832 


3459 


343 


393 


439 


427 


1602 


2 


1 


6 


2 


11 


139 


136 


149 


139 


563 
5635 


557 


598 


622 


540 


2317 


621 


638 


737 


693 


2689 


68 


63 


53 


69 


253 

















96 


79 


103 


98 


376 
5635 


872 


871 


945 


837 


3525 


68 


78 


82 


92 


320 


155 


201 


209 


210 


775 





1 





1 


2 


247 


227 


279 


260 


1013 
5635- 



203 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 

for ONE 

Lida E. Harkins (P 1 & 2) 

Scott P. Brown (P 3& 4) 

Write In 

Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for ONE 
William R. Keating 
Write In 
Blanks 



REGISTER OF PROBATE vote for ONE 

Patrick W. McDermott 

Richard P. Schmidt 

Write In 

Blanks 



COUNTY TREASURER vote for ONE 
Joseph A. Connolly 
Write In 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for ONE 
Peter H. Collins 
Write In 
Blanks 



930 


973 






1903 






1068 


972 


2040 


3 


5 


1 





9 


409 


400 


446 


428 


1683 
5635 


897 


984 


1028 


911 


3820 


1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


444 


392 


486 


488 


1810 
5635 


539 


540 


547 


475 


2101 


592 


612 


716 


689 


2609 

















211 


226 


252 


236 


925 
5635 


820 


894 


932 


832 


3478 








2 


1 


3 


522 


484 


581 


567 


2154 
5635 


795 


876 


914 


823 


3408 


1 








1 


2 


546 


502 


601 


576 


2225 
5635 



OUESTIONS 














#1 ELIMINATING STATE 


PERSONAL 












INCOME TAX 














Yes 




518 


609 


630 


619 


2376 


No 




693 


645 


731 


646 


2715 


Blanks 




131 


124 


154 


135 


544 
5635 



204 



#2 ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION IN 












PUBLIC SCHOOLS 












Yes 


921 


969 


1078 


968 


3936 


No 


366 


366 


390 


330 


1452 


Blanks 


55 


43 


47 


102 


247 
5635 


#3 TAXPAYER FUNDING FOR POLITICAL 












CAMPAIGNS (Non Binding) 












Yes 


355 


350 


465 


364 


1534 


No 


894 


961 


953 


897 


3705 


Blanks 


93 


67 


97 


139 


396 



5635 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. After the results were announced, the ballots 
checked, voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
November 8, 2002 



205 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2002 



206 



2002 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 

2001, 2002 AND 2003 



2001 






1 Residential 




2 Open Space 




3 Commercial 




4 Industrial 




5 Personal Property 



Total Real and Personal Property 



Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



3898 

116 

133 

46 

205 


$1,364,529,350.00 

$4,609,900.00 

$40,783,050.00 

$31,313,600.00 

$14,522,624.00 


4398 


$1,455,758,524.00 




$20,016,679.71 

$93,738.05 

$13.75 



1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


3907 

114 

144 

49 

199 


$1,382,324,600.00 

$4,119,100.00 

$40,972,800.00 

$32,180,950.00 

$14,405,194.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4413 


$1,474,002,644.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$21,946,289.30 

$64,615.06 

$14.91 


2003 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


3923 

112 

133 

49 

182 


$1,394,860,000.00 

$3,832,050.00 

$41,033,250.00 

$32,312,750.00 

$15,691,487.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4399 


$1,487,729,537.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$23,744,163.41 

$103,869.41 

$15.96 



207 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes receivable as of June 30, 2002 



Fiscal Year 


Real Estate 


Personal Propertv 


Excise Tax 


2002 


154,107.91 


3,809.80 


245,585.71 


2001 


$3,550.25 


$1,065.74 


$21,139.36 


2000 


2,319.93 


614.31 


8,486.40 


1999 


7,293.56 


1,831.14 


4,612.74 


1998 


10,131.29 


2,302.92 


5,020.86 


1997 and Prior 





2,809.09 


47,796.91 


TOTAL 


177,402.94 


12,433.00 


332,641.98 


Tax Title 




$87,391.43 




Taxes in Litigation 




46,334.59 




Water Rates Receivable 




$218,730.24 




Sewer Rates Receivable 




$137,357.77 





ADDED TO TAXES: 

Septic 

Water and Sewer Liens 

Committed Interest 




1,103.59 
1,038.86 



Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas 
Tax Collector 



208 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



Statement of Cash 

Receipts Fiscal Year 2002 
Including investment returns 

Disbursements Fiscal Year 2002 
Including reinvestments 

Cash in Banks on June 30, 2002 



$52,386,771.57 



$46,886,264.43 



$22,186,917.82 



Statement of Investments 

Pooled Investment Fund 
Investments with MMDT June 30, 
2002 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 2002 



Outstanding Debt Accounts June 30,2002 

Debt Exclusion: 

Town Land Acquisition 

Sewers 

School Construction 

Library Renovation 

School Roofs 

Additional School Roofs 

HS/Middle School/Memorial Construction 



$4,065,273.47 
$29,252,191.29 



Statement of Interest Received on Savings/Investments 

General Fund $499,842.05 

Pooled Investment Fund $103,688.16 

Total Interest Received in Fiscal 2002 



1,320,840 

13,913,443 

5,794,160 

1,530,000 

620,000 

580,000 

36,470,000 



$603,530.21 



209 



Non-Exclusion: 

Fire Truck $160,000 

Town Hall Renovation 1 ,725,000 

Cap Landfill 625,000 

Athletic Facilities 140,000 

School Adm. Remodel 75,000 

Land Acquisitions 2,950,000 

Health Septic Loans (MWPAT) 74,538 

Ambulance 100,000 

Enterprise Fund: 

Well No. 6 1,130,000 

Water Treatment Plant 350,000 

Causeway Water Main 800,000 

WWTP Improvements 2,300,000 

Total Long Term Debt 70,657,981 



210 



TOWN TREASURER 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Funds in Custody of the Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $2,620, 150.18 

Conservation 1 76,022.76 

Stabilization 72 1 ,725 .37 

Special Unemployment Insurance 232,654.70 

Group Insurance 97,848. 1 

Library Trusts 15,573.63 

Granville Dailey-Library 80,7 1 6.97 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 44,640.65 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 587,382.78 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 9,5 1 3 . 1 

Municipal Insurance 235, 1 96. 1 3 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 120,762.72 

Council on Aging 1 ,875.89 

Palumbo Sports Fund 3,022.90 

Pilgrim Health Care Fund 56,753.89 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 9,506.54 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 3,978.89 

Tri-Centennial Trust 2,544.77 

School Essay Fund 3,286.35 

Allendale Sewer Pumping Station Fund 53,329.95 

Dela Park Acres Trust 14,357.70 

Cedarview Acres 13,645.42 

Carruth Sewer District 1 3,694.44 

Maude Washburn Trust Fund 3,087.45 

Playground Trust 3,337.81 

Elderly & Disabled Trust 1,914.28 



Balance June 30, 2002 $5,126,523.37 

Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas 

Treasurer/Collector 211 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2002 



FUND: 



01 GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 

BALANCE 



ASSETS 




01 


101000 


01 


119093 


01 


121000 


01 


121001 


01 


121002 


01 


121097 


01 


121098 


01 


121099 


01 


122000 


01 


122001 


01 


122002 


01 


122097 


01 


122098 


01 


122099 


01 


123000 


01 


123001 


01 


123002 


01 


123097 


01 


123098 


01 


123099 


01 


124000 


01 


125300 


01 


125400 


01 


126098 


01 


126099 


01 


126100 


01 


126101 


01 


126102 


01 


134000 


01 


134002 


01 


135000 


01 


136000 


01 


137000 


01 


138000 


01 


143101 


01 


143102 


01 


143900 


01 


161010 


01 


161033 


01 


161080 



CASH 

PRIOR TO 98 MVE RECBL 

2000 PERSONAL PROP TAX REC 

2001 PERSONAL PROP TAX REC 

2002 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 

1997 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC. 

1998 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 

1999 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 

2000 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 

2001 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 

2002 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 

1997 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 

1998 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 

1999 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
PROV FOR ABATE/ EXEMPT - 2000 
PROV FOR ABATE/ EXEMPT - 2001 
PROV FOR ABATE/ EXEMPT - 2002 
PROV FOR ABATE/ EXEMPT - 1997 
PROV FOR ABATE/ EXEMPT - 1998 
PROV FOR ABATE/ EXEMPT - 1999 
TAX TITLE/ LIENS RECEIVABLE 
DEFERRED TAXES RECEIVABLE 
TAXES IN LITIGATION RECEIVABLE 

1998 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 

1999 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 

2000 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 

2001 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 

2002 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 
AMBULANCE CHARGES RECEIVABLE 
AMB CHGS BILLG AGENCY REC 
AMBULANCE MILEAGE RECEIVABLE 
POLICE SPECIAL DETAIL RECBLE 
ADV LIFE SUPPORT RECErVABLE 
COMMERCIAL TRASH FEE RECBLE 

2001 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 

2002 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 
COMMITTED INTEREST SEWER AD/TX 
CHERRY SHEET-NON RECURRING REC 
DUE FROM SPECIAL REV FUND -33 
DUE FROM TRUST FUND-80 

TOTAL ASSETS 



29,252,375.29 

47,796.91 

614.31 

1,065.74 

3,809.80 

2,809.09 

2,302.92 

1,831.14 

2,319.93 

3,550.25 

154,107.91 

11,272.58 

-1,141.29 

7,293.56 

-24,654.07 

-42,022.87 

-7,165.98 

-5,000.00 

-5,000.00 

-5,000.00 

97,512.21 

43,112.97 

46,334.59 

5,020.86 

4,612.74 

8,486.40 

21,139.36 

245,585.71 

93,921.38 

44,664.11 

57,811.33 

108,465.99 

15,610.64 

286.50 

116.95 

986.64 

1,038.86 

5,020.00 

13,268.47 

-1,215.77 

30,212,945.16 



212 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 



2002 



FUND: 



01 GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 



LIABILITIES 




01 


120000 


01 


124001 


01 


125301 


01 


125401 


01 


126000 


01 


134100 


01 


135100 


01 


136100 


01 


137100 


01 


138100 


01 


143925 


01 


201000 


01 


222000 


01 


222200 


01 


222500 


01 


223000 


01 


223100 


01 


225000 


01 


226800 


01 


227010 


01 


227011 


01 


238020 


01 


238021 


01 


238030 


01 


238031 


01 


238032 


01 


238040 


01 


238041 


01 


238060 


01 


252000 


UND BALANCE 




01 


313000 


01 


324001 


01 


324002 


01 


324005 


01 


325000 


01 


327000 


01 


328000 


01 


329100 


01 


333000 


01 


359000 



DEFERRED REAL EST & PERS PROP TX 
DEFERRED TAX TITLE/LIENS 
DEFERRED FOR DEFERRED TAXES 
DEFERRED LITIGATION TAXES 
DEFERRED/UNCOLL MVE TAX 
DEFERRED/UNCOLL AMB CHARGES 
DEFERRED/UNCOLL AMB MILEAGE 
DEFERRED POUCE SPECIAL DETAIL 
DEFERRED ADV LIFE SUPPORT 
DEFERRED COMM TRASH FEES 
DEFERRED SPECIAL BETTERMENT 
WARRANTS PAYABLE 
RETIREMENT W/H FROM PAY 
VOLUNTARY LIFE INSURANCE PAY 
ANNUITY W/H PAYABLE 
HEALTH INSURANCE W/H PAYABLE 
LIFE INSURANCE W/H PAYABLE 
TEACHERS UNION DUES W/H PAYBL 
DENTAL INSURANCE W/H PAYABLE 
PLNG BD REFUNDBL DEPOSIT PAYBL 
CONSERVATION PROJ DEPOSIT PAYB 
DUE TO SPECIAL REVENUE FUND -20 
DUE TO SPECIAL REVENUE FUND -21 
DUE TO SPECIAL REVENUE FUND -30 
DUE TO SPECIAL REVENUE FUND -31 
DUE TO SPECIAL REVENUE FUND -32 
DUE TO CAPITAL PROJECT FUND -40 
DUE TO SEWER CAP PROJ FUND -41 
DUE TO W&S ENTERPRISE - FUND 60 
TAILINGS 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



F/B RES TREAS TAX TITLE 

F/B RES FOR ENCUMBRANCE 

F/B RES FOR EXP-SPECIAL ARTICLES 

F/B RES FOR EXP-SCH ENR GR AID 

F/B RES FOR EXP-COURT JUDGEMENTS 

F/B RES FOR DEBT EXCL-UNEXP P Y IN 

F/B RES FOR DBT EXCL-SB REV FOR 03 

F/B CS OVER/UNDER ASSESSMENT 

F/B RES FOR EXPEND FR F C 

FUND EQUITY/ RETAINED EARNINGS 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE 
TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



-100,993.02 

-97,512.21 

-43,112.97 

-46,334.59 

-332,641.98 

-138,585.49 

-57,811.33 

-108,465.99 

-15,610.64 

-286.50 

-2,142.45 

-1,184,939.81 

-12,963.56 

-1,374.80 

-5,127.83 

-41,148.84 

-393.13 

-48.85 

-15,857.41 

-12,292.01 

-2,500.00 

-133,802.70 

-406,231.03 

-177,446.68 

-1,772,669.40 

-236,212.54 

-9,625,385.15 

-5,657,039.89 

-5,425,401.63 

-3,077.07 

-25,657,409.50 

-15,179.34 

-385,901.01 

-397,902.27 

-191,475.00 

103,899.60 

-171,459.37 

-125,623.00 

16,338.00 

-1,611,000.00 

-1,777,233.27 

-4,555,535.66 
-30,212,945.16 



FREE CASH CERTIFIED $1,673,319 



213 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 20 Detail 
Fiscal Year 2002 





Account 






Balance 




Number 
20-004 


Account Title 

Community Partnership Grant 




6/30/02 


F 


$ 


3,249.00 


F 


20-005 


Drug Free School Grant 


$ 


2,282.98 


F 


20-007 


Title VIB-Early Childhood 


$ 


1,501.42 


F 


20-008 


Title VIB-941 142 


$ 


17,038.10 


S 


20-009 


Dwight Eisenhower Grant 


$ 


4,866.16 


S 


20-011 


TEC Metrowest HS Alliant Grant 


$ 


771.81 


F 


20-012 


Paul Newman Assoc. Grant 


$ 


41.10 


S 


20-014 


SPED Supporting Access to Curr 


$ 


5,932.87 


F 


20-015 


Health Education Grant 


$ 


0.16 


S 


20-018 


Chap. II Satelite Grant 


$ 


3,386.00 


F 


20-020 


DOE-FY98 Foundation Dollars 


$ 


1,197.60 


S 


20-027 


F-Technology Literacy Challenge 


$ 


4,830.56 


S 


20-033 


Class Size Reduction 


$ 


4,638.27 


S 


20-034 


Teen Dating Violence Grant 


$ 


145.17 


F 


20-035 


Subsidiary Agreement Grant 


$ 


82,421.50 


S 


20-039 


SPED Electronic Portfolio Grant 


$ 
$ 


1,500.00 
133,802.70 






Total Federal 


$ 


45,976.36 






Total State 


$ 


87,826.34 






Total School Grants 


$ 


133,802.70 



214 





TownofMedfield 








Fund 21 Detail 






Account 


Fiscal Year 2002 




Balance 


Number 


Account Title 

School Athletic Revolving 




6/30/02 


21-003 


$ 


10,351.12 


21-004 


Adult Education 


$ 


37,976.50 


21-006 


Tuition Revolving 


$ 


6,410.20 


21-007 


Fine Arts revolving 


$ 


5,154.70 


21-015 


Summer Enrichment Program 


$ 


46.13 


21-016 


School Intramurals 


$ 


14,784.60 


21-017 


Substitute Teachers 


$ 


84.27 


21-019 


Middle School Interscholastic 


$ 


3,586.55 


21-020 


Community Partnerhip 


$ 


791.98 


21-021 


Medfleld Coalition for Publ Ed 


$ 


42,398.57 




Subtotal 


$ 


121,584.62 


21-001 


School Lunch 


$ 


273,987.00 


21-005 


Capital Improvement 


$ 


2,454.00 


21-008 


Custodian Detail Revolving 


$ 


3,812.91 


21-012 


Voluntary Local Education 


$ 


4,392.50 




Subtotal 


$ 


284,646.41 




Grand Total 


$ 


406,231.03 



215 





Town of Medfield 




Fund 30 Detail 






Fiscal Year 2002 




Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 
COA-Outreach Worker 




6/30/02 


30-001 


$ 


890.68 


30-006 


Police Drug Education 


$ 


764.70 


30-008 


Youth Advisory 


$ 


88.86 


30-012 


Hazardous Waste Collection 


$ 


1,000.00 


30-013 


Dep Compost Bin 


$ 


1,963.70 


30-015 


Police Vests 


$ 


326.25 


30-016 


Library Building Grant 


$ 


10,239.51 


30-017 


Law Enforcement Block Grant 


$ 


108.26 


30-020 


Title V Public Info. Gr. 


$ 


3,016.39 


30-021 


Seniors Grant 


$ 


- 


30-022 


Election/ Extended Polling Gr. 


$ 


- 


30-023 


Medfield Cultural Council 


$ 


2,042.53 


30-024 


State Aid to Library 


$ 


58,049.68 


30-025 


Federal Ambulance Grant 


$ 


507.76 


30-028 


Community Policing FY98 


$ 


154.62 


30-029 


DEP Recycling Grant 


$ 


24,491.15 


30-031 


Police DARE Grant FY99 


$ 


66.15 


30-032 


Community Policing Radio 


$ 


639.00 


30-033 


Community Policing FY99 


$ 


227.78 


30-034 


Water Pollution Abatement 


$ 


51,481.74 


30-035 


Community Policing FY00 


$ 


2,972.20 


30-036 


DARE FY00 


$ 


135.74 


30-039 


DARE Grant FY01 


$ 


299.43 


30-040 


Police RAD Grant (Self Defense)FY01 


$ 


0.00 


30-041 


Senior Formula Grant FY01 


$ 


- 


30-042 


M Cultural Council Int. Bearing 


$ 


6,250.01 


30-043 


S-Firefighters Safety EQ Grant 


$ 


27.97 


30-044 


Community Policing FY0 1 


$ 


551.89 


30-046 


S-Waste Energy Plant 


$ 


- 


30-047 


S-Swim Pond Water Quality 


$ 


952.31 


30-048 


S-Elect/ Extended Polling Gr FY01 


$ 


- 


30-050 


S-Police RAD Grant FY02 


$ 


(4,369.41) * spend first get reimb later 


30-051 


S-Dare Grant FY02 


$ 


772.86 


30-052 


S-Senior Formula Grant FY02 


$ 


782.97 


30-053 


S-Community Policing FY02 


$ 


13,011.95 




Total 


$ 


177,446.68 




add back 8/28/02 RAD Gr cash recpt 


$ 


4,997.90 * (60 day rule) 




Adjusted Total for Fund 30 


$ 


182,444.58 




Total Federal 


$ 


507.76 




Total State 


$ 


176,938.92 






$ 


177,446.68 




add back 8/28/02 RAD Gr cash recpt 


$ 


4,997.90 * (60 day rule) 






$ 


182,444.58 



216 





Town of Medfield 








Fund 31 Detail 








Fiscal Year 2002 






Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 




6/30/2002 


31-001 


$ 


42,095.00 


31-002 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


$ 


15,655.00 


31-003 


Insurance Reimb <$20,000 


$ 


1,478.40 


31-004 


Park & Recreation Revolving 


$ 


5,832.70 


31-005 


Tennis Revolving 


$ 


9,182.37 


31-006 


Swim Pond revolving 


$ 


6,847.24 


31-007 


Fire Alarm Revolving 


$ 


20,705.29 


31-008 


Kennel Fee Revolving 


$ 


7,874.03 


31-011 


Pilgrim Self Insured Insurance 


$ 


1,266,275.71 


31-012 


Fire CPR Revolving 


$ 


1,066.53 


31-013 


Georgetown Roadwork 


$ 


3,000.00 


31-014 


Tax Refund IRS 


$ 


251.74 


31-015 


Project & Plans 


$ 


67.86 


31-016 


Backflow Fees 


$ 


10,938.00 


31-017 


Special Investigation Police 


$ 


1,473.50 


31-019 


Theatre Revolving 


$ 


1,085.95 


31-021 


West Mill Street Restoration 


$ 


5,500.00 


31-022 


Police Special Detail 


$ 


44,478.31 


31-024 


Conservation Fees 


$ 


10,249.61 


31-026 


Adv Life Support Fees Ambulanc 


$ 


5,563.12 


31-027 


Historical Commission Fees 


$ 


85.00 


31-028 


Ambulance Mileage Fees Revolg 


$ 


94,065.05 


31-029 


Add'l Chap 90 funds 


$ 


43,493.18 


31-032 


USPO Legal reimbursement 


$ 


183.51 


31-033 


Town Hall Renv Bonding Company 


$ 


41,866.36 


31-036 


Fire Arms Revolving 


$ 


3,837.60 


31-038 


Phase 1 A Bonding Settlement 


$ 


41.45 


31-040 


Pilgr. Enh 65 Self Insurance 


$ 


130,139.18 


31-041 


Police RAD Class Rev. Acc't 


$ 


(662.29) 




Total For Fund 31 


$ 


1,772,669.40 



217 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 32 Detail 
Fiscal Year 2002 



Account 

Number Account Title 

32-001 Cable Access Gift 

32-002 Fire Gift 

32-003 Dwight Derby House Gift 

32-004 Civil Defense gift 

32-006 Copeland Gift Police 

32-007 School/Police Safety Gift 

32-008 Council on Aging Gift 

32-0 1 Brook Run Development Gift 

32-01 1 Pondview Sidewalk gift 

32-0 1 3 Drug Wages Norwood Gift 

32-014 Historical Commission Gift 

32-0 1 5 Long Range Planning Gift 

32-0 1 6 Comm to Study Memorials Gift 

32-017 MaodacGift 

32-0 1 8 Memorial Day Gift 

32-0 1 9 Hazardous Waste Gift 

32-020 Outreach Gift 

32-02 1 Miscellaneous Gift 

32-022 Park & Recreation Gift 

32-023 Corning Best Way Gift 

32-025 Town Meeting Gift 

32-026 Selectmen's Gift 

32-027 Ambulance Gift 

32-028 Library Gift 

32-030 Grist Mill Gift 

32-03 1 Town Common Gift 

32-032 Conservation Gift 

32-033 Gallery Gift 

32-034 Library Building Gift 

32-035 Dare Police Donations 

32-037 350th Anniv Gifts /Donations 

32-038 COA TRIAD Gift 

32-039 Library Book/Materials Gift 

32-040 Mc Carthy Field Gift Fund 

32-041 Kennel Operations Gift 

32-042 COA-Senior Van Gift AC 

32-043 Arts/Cult Council Gift-Est 3/02 
Total 



Balance 
6/30/2002 



$ 100.00 

$ 1,626.84 

$ 1,000.00 

$ 3,442.62 

$ 16,252.34 

$ 164.20 

$ 5,609.55 

$ 42,883.38 

$ 193.87 

$ 742.46 

$ 34.00 

$ 447.00 

$ 3,613.03 

$ 31.94 

$ 3,226.46 

$ 3,434.09 

$ 2,455.26 

$ 1,488.02 

$ 2,369.68 

$ 569.80 

$ 75.00 

$ 1,398.96 

$ 4,367.51 

$ 38,859.69 

$ 8,828.66 

$ 2,531.06 

$ 1,107.04 
$ 

$ 39,214.01 

$ 2,643.20 

$ 10,405.17 

$ 641.41 

$ 4,729.01 

$ 242.42 

$ 1,160.00 

$ 2,171.86 

$ 629.00 

$ 208,688.54 



School 
32-005 Computer Gift Program-School 
32-029 MCCA Gift 

Total School 



$ 27,272.05 
$ 251.95 
$ 27,524.00 



Total For Fund 32 



$ 236,212.54 



218 





Town of Medfield 








Fund 80 Detail 








Trust Funds 






Account 


Fiscal Year 2002 




Balance 


Number 


Account Title 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust 


( 


5/30/2002 


80-001 


$ 


561,393.00 


80-002 


Unemployment Comp Trust 


$ 


232,654.70 


80-003 


Conservation Trust Fund 


$ 


176,022.76 


80-004 


Library Trust Fund 


$ 


15,573.63 


80-005 


Pension Trust Fund 


$ 2,620,150.18 


80-006 


Stabilization Trust Fund 


$ 


721,725.37 


80-007 


Health Claim Group Ins Trust 


$ 


97,848.10 


80-008 


Municipal Building Ins Trust 


$ 


235,196.13 


80-009 


Palumbo Trust Fund-Expendable 


$ 


3,022.90 


80-010 


Gloria G. Lynn Trust-Expendable 


$ 


9,513.10 


80-011 


Council On Ageing Trust-Expend 


$ 


1,875.89 


80-012 


Pilgrim Health Trust Expendable 


$ 


56,753.89 


80-013 


Allendale Sewer Trust Expendbl 


$ 


53,329.95 


80-014 


Dela Park Acres Expendable 


$ 


14,357.70 


80-015 


Carruth Sewer Trust Expendable 


$ 


13,694.44 


80-016 


Cedarview Acres Trust Expendbl 


$ 


13,645.42 


80-017 


Cemetery Perp Care Interest 


$ 


25,989.78 


80-018 


Granville Daily Trust 


$ 


80,716.97 


80-019 


Essay Trust Fund 


$ 


3,286.35 


80-020 


Tri-Centennial Trust Fund 


$ 


2,544.77 


80-021 


Antiquities Trust-Non Expendbl 


$ 


3,978.89 


80-022 


Mad Grant Scholar Trust-Ex 


$ 


120,762.72 


80-023 


Moses Ellis Gar Trust-Non Exp 


$ 


9,506.54 


80-024 


M. Washburn Trust-Non Expend 


$ 


3,087.45 


80-025 


Playground Trust-Park & Rec 


$ 


3,337.81 


80-026 


Madelyn Grant Library Trust Fnd 


$ 


44,640.65 


80-027 


Elderly & Disabled Trust Fd 


$ 


1,914.28 




Total For Trust Fund 80 


$ 5,126,523.37 



Respectfully submitted, 

Joy A. Ricciuto 
Town Accountant 



219 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND FISCAL YEAR 2002 
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENSES 



WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 

TOTAL WATER REVENUES 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED: 

COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 60-410-1 AND 60-410-2: 
PERSONNEL (salary+longevity) 
OPERATIONS 
RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

-STORMWATER PHASE II $50,000 

SUB-TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 
INTEREST 01-751-2 

SUB-TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 

INSURANCE 

PENSIONS 01-911-2 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 

CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN 

THE ENTERPRISE FUND: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
TAXATION 
FREE CASH 
NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE ENTERPRISE FUND 

WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 
MINIMUM (FOR 6 MONTHS) S20.00 
0-35,000 GALLONS $1.70/1,000 GALLONS 
>35,000 - 70,000 GALLONS $2.70/1,000 GALLONS 
OVER 70,000 GALLONS $3.70/1,000 GALLONS 



$ 948,397 



948,397 



$ 
$ 


210,793 
357,319 


$ 


50,000 


$ 


618,112 


$ 

$ 


105,000 
75,958 


$ 


180,958 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


21,290 

28,312 

93,146 

6,579 



149,327 



948,397 



$ 


948,397 


$ 


(948,397) 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


948,397 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


____948,_3_97__ 



220 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND FISCAL YEAR 2002 
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES $ 

TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 



794,058 



794,058 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED: 

COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 60-420-1 AND 60-420-2: 
PERSONNEL (salary+longevity) 
OPERATIONS 
RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

-INFILTRATION INFLOW $40,000 
-STORMWATER PHASE II $50,000 

SUB-TOTAL SEWER DEPARTMENT 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 
INTEREST 01-751-2 

SUB-TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 

INSURANCE 

PENSIONS 01-911-2 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 
ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 

CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN 

THE ENTERPRISE FUND: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
TAXATION 
FREE CASH 
NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE ENTERPRISE FUND 



$ 187,763 
$ 366,220 



90,000 



j__. 


643,983 






$ 
$ 


- 






$ 


; 






$ 

$ 
$ 
$ 


21,195 

31,088 

93,146 

4,646 

„.150,_075_ 










$ 


794,058 




$ 


- 






$ 
$ 
$ 


794,058 
(794,058) 




$ 


. 




$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


794,058 




.!._ 


__794,_0_58_ 



SEWER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 

HOUSEHOLD: 75% OF WATER CONSUMPTION AT $3. 70 PER THOUS GALLONS 
COMMERCIAL: 100% OF WATER CONSUMPTION AT $3.70 PER THOUS GALLONS 
SEPTIC DISPOSAL FEE: $1 10.00 PER THOUS. GALLONS 



221 



WATER & SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) 
UNDER MASS GENERAL LAWS, CH 40/SECTION 39K 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2002 
WATER 

Total Services 3,745 

Added Services 23 

Thousand Gallons Pumped 521,182,146 

Thousand Gallons Sold 1 ,353,000 

Water Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 1 ,342,905 

Water Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 314,977 certified 

SEWER 

Total Services 1 ,799 

Added Services 130 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 3,390,005 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 377,515 certified 



222 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Sandra Capen 

Joan F. Willgohs 

Francisco and Pauline Medeiros 

William and Edith Cook 

Alexander and Barbara Smith 

Christine Olemedo 

Amanda Basque 

Joan Willgohs 

Susan T. Barbone 

Peter C. Bratsos 

James Faro 

William J. and Christina P. Upham 

Diane Faro 

George W. and Elizabeth R. Hinkley 

MaryKilduff 

David and Carol Ann Domeshek 

Robert L. O'Neil 

Catherine Petrone 

Lorraine Egan 

Bruce P. and Jean L. Waite 

Marion G. Phillips 

John A. Fernandes 

Lorraine Ricard 

Frederick and Helen Dorgan 

Sandra Amorello 



$ 425.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
2,550.00 

850.00 

15.00 

1,700.00 

1,700.00 

425.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 

425.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 

850.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
1,700.00 
$36,140.00 



223 



INDEX 



Elected and Appointed Officials 8 

Town Department Reports 

Aging, Council on 81 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 37 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 30 

Assessors, Board of 31 

Cemetery Commission 47 

Conservation Commission 48 

Fire Department 39 

Health, Board of 71 

Historical Commission 54 

Historic District Commission 57 

Housing Authority 79 

Inspection Department 43 

Library Trustees 65 

Medfield Emergency Management Agency 35 

Memorials, Committee to Study 66 

Memorial Day Address 68 

Memorial Public Library 63 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 88 

Norfolk County Commissioners 87 

Norfolk County Mosquito Control 91 

Open Space Committee 53 

Parks and Recreation Commission 84 

Planning Board 28 

Police Department 33 

Public Works Department 21 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 46 

Selectmen, Board of 18 

3 5 th Anniversary Committee 6 1 

Town Clock, Keepers of 60 

Tree Warden and Insect Control 86 

Tri County Regional Vocational Technical School District 93 

Veterans' Service Officer 67 

Water and Sewerage, Board of 24 

School Department Reports 

School Committee 97 

Superintendent of Schools 101 

Staff Directory 103 

Director of Finance and Operations 120 



224 



Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 1 22 

Graduation Exercises, High School 1 25 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 132 

Dale Street School 136 

Ralph Wheelock School 139 

Memorial School 142 

Pupil Services Department 145 

Athletic Director 148 

Community Education Program 155 

Town Clerk's Records 

Marriages 157 

Deaths 159 

Births 161 

Town Meetings and Elections 

Special Town Meeting: February 1 1 , 2002 1 63 

Annual Town Election: March 25, 2002 165 

Annual Town Meeting: June 10, 2002 168 

Special Town Meeting: June 1 0, 2002 1 85 

Special State Primary: September 17, 2002 189 

State Election: November 5, 2002 200 

Financial Reports 

Assessors, Board of 207 

Collector of Taxes 208 

Perpetual Care 223 

Town Accountant 212 

Treasurer 209 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds 220 



225 



MEDFIELD HOARD OF SELECTMEN 




IT & 

Lawrence £• Abar 

19684972 




IT - —""""" — ^ 

R, Edward Beard 

1975- 1981 



t> SI 

Austin C. Buchanan 

1959-1968 



Herbert B. Burr 
1955-1958 




Kenneth M. ChOds, Jr. Richard G. Connors 
1981-1985 1964-1967 




Richard P. DeSorgher 
i 980- 1983 




Arthur J. Farrar 

1973-1976 




&— — —j 

Walter M. Frank 
1967-1970 




k & 

Robert FL Fraser 

1.941-1943 




John F, Ganiey 
1990-1993 




Ik :T :•:■-;■■;,■•:•::; :-:-: a i 

Charles W. Haigh 
84-1937 1940-1946 




Frank G, Haley 
1927-1954 



1 



;i;i;|:<;::|:i 




John T. Harney 
1994-2000 




Tidal B. Henry 

1993-1996 




I. : W J 

Harry A. Kelieher 

1968-1977 



Weston G» Kosti 

1970-1973 




1^ -~:j 

Robert J, Larkin 

1981-1990 







Joseph L. Marcionette 

1947-1964 1971-1975 




&T ■■ "A 

William £. McCarthy 

1946-1955 



Sandra G* Munsev 

1977-1980 
f!Li ... % 




Harold F. Fritoni. Jr. 

1988-1994 




William F» bourse 
1985-1988 

r i 




^ ...... >£ 

Clarence X, Purvis 
1996-1999 




Ik — —j. 

Edward R. Perry 

1963-1966 




Ik —J 

William R. Reagan 
1976-1981 




:■ , 

Osier L. Peterson 
2000 to Present 




^ ^ 

Faui B. Rhuda 

1999 -Present 




& '"7j 

Joseph A. Roberts 
1954-1963 



Ann B. Thompson 
1 983-Presem 




Lo